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t Mr Ward Beecher has refused the proffered increase of salary from 12,500 to 20,000 dollars. Archdeacon Mackenzie, the Suffragan Bishop of Nottingham, was consecrated last week. The Bishops of Lichfield and Here- ford, and four others took part in the ceremony, and the Greek Archbishop was present. Bishop Wilberforce has been presented with a pastoral staff at Basingstoke. The design was selected by him, and consists of an ebony staff with crook and bosses of silver and silver gilt, richly engraved and studded with amethysts, carbuncles and onyxes, the arms of the See also being engraved on it by the Bishop's express desire. The Rev. James Bailey, who has for five years been minister of the Congregational church at Broughty Ferry, has resigned his pastorate. In a letter to his congregation he states that his motive for resigning his ministry is "to seek a sphere of occupa- tion in the world of commerce which would give scope to the energies of his youthful manhood, and not require that he should be the organ of theological opinions which he has out- grown." The presentation to the vicarage of St. Modwen's, Burton-on- Trent, now vacant, is the gift of the Marquis of Anglesea; but the churchwardens have been informed, by letter from his lord- ship's agent, that the noble patron had determined to freely and unreservedly leave the selection in the hands of the church- wardens and congregation, believing that that course will be most advantageous to all concerned. The Archbishop of York writes to the Times to say that he was not aware, until he saw it announced in the newspapers, that the address presented to the Greek Archbishop in his pre- sence, on Saturday emanated from the Church Union. Had he been previously informed of the nature of the addressâwhich was described to him as being from some inhabitants of York âhis Grace would not, he says, have been able to take any part in the proceedings. A letter from Rome in the Debate says that the Pope is very anxious for the proceedings of the Council to terminate as soon as possible. "Some people think," adds the writer, "that the cause of this is the expense occasioned by maintaining such a large number of bishops. I do not believe that such is the real motive; for the Holy Father has received from the universal episcopacv ten times more money than he would spend for that purpose during a year's stay of the bishops; but the uncertainty he is in with regard to the definition of his favourite dogma makes him desirous of obtaining a speedy solutiou. Under no circumstances is it considered that the Council will be prolonged beyond next June." The 11 Daily News," commenting upon the appearance of the Greek Archbishop Lycurgus at several ecclesiastical ceremonies in this country, saysâ" Far be it from us to allege there are no reasons why the members and rulers of the Greek Church should not be treated with Christian charity but when we look at the great questions which divide the Greek Church from the Church of England, and then remark the very slight differences which separate our Protestant Nonconformists from the Estab- lishment, we cannot but ask why this difference of treatment ? And at a time when important practical legal and social distinc- tions are based upon the different positions of churchmen and dissenters, our archbishops and bishops must expect that this question will be pressed." A remarkable memorial has been addressed to Mr Gladstone upon the subject of the Indelibility of Holy Orders. Between thirty and forty clergymen unite to point out to the Prime Min- ister the hardship under which men labour who have taken holy orders, and who wish to retire from the ministry of the Church of England for reasons valid to themselves, "whether they are disinclined to accept its form of government, or its relation to the State, or its dogmatic teaching; or whether, from any change in the circumstances of their lives, they are no longer able conscientiously to discharge the duties of their office." Among the names appended to the memorial are some of the most eminent in the scholarship and in the higher intellectual literature of England. We may mention those of Mr Froude, the historian; Professor Brewer, of King's College Mr Munro', the Professor of Latin at Cambridge Mr Leslie Stephen; Pro- fessor Jowett; Mr W. G. Clark, late Public Orator at Cambridge; and Professor Thorold Rogers. In the Court of Arches on Thursday week, Sir R. Phillimore gave judgment in two important ritualist cases. The Dean of Arches said the case of "The Bishop of Winchester v. Wix came by letters of request from the court of the diocese of Winchester, and the late bishop still continued the promoter of the next. The articles had reference to lighted candles on the communion table when they were not required for giving light during the communion service. With respect to one of the articles in con- nection with light it was alleged that Mr Wix had discontinued the practice immediately after becoming the minister, but Mr Wix raised as a plea that the practice was lawful. He was glad that the matter had come before the court in that form, ana he (the dean) declared that the practice was unlawful, and ad- monished him not to return to the practice. The next articles had reference to incense, and on this point he referred at some length to the evidence relating to processions, incensing, and other practices which were witnessed on the several Sundays. He was bound to pronounce that the incensing and lighted candles were illegal, and he regretted that Mr Wix did not obey altogether, as h^did in part, tne admonitions of his diocesan. He must admonish him to abstain from such practices in future, and must condemn him in the costs of each proceeding. In the case of Colonel Elphinstone v. the Rev. J. Purchas, the Dean of Arches decided that it was unlawful for Mr Purchas to wear, or allow to be worn, a 'cope.' whether at morning or evening service, or at any time, save when celebrating the Communionâ also to wear or permit certain other vestments, especially 'maniples,' which it appeared had been worn by one of Mr Purchas's clergy. The judge also decided that the processions were unlawful, and admonished Mr Purchas to desist from them. He also admonished him to abstain from lighted candles, prostration, elevations, and incense. He did not think that it was unlawful to use wine mixed with water at the Communion Service; provided that it had been mixed beforehand, and that the mixing was no part of the ceremony.' The introduction of a model figure of the infant Saviour was illegal, as also it was illegal to have the Communion-table uncovered. The kneeling of the priests in the Cousecration Prayer was illegal. Mr Purchas was condemned in costs for the offences proved. The language of the judgment was extremely mild. The Church As- sociation, on the part of Colonel Elphinstone, have given notice by their Proctors, Messrs Moore and Currey, of their intention to appeal to the Judicial Committee against the decision in the case of Mr Purchas. The great point will be the legality of vest- ments as held by the Dean of Arches, and on other subjects not allowed by his lordship. The appeal cannot be heard for some months. In the other case, reported in "Bishop Sumner v. the Rev. R. H. E. Wix," the Proctor, Mr Brooks, for the defendant, has intimated that he does not intend to appeal to the Judicial Committee. The promoters of the suit against the Rev. W. J. E. Bennett, vicar of Frome, have determined, it is said, not to abandon it, and the necessary notices for an appeal against Sir Robert Phillimore's jucgment have been given to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. It is not expected that the case can be heard during the present sittings. In that case it will go over to the sittings after Easter term.

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LECTURE "BY MR D. DAVIES AT…

THE NEW SHERIFFS.

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