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WAR NEWS-

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THE THIRD BATTLE OF PLEVNA.

THE WHEAT CROP.

THE TURKISH ARMY IN THE BALKANS.

HOSPITAL SATURDAY IN LONDON.

THE RELIEF OF THE DISTRESS…

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CRICKET AS A CIVILISER.

THE SULTAN AND THE ARMENIANI…

EMIGRATION TO AMERICA.

RUSSIAN COLONISATION OF NOVA…

SELECTED ANECDOTES.

THE WAR AND ITS ATROCITIES.

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THE WAR AND ITS ATROCITIES. The following is an extract from a X aval Correspondent of The Times, writing from the head-quarters of the Turkish Army of the Balkans:- Yesterday we were invited by Suleiman Pacha to go and see a village that had within the last week been the scene of a frightful massacre by the Bulga- rians, aided, it is said, by Cossacks, but of this, though I believe it myself, I cannot vouch for the truth. I trust that you will have received my telegram about this affair, which, through the courtesy of the Commander-in-Chief, I was enabled to send by tL field telegraph to Constantinople for transmission co England. As it was necessary to translate it into Turkish, and that very hurriedly, it is possible there may be some slight discrepancy between what I saw and know to be true and what may eventually have reached you, after the terrible operation of translation from English into Turkish here, from Turkish into French at Therapia, and then again into English for England. The scene of this last massacre is a village called Offlandlik, or Uffiana, about half way between this and Kezanlik, and consequently very near to the Russian lines at the latter place. It was a most flourishing village or town, and probably contained upwards of 3,500 inhabitants, many of them, judging from the few houses that remain standing, being very well to do. It appears that through all the time of the Russian occupation of the Hain these people were left un- molested, which must, in fairness, be borne in mind, and the dates of these affairs have in almost every in- stance gone to prove that the actual presence of the Russian Army proper has acted as a temporary shield for the unhappy Mahomedan population from the re- venge of the Bulgarians. Offlandlik is no exception to this rule as far as I can ascertain by the most careful investigation. From the 14th of July to the 8th or 9th of August the Russian Armj, or detachments of it, were within a few miles of the seven or eight villages of the Valley of the Tundja, which have since been destroyed and the people massacred. During that time, so far as I can learn, the massacres which were perpetrated by the Bulgarians were in places where it is now certain the regular Russian Army never appeared. At Offlandlik I have the most positive evidence that this was the case, for the bodies of the dead were plainly victims of only a few days, from four to six at the outside, and I can most positively assert that the death of one young woman could only have occurred two or three days ago at the furthest. It is painful and revolting to give one's reasons for being thus able to fix the date, but I must briefly say that the flesh which was still adhering to the almost skeleton remains and which had not been devoured by the dogs was quite fresh-looking, while the upper part of the body was very little discoloured. I can never forget that woman's face. I was accompanied by the Correspondent of the Daily Telegraph, and by our servants, as well as by a Turkish Major and an escort of two or three soldiers. We all stood round that awful sight without saying a word. Her face, which the dogs had respected and left intact, was most strikingly beautiful, with a delicacy of outline and perfect contour of cheek and chin that was only heightened by the pallor of death. Her mouth which was small and beautifully formed, was slightly open and her teeth visible, her eyes closed, and long fringed lashes lying on her cheek. There was just a faint expression of pain on the forehead, and her hair was lying all round her head like a rich brown wavy halo. She was entirely nude, and her throat had been cut with one clean deep cut which must have severed the jugular and windpipe immediatdly. We also found the remains of women and children in a well. How many there were it was difficult to say, as we did not get them up. But they must have been numerous, and I am inclined to believe the story of a poor trembling old woman who accompanied us to the spot that there were twelve or fifteen women in the well. The story of all the people who escaped, and who have repeated it at different times, is that the Bulgarians, with a few Cossacks—some say two Cossack officers-came to the village some ten or twelve days ago, after the retreat of the Regular Army. They appear to have collected all the young women and children in one or two large houses, to have taken all the men outside the village and shot them, and to have continued pillaging and burning, and occasionally killing anybody they found. All accounts agree that the unhappy girls and young women, who were kept prisoners in these houses, were daily and hourly ravished, that fifteen of them were killed, and that a very large number were taken away to the mountains, when the Bulgarians retreated on the advance of Suleiman Pasha's army. We had no time to make any further searches we were a long distance from the camp, half way between the two armies, with night coming on, and the plain full of marauding Bashi-Bazouks and Circassians, who would any of them murder their best friend for five francs. On our way home we came across upwards of 120 dead Turks, who had all been massacred by bayonet or sword or shot suddenly. They were lying in groups, in one place 40, another 50, and two or three smaller parties. Among these was one woman. That these men were slaughtered in cold blood there can be no reason to doubt. There were several very old men among them. But how or by whom, and whether it was by Cossacks or Bulgarians these men were killed there was no evidence, and beyond the mere fact that they are lying there dead and were Turks everything is mere conjecture.

THE TREES AND BOULEVARDS OF…

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