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NEW SULTAN AND HIS FAMILY.

IING WEATHER-A WARNING.

AMERICAN EMIGRATION.

- CARRIAGE OF EXPLOSIVES.

iS OF WAR IN THE PHILADELPHIA…

TRADE IN AMERICA.

CHEMISTRY OF VEGETATION.

PERMISSIVE BILL DEMONSTRATION…

[No title]

THE BREMERHAVEN EXPLOSION.

A BOA CONSTRICTOR IN LONDON.

FRENCH VISITORS AT FOLKESTONE.

NATIONAL LIFEBOAT INSTITUTION.

THE OLD AND THE NEW SULTAN.

THE "COMING GIRL."

THE TRADE IN ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS.

COUNTERFEIT COINING.

GERMAN COAL AND IRON.

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GERMAN COAL AND IRON. Germany is becoming a formidable rival to this country in the production of two of the most important articles of commerce, viz., coal and iron. Where ten or fifteen years ago, the principal seaports of Germany drew their chief supplies of coal from England, the proportien of British and German fuel so consumed is now less than half; while in the interior, and especially in the Westphalian and Rhenish coal-producing dis- tricts, German coal is almost exclusively used. Reports from British consuls in German towns unanimously assert that this falling off in the consumption of British coal in Germany is owing in a very great measure to the high price which has lately been maintained. Ger- man coal is much inferior to our own produce, being softer, and more liable to rapid deterioration; but its price is so low as to more than compensate for the want of economy in its use. The German rail- ways have reeently reduced their rate for the carriage of native coal, and thus given a great impetus to the colliery interest. It seems, therefore, to be a question of price, whether England is to retain G-srmany as customer for her black diamonds" or whether she is to lose the benefit of her orders. The English article will always have the preference on account of its superior quality but, in the days of competition espe- cially, low prices will always rule the market. As with coal, so it is with iron. The manufacture of iron in Germany has lately progressed with such great strides that the imports from abroad have been seriously de- pressed, and though on January 1, 1877, the duty on foreign iron will be abolished, and such a remission is generally followed by a large increase in the import of any article, it is hardly anticipated that the trade will revive. Within the last two or three years the imports of British iron, manufactured and unmanu- factured, into the principal German ports, have fallen some 50 and 75 per cent. On the contrary, the ex- ports have increased in some cases 100 per cent. The number of iron mines in Germany in 1871 was 1,228, producing 4,000,000 tons of iron. In 1873 the number bad risen to over 1,500, and the produce to 6,000,000. The year 1874 saw a relapse in the trade which had thus suddenly grown to such dimensions. This col- lapse was mainly owing to the fact that the markets became overstocked, and natural stagnation ensued. But the manufacture of iron ware has gone on steadily increasing, and, instead of importing, Germany is able to take her place as a considerable exporter of iron ware.-Globe.

LIQUOR SELLING IN NEW YORK.

TREASURE IN FRANCE.

SELECTED ANECDOTES.

THE MARKETS. -

STEAM TRAM-CARS.