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f ---.tj., CARNARVON.

INFRINGING THE SUNDAY CLOSING…

ANOTHER CASE FROM PONTLYFNI.

DENBIGH.

CONWAY.

LLANDUDNO.

BANGOR.

[No title]

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J THE NORTH WALES COLLEGE.

DEATH OF OAYAIN ALAW. ;

EVADING THE LIVERPOOL POLICE…

THE MOON AND HER INFLUENCE…

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THE MOON AND HER INFLUENCE ON THE WEATHER. In all lunar affections allowance must 1. e made for retardation or acceleration, the retarding force being in operation while tie moon goes from syzygy (new or ftill) to quadrature and the acceler- ating while she goes from quadrature syzygy; hence the full effect of a lunar aspect is sometimes noi felt until 36 hours have elapsed (as in the case of the ocean tides), the time of retardation varying with circumstances. When this is not taken into account, the system cannot be properly worked. To give an illustration, in Mr Proctor's paper, "Knowledge," a member of the Royal Astro- nomical Society in February last endeavoured to show that no reliance could be placed in lunar influence on the weather, by giving the result of his observations during three months, in which atmospheric changes only rarely coincided with lunar aspect; but the fact was, no allowance had been made for retardation or acceleration, and on a careful scanning of the dates in question it was found that the change came almost invariably within the time due. This shows the danger of condemning a system on a superficial knowledge of its principles. Of course, when the barometer is exceptionally high or low, the change may be only threatened, or very slight, being counter- acted by other, and for the time more potent influences. Before leaving the subject, it may be interesting to give the following extract bearing on lunar influence from an article on "Temperature," by M. de Parville in the Journal des Debate of August, 1881:â"A very long series of observations has also shown that the moon, which passes every month from one hemisphere to the other, influ- ences the direction of the great atmospheric cur- rents. The changes in those currents in conse- quence of the prevailing moisture or dryness, are intimately connected with the relative position for the time being of the sun and moon. The distance of the moon from the equator, that is the in. clination of the moon's path to the plane of the equator, varies every year, passing from a maximum toamlnmium limit; and the meteorological character of a series of years appears to be m, ainly depen- dent upon the charge of inclination when those extreme limits have been touched. Observations prove that the rainy years, the cold winter and hot summers, return periodically and coincide with certain declinations of the moon. In our latitudes the rainy years occur when the moon's declination has touched its extreme limits of 28, 26, or 18 degrees respectively. They are separated from each other usually by periods of about three and then six years. Consequently dry summers occur in the years when the moon's greatest declination is about the mean, i., 21 and 23 degrees. ORION.

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IPROCTER'S AND CTOT^AL NEW:-…

GERMANY AND DUXAIASK.

REPRESENTATION OF POET ARLINGTON.

THE DANUBIAN COMMISSION.

IRISH LAND QUESTION.

ACTION AGAINST THE " WORLD."

MISCELLANEOUS.

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NORTHERN WELSH FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION.