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IMPUDENT LIBRARY THEFTS.

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IMPUDENT LIBRARY THEFTS. On Friday a person named Ethel Dowsett, who gave a temporary address in Vale Road and stated that she was a native of London, was brought up in custody charged with stealing 4 library books of the value of 15s from Mr Taylor's stationery shop in High Street, and 4 from Mr Sandoe's in Bodfor Street. Mr W Elwy Williams and Mr J H Ellis occupied the bench, and the case preferred by Mr Taylor was first taken. Ada Myfanwy Wynne, Brynysgol, Rhuddlan, assistant to Mr Taylor, said she let out two of the books to a person who called herself Miss Edwards, who witness thought was the prisoner. She gave 30 Vale Road as her address. This was on the 15th, and prisoner paid 2d for each book for one week. The books were not returned. They had been labelled outside and inside, but the labels had now been washed off. Two other books found on prisoner belonged to Mr Taylor. They were not let out, but had been missed off the shelf after prisoner had been in the shop. Maud Guthrie deposed that she was a stationer at 29 High Street. Prisoner came to her on the previous night, and asked if she would buy books from her-she had one in her hand-at Is each. Witness offered os for six, which was accepted. Witness noticed that the book left by prisoner had labels taken off it. She then communicated with Mr Taylor. He identified the book as his property. In the meantime prisoner came back and left the books on being paid 5s and giving a receipt in the name of Kate Hardy. Mr Taylor was called again, and he followed the prisoner to another shop. He brought her back and identified the book in prisoner's presence. Witness admitted having taken out two from the library, and having taken the labels off. Prisoner complained that witness had not refused to buy the hooks, rather than buy them and then giving information to Mr Taylor. Sergeant McWalter said that between 8 and 8-30 he visited Miss Guthrie's shop, and found prisoner in the kitchen, with Miss Guthrie and Mr Taylor. The latter said in prisoner pres- ence that 4 of the books were his and that he believed the others were Sandoe's. Two had been hired out by prisoner, who had stolen the other two. Witness asked prisoner if that was so, and she begged not to be prosecuted, that it was so. She was stranded here and did it to get some money. She expected to get some em- ployment. Prisoner produced 4s 6d of the money she had received for the books, the other 6d having been spent at a grocer's shop for some tea and a bottle of stout, which ware found in her bag. Prisoner was taken to the police station and asked where she lodged. She replied "I will plead guilty to the lot, don't make further inquiries." Prisoner admitted having been convicted of stealing books at Birkenhead on the 20th of last month where she was fined f.3 10s and costs. Mr Sandoe identified three of the books as belonging to him. Prisoner admitted that they were his books. Prisoner pleaded guilty and said that she was stranded, and had done it to get some money. She had done it before, and in a mad moment it came to her mind to do it again. Inspector Pearson stated that from docu- ments found on prisoner it was evident that up to a certain period she bore a good character. She was a teacher but left the profession to join a travelling company of some sort, which had come to a smash. Last month she was brought up in Birkenhead on three charges of stealing library books, and was fined in each. Her brother paid the money, the total expense coming to about zElO. In a letter to prisoner her brother said that he would not help her out of any similar trouble again. The justices consulted together for some time as to the punishment. Ultimately, Mr Williams said that, although the case was a serious one, and prisoner had previously and very recently been convicted, they were going to deal very leniently with her. She was an educated woman and ought to have acted differently. Though she might not get work in her own profession at Rhyl, she could find plenty of other temporary employment, which would have been far better for her than indulge in thefts. She would be fined 1:2 5s or 21 days.

BILE BEANS CURE DECLINE.

Sacred Concert.

AGOR RHEILFFORDD DYFFRYN CLWYD.

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