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POET'S CORNER.

The Road to Love

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COLDS IN MAY.

FOR THE YOUNG FOLKS,

FOR MATRON AND MAID.¡

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FOR MATRON AND MAID. ¡ HABITS THAT IRRITATE. There is one habit that the overworked house- wife should bo on her guard to check. Bite your tongue, if need be, whistle, sing, do any- thing to stop talking just as soon as you note that <=> you are making swift strides toward the habit of nagging. 1 For so sure as you give this vicious habit ho very least bit of an inch it will take an ell. fore you really think of the matter. there you are "Why didn't you do this in place of t-hat ?" or "You never can do anything right." Then you begin laying miles and furlongs and rods by the inch toward the deep sea of domestic unhappiness. Your children will learn to deceive you, be- cause they cannot stand being found faub with so much. Your husband may find that e too can form the habit of finding fault with your management. And where will then le any chance of a home, in the real sense of the WOIU, when these conditions exist? TRUTHFULNESS. A good father's love and understanding has been the force that has shaped many a child's life for noble ends, and he should accept his responsibilities as the greatest opportune y life has offered him for influence, power and suc- cess. One of the principal duties of a parent to a child is the duty of absolute truthfulness. No father or mother, under whatever circum- stances, can ever find justification for the slightest deviation from this rule. To promise a believing little child something impossible of fulfilment is absolutely wrong. To exaggerate, state falsely, unduly emphasise, speak deliberately what is not true, for what- r ever ends, are faults that may destroy the char- acter of the child, wholly innocent as he is by nature of deception. THE HOME ATMOSPHERE. Every home has a decided "atmosphere" (the sweet flower of environment) and our intuition is as likely to letf us know, as soon as we enter it. the principal: characteristics of the family life. In studying the ideal home, that homo which presents the best kind of environment, the first thing to be conscious of, probably before all else, is that the place be a place of rest. It must be "livable." It must be peaceful. THE WISHING MOON. 0 golden crescent gleaming bright Upon the sombre breast of night, A promise of the things to be Throughout tho month of destiny. I see you waxing strong each day, While sullen tides your will obey, And pile themselves in frantic flow Or back recede in ebbing slow. o new moon on the breast of night Keep faith with me as grows your light, And as you're followed by the sea So let my true love come to me. FOR SUMMER SEWING. A clever woman has found tnat when sho makes buttonholes in soft muslins it is a very good idea to rub a little paste, made of flour and water; on the wrong side. This will give a firm surface to work upon, and obviates the possibility of cutting a button-hole too lar^e. Of course, the paste will not discolour the fabric. TO SAVE THE SLIPPERS For the very fine slipper, whose softness needs little more than the old-time stuffing- of crum- pled tissue paper, there is a home-made spreader that will save the price of a shoe-tree. Take a pair of long, covered steels, those that come for boning corsets. Cover them with puffed ribbon or silk, and stick one end of each into a tight ball of cotton, also covered with gathered ribbon or silk. This ball should be big enough to fill the vamp of the slipper, and should be securely sewed to the steel. Finally, it is to be placed in the slipper's toe, after which the other end of the steel is sprung into the heel. FRILLS OF FASHION. Endeavours are being made to bring brocade? f into fashion. Novelties in table linen show round table- cloths. Gathered gauze and gathered satin are both being used extensively for millinery. Many of the thinnest summer materials have a satiny sheen. Embroidered chantilly lace is made up into 1 guimpes and sleeves. White cotton dress materials are sprinkled with dots. The hand-embroidered linen sunshade will I figure in many a wardrobe. Appliqued roseleaves ornament the more elaborate shades. Many long coats have buckles instead of but- tons. If the cloak is arranged to fasten on one side, the buckle is large and barbaric. Polonaise gowns are often finished on the should, rs with little buckles. One new style of guimpe is of fine spotted net two or three tones lighter than the gown. Hugo hats to match the guimpes of gowns help to make up some extremely smart toilete. Curiously toned pink flowers are mixed with the delicate spring greens for millinery pur- poses. i HINTS FOR THE HOME. I A little ground almonds mixed through a fruit cake will prevent the fruit from sinking to the bottom. Orange peel dried and grated makes a very fine yellow powder that is delicious flavouring for cakes and puddings. Soorched Goods.—Saturate scorched part in milk, and then spread thickly with salt. Leave for an hour or so and then wash off in cold water. The half of a spanish onion rubbed well into damaged part also removes scorch. Corks as Knobs.—When knobs from cooking utensils are broken or have been lost, replace them with cork by putting a screw through from inside, letting it come up close and tight. Screw a cork on outside. The corks will not loosen. Fig Pudding (from recipe by a celebrated chef) .-20z. butter, 2oz. sugar, two eggs, ilb. chopped figs, loz. breadcrumbs, loz. flour, juice of a lemon. Cream up butter and sugar, add eggs slowly, cream again until quite smooth, then add all other ingredients, and stir lightly together. Steam in buttered mould one hour. Pic-nic tartlets are popular, and easily made. Beat an egg with 2oz. of castor sugar to a cream, flavour with orange-flower water and a little nutmeg. Old 3oz. of fresh butter, and whisk it into the mixture. Line tins with puff paste, fill them with the mixture, place a pre- served cherry on each and bake in a, moderate oven. To prevent large buttons pulling material of a coat place a small flat button exactly under- neath on the inside, and firmly sew the two to- gether. The button will then stay on as long as the coat is worn. This saves much trouble in preventing buttops from becoming loose, and perhaps lost, besides pulling holes in material, as they are likely to when sewn on in the or- dinary way. Powdered brick dust and paraffin is an excel- lent braes polish. Take half-pint of powdered brick dust to three-quarters of a pint of para- ffin -1 mix together in a bottle. Shake well be- fore using, apply with soft flannel, and polish. Also whiting and paraffin are very good. For very fine brass use crocus powder and turps; about same quantity of each, mixed together and used in the usual way. To clean straw matting take a dish half full of hot water, a perfectly clean, long-handled mop, and some dry Indian meal. Sweep all the dust off the matting, then scatter the dry meal evenly over the room, wring the mop very dry. and rub hard. Take one breadth at a time, always lengthwise, of the straw. Use clean hot water for each breadth. When quite dry the meal can be swept off easily. Tongue au Gratin.-Take the remains of a boiled tongue, when it is too shabby to come to table, and cut them in small pieces, remov- ing the skin. Havo two or three boiled eggs, according to the quantity of tongue; butter a fireproof dish, sprinklo it with breadcrumbs, and put in the tongue and hard-boiled eggs in slices. Scatter grated cheese over, continue until full, pour in a little stock and lastly cover with bread-crumbs, with a few bits of butter on the top. Bake till brown, then serve.

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FUN AND FANCY.I

The Road to Love