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(Cair Conbon (SorttSBonkn!.…

GENERAL GORDON AT KHARTOUM

CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERS.

THE KING OF NORWAY 0 N TEE…

[No title]

IA SINGULAR WILL CASE. !

OTTER HUNTING.

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OTTER HUNTING. The first opening note which proclaims that old Bellman or Borderer has winded him is generally followed by a chorus which makes the whole welkin ring. Up stream the run commences in earnest, and great is the hurry scurry of the crowd behind, who, afraid of deep pools, at times leave the bed for the banks and scramble as best they can along the face amidst rock and hazel. Hard-pressed, the otter may cross country till another bend, and this of course allows of some fresh excitement and diversion, during which those who have tumbled in up to the neck forget altogether the soaked condition of their clothes. The welcome check allows of the stragglers in here to get up, and then follows, possibly, some most exciting work with the terriers. Hound after hound, anxious all the time they are trying to unearth him, will keep swimming, with nostrils dilated, and full of scent, up stream, every now and then making deep echoes ring amongst the woodland banks. Inside the terriers have not a very good time of it, for, strong of fang, the otter fights quite as fiercely as does the wild cat of the Highlands. Fre- quently the plucky little dogs have been pulled out in a half-dead condition, with a bit of the nose or an ear off, or without one or both eyes. Then comes the grand fight in the pool, in which to him has yielded, possibly after a fierce hunt, many a plump salmon. Disappearing amidst a mass of broken water, he is viewed again by some spectators, as he vents down stream, and the chase again commences in earnest. Th(? friendly earth or open drain is sought by him in rain, and ho would fain take refuge in the covering shed of the mill-wheel, from which he has often been scared' by the miller as he turns on the sluice atj early morning. His shaggy-muzzled, rough-coated tormentors give him but little rest, and at length, almost worn out, he is surrounded in the pool, the followers joining hands and forming a ring, through "vrhich he finds it difficult to escape. Game to the very last, 'he drags to the bottom some fierce hound which has pressed him too close, and almost drowns him ere he lets him free. Scarcely a hound that tackles him escapes scatheless, and his is no mere hare's bite. At last an opportunity presents itself for the M.O.H. to perform one of the most daring and most dexterous of all feats, viz., the tailing of the otter. No one who Ltcks muscle in the arm, or confidence in himself, need ritempt this; and even with the most brave and skil- ful huntsman it is attended with no little danger.— Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News.

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.THE INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES…

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THE SOUDAN EXPEDITION.