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- THE STATE OF IRELAND.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT BOARD INQUIRY…

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT BOARD INQUIRY AT CARDIFF. THE CHARGES AGAINST DR. LOUGHER. An inquiry, by direction of the Local Govert ment Board, was held at the Cardiff Union Worh house, before Mr. Birehain, district inspector fo the Local Governmont Board, on Tuesday, inti charges of incivility and discourteous treatmen of a pauper by Dr. Lougher. Titere were present besides Mr. Bircham, Dr. Paine, the chairman o: the guardians; Messrs. Wride and Phillips, guar dians of WhifclTurch, where the pauper resided Dr. Morgan Williams. Dr. Evans (CrockherbLown), Dr. Lougher, Mr. Harris, clerk to the board, aati Mr. Hopkins, relieving officer for theWhitchurch district. Mr. Bircham briefly explained the purport oi the inquiry, and read the letters sent by tha guardians to the Local Government Board asking for the inquiry to be hetd.and also the letter of ex. planation forwarded to the Local Government Board by Dr. Lougher, a copy of which had been sent to the guardians. He also stated that it was not hia intention to hear any evidence respecting previoua charges of negiector incivility or want of courtesy on the part of Dr. Lougher, beyond receiving 1 copies of the minutes as recorded in the minutes of the proceedings of the guardians at the time the cases cams before and were dealt with by thmn. The complainant,Thomas Edwards, an old and infirm man, who walked with difficulty, was then assisted into the room by Mr. Hopkins, and had to be accommodated with a chair. He said he was a labouring man, and lived at Whitchurch. He was 76 years of age, and his wife, who died a few days since, v<"<8 71 years of age. She had been ill for years, but had not been attended by a surgeon. On the 23rd of October, as she was in a surgeon. On the 23rd of October, as she was in a good deal of pain, he sent a no'e asking Dr. Lougher to attend her. He and his wife had been in receipt of parish relief for nearly two years. The 23rd was a Saturday morning, and one of hi4 neighbours wrote a note, and he sent his grandson with it to Dr. Louyher's bouse, with instructions to wait there and see Dr. Lougher. The bov waited nearly two hours, then left the note, and returned home. He should have sent to Mr Hopkins for an order, but he knew that Mr Hopkins was in Cardiff on Saturdays. Dr. Louohet between one and two o'clock 011 Sunday knocked at the door and asked if Thomas Edwards lived there, and, on being told "Yes," he came in and said, What is the ,matter r" He then stepped inside about a yard from the door, and began to seolù. He asked in a very rough way what business they har] to Bend a private note to him, when tiley ought to have obtained an order from Mr. Hopkins, When Dr. Lougher begin to scold he used some very bad language. He said that they were a parcel of d- fools. He then went up to com plainant's wife, and asked her what, was her com- plaint. He kept on scolding them all tha time. Complainant could not remember what. his wife said to him in reply to his questions, neither could he distinctly recollect all that took place between the doctor and himself, as he was in such a. puzzle" at seeing him and hearing him scold so. Dr. Lougher asked for a piece of paper on which to write a prescription. His (complainant's) grand- daughter had left the house as soon as Dr. Lougher began to scold them because she was frightened, and he could not find the ink and paper. Then his wife got up to look for them, and while she was speaking to Dr. Laugher he re- plied a dozen times, Don't talk to me, you d——« old fool." He wrote the prescription, and told wit- ness to send it to the surgery on Monday morning. He asked Dr. Lougher if his wife ought, not to have tha medicine before, and he replied, If you like," but did not tell him at what, time the surgery was open on Sundays. He never went up close to his wife, felt, her pulse, or did anything. Dr. Lougher told him that he had made enough fuss" and noise before when his grandson was ill, and when he sent for him, because he (Dr. Lougher) did not come up. That was ou a Saturday also. Dr. Lougher said at that time that he would not come, and did not, although tha boy was very pad, and it required four men to hold him that night, as he was delirious. He then sent for another doctor, and Dr. Treharne came up. Dr. bougher did not come up for eight or nine days after the visit on the Sunday when he scolded them so, and he sent for Dr. Evans; but on the day Dr. Evans was expected Dr. Lougher came, and was very attentive and since then he had behaved like a gentleman. On the Sunday Dr. Lougher called him and his wife also" d- old paupers." Ha complained that the note was not sent before nina o'clock in the morning, and said if the note was not sent before nine o'clock in the morning another time he would not go up, not if death was on the bed." In reply to Dr, Lougher, the old man said he thought that he must have been either mad or drunk when he came in. He denied walking up and down the room and saying, I have shaken hands with the Marquess of Bute and Mr. Thomas, and am a d —— sight