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THE PRINCE OF MONTENEGRO.

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THE PRINCE OF MONTENEGRO. Mr. W. Denton writes to The Times from Westbourne- square :— In your leading article of Saturday you have ex- pressed your belief that at the renewal of the war con- sequent upon the rupture between Turkey and the European Powers it would have been better that Montenegro had withdrawn from any participation in the war, in the same way that Servia did. While acknowledging the kindliness and justice of all that you say, permit me to point out that it was not in the power of Prince Nicholas to do so. He was ready to maintain peace. This he has declared, and those who know him know how truthful he has always shown himself. He made no claim for any consideration to himself or his people he insisted upon no concession but he would not pur- chase a peace which he desired on the conditions in- sisted upon, which were the expulsion of Herzegovinian refugees—women, old men, and children for the most part—without a guarantee for their safety. Prince Nicholas pleaded fer their safaty and asked for a pro- mise that they should not suffer because they had fled in terror from the Turk. This was refused. The second point equally showed his honourable character. At the beginning of hostilities the Koutchi tribe, formerly and until within the last 20 or 30 years a portion of the Montenegrin people, had reunited themselves to their old neighbours and had returned to their old allegiance. The Turk required that he should give up these people to be dealt with as might seem fit to the Perle. We all know what that means. Prince Nicholas refused to do so. He declared that if he had any territory on which he could settle them he would give them up their country; he would not give up those who had incurred the hostility of the Turk because they had preferred their old ruler and had trusted in him. These were the only conditions on which he insisted—the pledge of safety to the old men, women, and children who had taken shelter in Montenegro, and the retention of the Kourtchi who had united their fortunes with those of the Montenegrins. I think that many of your readers will feel that a man of honour was bound to risk pos- sible loss unless he could secure the safety of both these peoples."

LIFE AT NICOPOLIS,

WEEKLY REVIEW OF THE CORN…

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THE PASSAGE OF THE DANUBE.

THE WAR WITH MONTENEGRO.

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ANOTHER STEP IN THE RIGHT…

.fc.I,■——'■■"1 THE PASSAGE…

GRAND BANQUET AT THE TRINITY…

11ii . A STUDENT IN THE RANKS.

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THE " COMPARATIVE ANTIQUITY…

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