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-----MALT DEFEATED BY BARLEY!

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"MY GRANDFATHER WAS A PERSON…

GREAT FIRE 'LE.

ILATTER-DAY SAINTS' CONFERENCE.

LIFE ON BOARD AN AMERICAN…

--AN EMIGRANT'S SUCCESS.

COMPARATIVE POPULATIONS.

HAVING A SPLENDID TIME OF…

GREAT FIRE AT BRUNSWICK.

THE RECENT JAPANESE EXECUTION.

AN INTERESTING CEREMONY.

SPIRIT-RAPPING IN PARIS.

MURDER AND ATTEMPTED SUICIDE

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SEVENTY THOUSAND MEN THROWN…

MURDER OF A WIFE.

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The Times, in a leader upon this dreadful affair, says:— At last the deed was done, and thsn he seemed rather sorry for it, having perhaps worked himself sober but his grief did not prevent him from sitting down uy the bed on which the body lay and smoking « In which hii neighbour Anderson quietly Joined him. These, however, strange to ° most revolting features of the case. tU £ ^nd¥e^ndi £ rn^»^ are they are actually less calculated to kindle indignation than thoaa still to be detailed. The pitman mustered preUrthicWy at the Spen. There w "h cokmy of em. We hear their houses spoksn of as t ci ow, and a dozen men and women came uetore us in the scene. et in all this num ber of these Strong men there was not one who dared to im SS arm In defence of this poor woman. It Was not that they arm in defence of this poor woman. Tt J? V I were ignorant of what was going on far 2SE It was not that they held' lHe rhIn « lightly of murder. They held back f mm Atkinson threatenad tbem. He fWi^S ♦v t ..°2War(^c^ srxirc?' s-.tsa ss that we quote^WrriVfi". °ae man—11 u 11,8 own evidence Then there w^T»^'? Atkinson start to thrash his wife." thesonndrrfHi Jlnghng of flreirons;" then a luU, then 01 WL°ws again, then the woman cried "Oh!" a v.r^v?r* ?n,?,8.°> continues the witness, I went out to my K j'it0 hi m what Arklnson was doing." Another man looked through the upstairs window and heard him thrashing ner and swearing he would kill her. "This," he adds, "con. tinued very near an hour, and he proceeds to say, "after thrashing her a long time he came out and went into Bella Hall's. 1 thought it was done, and I went to bed again." A third man actually went into the house while the murder was going on, saw blows Inflicted, and heard the poor woman cry out, Oh dear, Mat, I'm not dead yet 1" He cried "Shame 1" he says, on the murderer, and tried to pacify him and keep him down; but then he toUa us i — ■ — he'" tbat Atkinson wcnld hurt him, and so In toeethV H1,6 ar,d thtn weot out Two others went with hta wif«V nd Ue niul(lerer fitting on the flocr, hand Th^v «i^D?iacross hls lep aBd tbe ton88 ready to his blm uke tbe ton RE and strike her, when ..>,« <? °*Jler to go and take them away from him. But Atkinson ordered them out of the home," and on his promise that he would "let her alone" they went out, when be followed them to the door, threatened to shoot tbeTTi if they interfered apaln, and resumed hill occupation. We do not know what foreipmers may think of this story but we must say, for the credit of Englishmen that we believe the like of it was never reported before. Here are a number of big, Btuidy men—seven actually gave evidence on the trial—who allow a woman to be kiiled by inches before their eyes without daring to stay the arm of the murderer. lIe tells them that he will kill them too it they come near him and they stand aloof. The Judge reflected in strong language on the craven spirit wnicll had permLted thi8 outrage, and on the" want of manliness wblch so many persons had exhibited. That the poor woman's life could have been saved by the least demonstration of courage or spirit is as clear as possible, yet these men did not dare do evenin a body what any policeman would not hesitate to de single- handed any day of his life. It was but closing with a frantic drunkard, and the thing was done; but ths murderer was allowed to go on for an hour and a half till hb hai fV his work, become a little penitent, and very c.w. We have heard of some such things in Ireland, but there the connivance was either the ezprestlon of secret sympathies or the result of organised terrorism. We never heard of a man beating his wife to pieces, In an Irish village while his next neighbours looked on without daring to iuterfere. We trust we may never again hear of sucaa thing in England, and we should much like to know whether, lD the six montbs that have elapsed since this sense ? ot the sPeu have been brought to any Are there conduct hy those who should instruct them, nnniilatioifin the ^rlct through which the St to"eel to some «""lctlon of their duties, or bv snch a Eiame-for their default ? The spectacle presented by such a is not pleasant to look upon, but some improvement we hope may ultimately result from the exposure.

AN EXPOSURE OF THE DAVENPORT…

A MUDDLE IN THE HOUSE!

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THE MARKETS.