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CURRENT SPORT.

I TWO GREAT STRIKES.

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VICAR AS LABOURER. I

THE ALLEGED MATRICIDE. I

,QUARANTINED PRISONER. I

ICHASED FOR SIX MONTHS. I

I CORNERING BRITISH POTTERY.

MR. CHAMBERLAIN AND CHINESE…

J THE GENERAL ELECTION.

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MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL'S I…

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MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL'S I BREAKDOWN. Mr. Winston Churchill's dramatic breakdown in the House of Commons last week end during the Trades' Union debate has naturally caused a con- siderable amount of anxiety among his friends. Mr. Churchill may not be universally popular as a politician, but everybody recognises that he is a power to be reckoned with in the future. Inquiries made on Sunday go to prove that there is no serious trouble to aceount for his sudden and complete loss of memory. Mr. Churchill spent the dav out of town. The inability of Mr. Winston Churchill to con- tinue his speech in the House of Commons is by no means an isolated instance of lost speeches on the part of hon. members. A certain gentleman who sat in Parliament some years ago for one of the divisions of Leeds was so lavish in getting away beforehand to the reporters the full text of a speech he was about to deliver that he on rising to make the speech found he had quite unwittingly given away his own copy. The consequence was:a halting address quite differ- ent from that which appeared in the papers the next day. It is told of the late Right Hon. W. E. Forster that on rising to deliver a statement full of facts, which he had marked down in due order, he couldn't find the document anywhere. A cabby who on one occasion drove a stout, elderly gentleman to the House of Commons found soon after he had dropped his fare a heavy bundle of type-written matter on the floor of the hansom. He drove back rapidly to the House and made for one of the officials, as the documents had no name on them. Soon through the lobby went the cry, "Anybody lost a speech?" It proved to be the property of Sir William Harcourt, who gave the man a sovereign for his trouble. But on another occasion of this sort, a member who did not own the speech claimed it, and kept it back from Sir Gilbert Greenall, to whom it belonged, till just before the House was rising. In point of fact, the speech-which is said to be one of the very few that Sir Gilbert ever intended to deliver—was never heard. j

DEATH OF MR. FRED MACCABE.…

THE WRECKED SUBMARINE.

i MARRIAGE OF LORD INGESTRE.

IFATHER'S DOUBLE MURDER.

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iTHE POPE'S DOCTOR. I

I KILLED BY KURDS.I

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ART AND LITERATURE. -