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LANCASHIRE AND THE DEE FISHERIES.¡…

A LUNATIC'S HALLUCINATIONS.…

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THE EXTENSION OF THE CITY.

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THE EXTENSION OF THE CITY. SALTNET STANDS ALOOF. A meeting of the ratepayers of the East Ward of Saltney was held at the Wood Memorial Schools on Monday night, for the purpose of discussing the proposed incorpora- tion of the ward with the city of Chester. There was a fairly good attendance—half an hour after the meeting was advertised to commence—and Mr. John Jones presided. The CHAIRMAN, after explaining the objects of the meeting, said it seemed that the Town Council of Chester had cast a wistful eye upon a certain part of Saltney, and he believed they intended shortly to take action to induce the Local Government Board to authorise them to connect the ward with the city and borough. The question was whether those who inhabited the neighbourhood were willing or otherwise, because he believed it would depend in a great measure on the voice of the people who inhabited those parts as to whether Chester would be allowed to incorporate them within their boundary. He had heard a rumour that it was doubtful if Chester would at once proceed with the scheme, but they should be prepared. They would be very sorry to lose the east ward or part of it from Saltney, which was small enough at present. He believed Saltney would improve if they were left as they were. Mr. COPE wanted to know how far the boundary would go.—It was stated that it would extend to Stone Bridge. Mr. T. DAVIES moved that they as ratepayers of Saltney instruct the committee, whoever they might appoint, to do all in their power to prevent them from being joined to Chester. He believed that if they were taken into Chester their rates would be doubled, for the rates in Chester were now 4s. 8d.,andin Saltney 2s. 4d. They could not expect property owners would have their rates doubled and their rents remain as they were. The tenants would have to bear the burden. Pro- perty owners now paying say 12s. for rates would have to pay 24s., and they would put another 3d. a week on the rent, and this would bring them in 13s. Again, they would like to have a good sewerage system in Saltney. Chester had got a sewer laid down for the other part of Saltney, but they would tind that the sewerage of the houses on the other side were in no better condition than those on their side. He had noticed on the other side a great deal of tyranny with- reference to the school attendance officer. If a child missed two half days from school, the parent was dragged up to Chester about it, but the man on their side was a man of common sense, and their children went to school as regularly as on the other side, without having the tyranny to put up with. Speaking of the im- provements in Chester, he said that most of the improvements has taken place within a stone's throw of the Town Hall. The outskirts were as they were twenty years ago, so far as improvements were concerned, and they would find the slums and alleys as they were ten years ago. They were beautifying a few places, and were proposing to have splendid baths, which would be no good to Saltney even if they were incorporated. It had been hinted that they should have their public-houses open. He thought it they united with Chester the next day the public-houses would remain the same. Flintshire would still be Flintshire, and thus they would come under the Sunday Closing Act. Mr. COPE seconded the motion. In answer to a question, the CHAIRMAN said he did not think the public-houses would be open on the Sunday. He did not think the Local Government Board would be able to alter the boundary between England and Wales. Mr. EDWARD MIDDLETON, who thought the public-houses would be open on Sundays if the incorporation was accomplished, proposed, as an amendment, that the east ward be incorporated. It was time it had been done, and it was a pity it was not incorporated ten years ago. The other side of the boundary might be in as bad a condition as theirs, but was the city of Chester going to put it right for the benefit of the east ward ? Chester was holding back to get that part before doing so. Property owners in Chester would have to pay equal rates with the pro- perty owners of Saltney, they would have the i place thoroughly drained, and they would have lamps at proper distances. At present, if they had a storm, they were up to their ankles in water.—A Voice: The drains are as good as on the other side.—Mr. Middleton: You have no drains. In the opinion of Mr. BLAKE it was not a ques- question of money. Money was 'mere rot' unless they had comfort with it,and why should they not have in Saltney accommodation they had in the backwoods of Africa? (Laughter.) There people could move if things did not suit them, but in Saltney they were permanent. He asked them did it stand to sense and reason as intelligent men that they could not f get shut' w«r Their sanitary arrangements nkrhfTn^ T7 m mighfc SO to bed one night and open his eyes next morning to find one of his family laid low. The drainage of one house might be quite right, that of his neigh- bour just the opposite. Let them go to Chester and they would be told Saltney was a reproach. They had some of the princes of the nation living among them. There was the old gentleman, Mr. Gladstone. leeming thousands came from all parts of the universe to see the veteran, and it was a beau- tiful road they had to go en. (Laughter.) The road was drained into the houses. (Laughter.) Let the approaches fit, and let it not be a reproach in other towns and foreign lands to be cried shame on. Then there was the Duke living near, and thousands came over through that, and in Saltney they had not a bit of foot- path for them to walk on. If they did not want to go over to Chester, they should put their hands down in order to get an efficient system of drainage. He seconded the amend- ment. Mr. FELL said he had served on the Parish Council and the Parochial Committee. Their efforts had not brought anything from the District Council. He would support to his utmost the incorporation of that part of Saltney with Chester. He considered the part from the railway crossing to Stone Bridge was in a most unsatisfactory condition. Suppose a serious epidemic broke out in Saltney, it was his duty as representing Mold Junction to protest against any resolu- tion against joining Chester, because epidemic might easily spread to Mold Junction. He had served twelve months on the Saltney Parochial Committee, and they had made representations to the district council for improvements, and the district council had g,' while the parish council had let the parochial committee die a natural death, The district council promised they would carry out certain improvements in west Saltney, and they had done nothing, and the drains in east Saltney were in a filthy state. If Chester took them over, they would have increased facilities in regard to efficient sanitation, and a good water supply to every house. He did not see why property owners should be antagonistic to the inclusion of the district, simply because if the improvements were made, the land would be taken up for building purposes they would be able to build good houses, and to throw their refuse into good drains. They had asked the district council to carry water to each place, and they would not do it until the matter was carried to the County Council when, like a naughty boy, they asked to b allowed to do it. They had not done it. Altogether the advantages they would gain would more than compensate them for any hIgher rates they would have to pay. Hitherto all their efforts on the Parish Council had been frustrated by a superior Council. Mr. YOUD thought the Town Council of Chester should have placed a definite scheme before them. Speaking of the sanitary arrangements of Saltney, he said that the sewer ventilators in the streets of Chester were enough to kill a rat, much less a human being. (Laughter.) At the same time there was a wide margin for improvements in their district. He scarcely thought the District Council had done £25 worth of improvements during the last 25 years. He had been watching Mr. W. H. Churton's career for some time in regard to this matter, and he thought that gentleman was something like a weather-cock. He had taken up the matter of the inclusion of Saltney, and now he said No because there would be some expense. He did not think of that during the Sluices Bill business. Mr. FELL thought it was premature for Chester to prepare a scheme. Mr. DAVIES said the sanitary condition of the streets on the other side of Saltney was worse than on their side. The CHAIBMAN, in answer to Mr. Youd, said the scheme of Chester was that of incorporation. They had trusted the District Council, it was for them to say if I they would try the Town Council. Mr. YOUD said Chester possessed sewerage works which they wanted to bring lower down for Saltney to have the fumes. (Laughter.) If they joined Chester, they would have no redress, if they kept aloof they would have their redress. Mr. WOODHOUSE also opposed the incorpora- tion. On being put to the meeting, 18 voted against incorporation and 11 for. The motion was thus carried. Messrs. Manifold and Davies were elected dolegates for the conference on the subject.

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