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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. HOUSE OP COMMONS, June 12, Sir W. tfraser called attention to a letter Ant by the secretary ot the Political ^ommittee ot the RefSrm Club to Mr. Ripley, the hon. •nember for Bradford, respecting his votes in divisions, and th ^ma*ed discussion ensued. Acting on the suggestion of we Premier, the motion for calling the secretary ot the com- nut tee to the bar of the House was withdrawn. T„^Jr- PIsraeli, n moving the Second Reading of the Appellate »o.i is ill which has come down from the Lords, pre- faced his explanation of its provisions by a narrative of the Progress of the question from the first introduction of Lord —atherley's Bill In 1872 and the Select Committee which sat i5»i With regard to this Bill, he pointed out that in riv'X: *hen Lord Selborne brought in his Judicature Bill, TV, i J?**rHS was opposed to the abolition of the Appellate urladlctlon of the Lords, but sacrificed his opinion in raer not to imperil an important reform of our Judica- So, also, when the present Government introduced its T" In 1874 and 1875, it drew them on the lines of the "iMcature Act of 1873 but a great change in public opinion had burred in the interval and it was found impossible to £ u.M This Bill proceeded on four principles—that the JUUmate Court of Appeal should be identical for the three jungdoms, that it should be an adequate Court of Appeal, fn 8hollld be continuous and economical The Apellate 'unctions of the House of Lords would be exercised by the ;~?*d Chancellor, the ex-Lord Chancellors, Peers who had neid high Judicial office, with two salaried Lords Ordinary of •PPeal with the rank of Baron. These two Lords would be increased to four gradually as the present salaried Judges of th Social Committee died; and they would sit both in r?e House of Lords and the Privy CounciL There would An" Judges added to the Intermediate Court of He recommended the Bill to the House not as a J £ »promlse, but as a result of the conviction of men ot all Inti* ^hat in this manner an efficient admiulstration of Justice could best be combined with that traditional Influ- ence and ii„i rriMmoto imuii "61.1.Z 8U "gUltI.A.I. 1/\1 iii Will. VA VI'Wou.&AlIW.n..t'k' lort discussion which preceded the Second Reading, nes and Sir W. Harcourt expatiated In sarcastic the Inconsistency of Lord Cairns and the Govern- irally, and insisted that, after all, the House of only retained In name. rten and Mr. Charley, on the other hand, con. ,t the Government had acted straightforwardly all owyer admired the Bill generally, but criticized e detail;, while Sir G. Campbell advised the im. ansfer to the Court of Appeal of two of the Judges ry Council; after which the Bill was read a second iy moved the second reading of the Oxford Univer- rhlch has also come down from the Lords, the main rhich, he explained, was to enable the rich Colleges he poor University to take all necessary steps for Dtlon of learning, not by destroying their in- e, but by connecting them more closely with the Mr. Hardy touched on many of the controversies 'e been raised by the Bill, and urged that a safe them might be expected from the discretion and of the Commissioners. Morgan, on the other hand, objected to the large powers intrusted to the Commissioners, and esolutiom complaining that the Bill does not sum- lne the principle and scope of the changes which mpowered to make in the University and Colleges. Bervey contended that no case had been made out rring the funds of the Colleges to the University, llfford (a Fellow of All Souls), describing himself 'he greatest abuses of a College which was sup- Ie behind the age, supported the princiole, and Government to strengthen the hands of the Com- Mr. Bristowe also made some remarks. e asked for some more satisfactory reasons than en given why the great experiment of 1854 should pted, when, as everybody knew, it was working ly; He objected, too, to giving such extraordinary a Commission, which he described as extremely a its composition, and he canvassed each of IN amid considerable laughter, finding some stion to every one of them. As to the main object -the endowment of the University at the expense He Fellowships"—Mr. Lowe declared that every ransferred from the Colleges to the University diverted from the encouragement of learning for t of laziness. llight pause, the Speaker was about to put the when Mr. Grant Duff moved the adjournment qate. Mr. Hardy objected to adjourn at so early 1 quarter past eleven o'clock-and Mr. Goschen adjournment was moved because no answer Severn to Mr. Lowe. To this the Chan- the Exchequer replied that Mr. Lowe's iswered itself, and it was not the present nt which' was responsible for disturbing the ex- of 1854, but the late Government, which had a Commission to Inquire Into the revenues, <fcc., of rsities. Moreover, Mr Gladstone had mentioned 'reform in his programme of 1874. 0ly, on the suggestion of Lord Hartlngton, It was that the further debate, if necessary, should be _he .Cambridge University Bill, which was fixed for lay, and the Bill was then read-a second time. iy Corps Training Bill and the Supreme Court of i (Ireland) Bill were read a second time. other Bills were forwarded a stage, and the House l at ten minutes past two o'clock.

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