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ST. MARY'S PARISH CHURCH,

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ST. MARY'S PARISH CHURCH, 'CONTINUED FtiOJI PAGJJ: 5."] =.upersti ions in which the people had been reared, and in Swansea the transformation was probably too gradual to be noticeable in a period of vast changes. It was in compliance with the Proclamation of the Protectorate oi Edward VI. that the rood was taken down in St IVIaiy's—though it took *en years tor the churchwardens to hear of the Proclamation aad perform it. The rood loft once spanned the loftv I'baiTCil arch. The cost of this portion of the' Reformation was very racoasideraOie. tor only 4d, was "paid to vVylle John, the Smyth, citakeyng down the rowde." The church was still tbe centre of the town s life Until Elizabeth established a betcer «ysW, a benevolence ^or the poor was collected every Sunday as &t Mary's, and on all joyous occasions, from a Koyaiist victory at Ernleoo Castclle" to the proclamation of Richard Cromwell as Lord Protestor, tne bells pealed H-er.-ily They tolled or pealed according to a eraduated and special scale. VVnen a fourth bell was added in 1619, the parishioners agreed, on account d the ext» ordenarie charge towardes the repaying of the bells," tfeat: lmf,:imis, the ripO"crs -or ther part is to have for everie peals l'ngir.g bT,f an onre longe the some of eight pence. A'so it is ordered that EO dobell koill is to be routine for any sengel bodie unless th^y do ray to tije churchwardens towarcies the bells tow sail1 ing 3 and eight pence. Ani as for st-rangers, yf iter be any that will Have any knill L Y1"ge that they do')ickwi«e pf.y unto the war 'is to?— -<ies the beiis tow si'iiangs and eigi-t pence; so that they do not exceed above sixpea:3; aad 31 tney will have ai;y mor rounge it is agreed upon that they sbad lickwise pay towardes the ;»id bells 2s. 8d. mor," Tne people attended a chivch whose service was widely diCerent from that in vog le to-day. It was carried on amid certain disadvantages of aa amusing desci.pticn. in 1598 the church- wavden-s spent a penny ou srnalle cordes to m:ik > a whippe for tne dogges in the church Iu 1624, ap!are-i.y, the canine order of creation was exe uded from public worsl D, for there was paid a yeacly stipend of 2s. ior keeping the cogkes out oc the cnurcb." It was m sucn sur :o;indings as these little itemainvcluntaniy suggest, tuat the Rerorntation took place m Swansea T ,e days of the Smarts were more event.ul. and upo: Vicar Morgan Hopkin be hand of adversifcv fell heavily. Suec.-edmg to the nrag in 1633,"he was ejected duiing tie ReLelhor. when the soldiers of the Parliament over-ran Gower. ejected the founder cf the Swansea Grammar School from his living in Oxwich, and occupied the Swansea Castle. Hoplcn, however, returned with the Rq toration. The line of ÙCfI.,c:s continues then pea^efudy down to the present century, when Hewson, Squire and Smith form a trio of ecclesiastical st'en^tn, the former in eloquence, the others in organisation and church extension. Tne con gregations to which Dr. Hewson preached differed widely from the congregations to-day. There was s^me truth in the change that hi^ church was thi church of tne rich. i he ser- vices were for inferior. There was none or that hearty responsive service which we now sap in St. ^VX&ry s, and all the other churches of the town aud district," wrote the Rev. E. G. Williams in an article in Tne Cambrian some vea'-s ago; "but it was ohe old humdrtan dragging dialogue between parson and clerk, which reduced the outward observance of relig on to an object of d?risioa to the ci- Jess and iniiitt"erect. Dr. Hewson was a. faMy good reader himself, but the responses of the c.erk were delivered in aa undergone, nasal voice, which