better man than you are." He denied calling Dr. Lougher a fonl, but when Dr. Lougher called him a fool he replied, I'm not a bigger fool than you." He denied that he waS ever asked to pay the fees. Dr. Lougher knew lu was a pauper. Mary Woodward, a girl thirteen years of age, said that she was in the house when Dr. Loughei called to see her grandmother. As soon as h< entered he began to make a noise and talk savagely at her grandfather, before her grandfather spoilt to him. As she was very nervous and subject tc fits, ghe theu went outside anL1 heard no more, Mr. Phillips, one of the guardians for Whit- church, said that the old woman before she died related to him the circumstances of Dr. Lougher' visit, and her statement corresponded almost word for word with the old man's narrative that day. He went to see her owing to the rumour respect- ing Dr. Lougher's conduct in the village. The Clerk (Mr. Harris) then handed to Mr. Bircham a number of extracts from the minute: of the proceedings of the guardians when chargei of want of attention or want of civility had beec preferred against Dr. Lougher. One case occurred on the 13th of February, 1875; another on the 3rd of April, 1875; another on the 31st of August, 1878; another in 1882, another in 1883, another in 1885, and another in 1886, but the guardians, with one exception, when there was a Local Govern- ment Board inquiry, only desired liim to be mora cautious in future. ¡ Dr. Lougher was then examined, and said that he adhered to the letter he had written to the Local Government Board (which has already beer published). He then said that he went to tht house of Thomas Edwards on the 24th of October, Not knowing hiin, he knocked at the door and a'ked if Thomas Edwards lived there, and on being told" Yes he said that he had called to seo Mrs. Edwards. He found her reclining on a bench just inside the room. He inquired of her her symptoms then he inquired if they were able to pay his fees or whether they had sent for him as paupers, because they had sent him a private note. Edwards replied that they were in receipt of parish relief, and were entitled to his attendance when they required him. The old man then spoke very im- pertinently to him, and told him he ought to have come up on the Saturday night when he sent tha note. He (Dr. Lougher) told him that he did not receive the note till half-past five on the Saturday evening, and he had then been out since ten in the morning, and he could not possibly come up that night. Edwards again repeated that he ouyht to have got another horse, if his horse was tired, and have come up. He said, iu an impertinent tone, "You ought to have come up when you were sent for." He (Dr. Lougher) then explained that had the note been delivered betore ten o'clock in the morning he would have beon visited during the day. He also told him that he should have sent an order from the relieving officer, and not, a private note. Edwards repiied. stiu in an impertinent tone, "Supposing I had broken my leg, what was I to do then?" He also said, I suppose it's because we are paupers we must not write notes." He was at times very insolent, and said I have never troubled you yet, but I mean to do so for the future," and he walked up and down tha room in a great temper, and called him (Dr. Lougher) a fool. He (Dr. Lougtier) replied, Unless you conduct yourself properly I shall ieave tha houae," and Edwards said" You may go if you like; I can get Mrs. Ingledew's doctor to come up." There was then an altercation between them, and he (Dr. Lougher) lost his temper, and threatened to leave the house, the man's conduct was so bad. He denied that he ever said that; unless the note came before nine o'clock in the morning he would not come up, even if the person were dying. That was a misapprehension from his saying that if the note came before nine o'clock in the morning ;1 would ensure his visit that day. He also dei icd calling the old man or his wife a d fool, he .v«s also positive that he never used an uncivil word until the man's abuse upset him. The woman was suffering from chronic inflammation of the bladder. He attended her on the 24th, 26th, and 30th of October, sevetal times in November, and visited her the day before she died. In reply to Mr. Phillips, Dr. Lougher admitted having attended the old man as a pauper, but at the time that he received the note lie had forgotten it. He had a conversation with Mr. Hopkins, the relieving officer, on the Suuday morning before he went to see the Edwardses, but he could not recollect whether any reference was made to their by Mr. Hopkins. Dr. Evans, as his name had been mentioned, desired to give evidence respecting the imper- tinent character of the oldfttian Edwards, but 11.9 Mr. Phillips and Dr. Paine then desired to go into the previous charges against Dr. Lougher, the evi- dence was refused. Mi-, bircham stating that ho sllould send his report to the Local Governmenll Hoard, and add the extracts given to hÏil. by Mr. Harris with reierence to Dr. Lougher, but without any comment. The proceedings then terminated.

SNOWSTORM IN NOWCn WALES.

FOUR THOUSAND WEAVKfiS LOCKEE…

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HEAVY FINES AT PENARTH.