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DESPERATE STRUGGLE FOR LIFE.

. THE INQUEST.

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THE INQUEST. ADDITIONAL PARTICULARS. THE SUSPECTED MAN STILL AT LARGE. Despite the efforts of the police in the Metropolis and throughout the country, no trace has yet been found up, to Tuesday evening, of the missing man Lefroy, and although it was stated that he nau been seen in the north of London, and although this clue was at once followed up, nothing has yet come of it. The excitement in Wallington shows no sign of abatement, but is rather intensified. Inspector Goodall, of the Metropolitan Police, and other officials from Scotland-yard have been prosecuting enquiries in the neighbourhood, and have learned all particulars of his late circum- stances and habits. They have made every effort to obtain one of Lefroy's photographs, but have not succeeded, although they have been put in possession of a pencil sketch, made by Mr Jackson, an innkeeper of Carshalton, which is said to be a faithful likeness of the man. A Dewsbury correspondent telegraphs A gentlemanly-looking man entered a village near this town, and, calling for a glass of beer, sat down. The landlord was struck by his very great resemblance to the published descriptions of the missing man Lefroy, and said to him, Why you are the very picture of the man who is sup- posed to have committed the murder on the rail- way near Brighton." On hearing this the young man trembled violently, but did not speak. He then suddenly rose, and ran from the house, getting quickly out of sight. The landlord went down to Dewsbury and reported the whole matter to the police officers, who at once set out to make every inquiry with a view to effecting the arrest of the stranger. On Wednesday morning Mr Wynn Lewis, the coroner for East Sussex, opened the enquiry con- cerning the death of Mr Isaac Frederick Gould. The jury met at the Railway Hotel, Balcombe, where the body was lying, and the coroner pro- posed that they should go and view the body, and then the railway carriage in which the foul deed had been committed, after which they should adjourn to more commodious premises, and take all the evidence which could be given, and then adjourn for a certain time, to be determined later on. The jury then proceeded to view the body, which was lying in the shed, after which they inspected the carriage which had been shunted into a siding at Balcombe, the doors being sealed up. The coroner explained tho details to the jury, and the railway officials showed the position the carriage would be in when running through the tunnel. The outside of the carriage was seen to be much smeared, and the interior literally covered with blood. Mr Jas.. Hollis was called, and identified the body as that of Mr Frederick Isaac Gould, of Litchfield, Preston, a retired stockbroker. Mrs Gould, wife of the deceased, was next ex- amined and said she had not seen the body, but Mr Hollis had identified it. Mr Gould usually went to London on Monday and sometimes on other days. He had gone to collect the takings of a shop he owned in Walworth, and had to collect some money for her. She heard that he paid in £50 to the Eastern Branch of the London and Westminster Bank. He usually gave her the house money monthly, and Monday would have been the day to have brought that money down. Nobody but herself and the servant knew that this was the day he brought the money down. Her sister and husband lived at Wallington. Mr Gould usually.travelled by the same train, and was too nervous to carry a pistol. She should think he had got her dividends, which were about due, and paid them into the bank. She identified several articles as belonging to her husband, but a collar stained with blood was handed to her which she said did not belong to him, and was much too small. Mary Pill was next examined, and said she was the daughter of Alfred Pill, of Wallington, brother- in-law of Mrs Gould. Mr Gould did not call upon them that day. She had not seen him this year, but he had been to Wallington. She knew No. 4, Cathcart-road, but did not know anybody living there. Dr. Byass, of Cuckfield, said he examined the body of Mr Gould on Monday night. The de- ceased's clothing was saturated with blood, and his shirt collar was missing. There were wounds on the arms and hands. The wounds on the face were as if caused by some sharp instrument, but there was no bullet wound, and his opinion was that death resulted from the hemorrhage from the < wounds, and the fracture of the skull, which was caused by the fall from the carriage. Mr Benjamin Hall, acting-house surgeon at the Brighton Hospital, said he had examined the wounds of the man Lefroy, who was brought to the hospital on Monday night. They were not such as would have caused so much blood as appeared upon his clothing, but might have caused Lefroy to be in a fainting condition. The wounds might have been caused by a pistol barrel or car- penter's gouge. Mrs Ann Brown, who resides at Horley, testi- fied that she and her daughter were at the window when the two o'clock train from London passed by. Their house adjoined the railway, and they saw in one of the carriages two men standing up and struggling, either fighting or larking. This was between two and three o'clock, and they could not, of course, distinguish more than the figures of the two men. It would be impossible to recognise them. Horley is 10 miles from Bal- combe Tunnel. Thos. Jennings, labourer, deposed to finding the body. Mr Benjamin Hall said he had examined the body, and found a mark below the ear, which he ascribed to a bullet wound. Dr. Byass concurred. He also described the appearance of the compartment in which the struggle took place. Mr W. H. Gibson, chemist, King's-road, Brighton, said he travelled by the two o'clock express on Monday from London, and rode in the compartment next deceased. On entering Merst- ham Tunnel he heard four loud reports, and thought at the time they were fog signals, but afterwards believed the report proceeded from the next compartment. The inquest was adjourned till Saturday.

[No title]

----_.... STRANGE SUICIDE…

THE SWANSEA PILOTS AS THE…

NEW INDEPENDENT ORAl AT LLANGENNECH.■

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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT j ---

SHOCKING MURDER AT BELFAST.

A LONDONER'S LOVE-MAKING IN…

----THE BEND OR LIBEL CASE.

MR GRANT-DUFF AND THE MADRAS…

THREE PERSONS DROWNED.

FATAL STEAMER COLLISION ON…

[No title]

THE ASSAULT BY LORD TOWNSHEND.…

GREAT FIRE AT HULL. -----

------------------GROSS CILUELTY…

----------ATTEMPTED OUTRAGE…