was pain:.uI to hear, wrpUt tnr-ougaout '■0 church-a murmuring hum was heard, by some uf the congregation reading- the responses in a stdl lower key. The chants and hymns were creditably suns' by a well-consti'.iii.ed choir, the organist being Mr. John Williams, who was succeeded by his daughter, the laL Mrs. John Williams Morris." To return to the ancient building, there were three chantries attached, those of the rdoiy "rinity, St. Anne, aad St. Xicholas. The two farmer took the form of ciiapeis, wbile the latter was si:nply an altar or shrine, located probably in the foraier chapel. The chapel of the Holy Trinity cam a to be known as Glover's Chapel, which would seem to suggest that the pocple ot Swansaa had taken advantage of the Charter of Oliver Cromwell, and "had and enjoyed"— though not" for ever hereafter"—"one ffrt 1 guild of merchants." The architectural features of the church, at th's time are shrouded in a certain amount of mysterv. The chronicler of the Duke of Beau- fort's Progress in 1634, drew a church with the tower and nave separated, a peculiarity wh;ch is denied to St. Mary's. The chronicler was more interested in the "uncouth rhyrces of the graveyard than the arcbilec i.ural accuracy of bis drawings, and he gives us some cf the curious epitaphs that were engraved on the tombstones:— Here bleeps a Ransom.d corpse in his cold. bed, Waiting for toe Quick Rfiser of tile dead. IlICHAKD JONES, 16 1." Another stone bore the distinguished arms of the Spes'ser (Earl of Sunderland) family, and the inscription was :— Here He*ti the body of Jeremiah Spenser, of this town, who departed this 11 te ¡X July, lr;- 1, '2 years, Although by water he lust his b'e.tb, I hope with Xste his soul's at ren." This unlettered muse which raised a modest t-ihu^e over the grave of younsc Spenser, who was drowoed in the bay, supplied many.3. cold marble with its humble elegy. Inside the cbnrch the memories of Lady Mowbray, Sir Hugh Johnys. Sir Matthew Cradock and his ■w^e, Eishop Core, xnd other celebriues of a ioaaaut;c past, had surer pa-sports to eternity. But even they were subjected to the insults of an age which, although it etfected the transition fr^m an a^. cultural to a commercial society, and gave birth to men of high character and sterling practical worth, was nevertheless Tirositic if not unintel':gent in its tastes. It wt-s 1 11 t u eis-^teenth century that the roof of the old church fell an(j tnen another edifice, the |tipi& ?-^?ly building that preceded Sir Arthur B1 ombeld s desio wa3 Th? cb, cf H" V !^f'Sap^ared- It was the same t rCJL Prompted the lay Im^ lr npT-hans °T Ttlle reRnmbent effigy cf a chance! icty the open air Wiiere the weather could beat it into obliterat'cm T> V + a,. pr,1(,t, T^l«-on. Tne memorie' brasses to bir xiugh Johnvs K"r.;™i,j. j H«&, hie wife, ,„.J nine VI >h scarcely greater veneration r they have been preserved in Som3 SSandw lV no doubt, occupy noaoured positCs^ building as records of the chivalrous enteD^e and pur- spiritual devotion which the past, whic.i will be m the futu-e, the our race.

THE EE-BUILDING MOVEMENT.

------THE NEW CHURCH.

CHANCELLOR SMITH.

CHANCELLOR SMITH'S PREDECESSOR.

ST. MARY'S PARISH IN THE NINETEENTH…

j | THE OFFERINGS.

PRINCIPAL DONATIONS.

PARISH OF ST. PETER'S, COCKETT.

A TRIBUTE TO CHANCELLOR SMITH.

AN APPRECIATION.

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FASHION NOTES.

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[No title]

A WESTERN ARCHBISHOPRIC

.-THE TYRANNY OF POPULAR CONTROL.

♦ DEVELOPMENT OF THE HARBOUR.

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—0 JOHN WESLEY'S a CHURCH-MANSHIFT

. CAE DUKE COLLIERY.

NOTES AND QUERIES. -.

NOTES.

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♦ DEVELOPMENT OF THE HARBOUR.