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I.THE BRAS'S AND EARTHENWARE…

. THE DISABILITIES OF SEAMEN.

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THE DISABILITIES OF SEAMEN. MR. J. HAVELOCK WILSON, M.P., AT BARRY. Mr J. Havelock Wilson, the seamen's M.P., the president of the National Sailors and Firemen's Union, visited Barry on Monday evening last, and addressed a crowded meeting at the Assembly- room of the Victoria Hall, Barry Docks. Mr E. Cathery, general secretary of the Union, presided, and in opening stated that the seafaring class had been treated up to the present by the Government as if they were dogs, not being privileged with the same laws as workmen ashore. If a seaman was not worth 3s a day, he was not worth a brass farthing and it would be a grand thing if every man—as in the olden days-was obliged to show his Union ticket before entering the shipping office. However, Mr Cathery could see bright times ahead, and he hoped before the end of the year the Workmen's Compensation Act would be extended for their benefit. (Cheers.) Mr Morgan Morgan, B.A.L., Cardiff, stated, in a short address, that he was satisfied that through the efforts of Mr Wilson and other sympathisers, the Compensation Act would soon be extended to seamen. Many reforms were required for seamen, reforms, he ventured to say, which would have been carried through had it not been for the un- faithfulness of the seamen themselves. (Voices "That's right enough.") There was an im- pression that the seaman did not possess the status of a shore workman, but Mr Morgan would remind anyone of that opinion that the sailor was still a man, and entitled to the privileges and con- sideration of landsmen. (Applause.) An enthusiastic reception was accorded Mr Havelock Wilson, M.P., as he rose to address the meeting. At the outset he urged them to support the Union to a man. They had not done so during the past twelve years, otherwise many Acts of Parliament might have been placed on the Statute Book relating to seamen. However, they would not dwell on the past, but look to the future. What might they expect by unity? There were many things. In every port to-day the speaker discovered that the seafaring class had begun to realise that for them there was fresh hope, new life, and better and brighter prospects. (Cheers.) The bon. member bad read that the extension of the Workmen's Compensation Act to seamen would mean an annual expenditure of £ 600,000 to the shipowners. Was not that worth fighting for? Referring to the food scale, Mr Wilson said for 26 years he had been trying to show the shipowner that it was to his advantage to feed his men well. On American vessels the crews were given the best of everything," and in good quantity, but they had to work hard. The British shipowner, by supplying inferior food got bad work, and sometimes very little of it. The shipowners had agreed to the provision scale, but they kicked against tomatoes and bacon. (Laughter.) The speaker had offered to take 2-L lbs. of beef per week if clear of bone. The ship- 2 owners replied, ISfo, we will make it 3 lbs., and you must take it as it comes." But he (Mr Wilson) did nob want that, for he had seen beef weighing 12 lbs with only 5 lbs. of meat, the remainder being bone. And no man wants bone, except for sharpening his teeth," he continued. Further, he was not going to tolerate margarine for butter. (Laughter.) Ships' provisions should be carefully examined, and also the weights and scales used on board. With regard to accommodation on vessels, he was going to ask Parliament to increase it from 72 to 122 cubic feet, and endeavour to legislate so that a captain could not, to suit his own whim and fancy, give a man a condemnatory discharge because he might complain against bad treatment or-bad food. With regard to the question of aliens, he was going to ask Parliament to do what he considered reasonable and proper. He did not object to any man on the grounds of nationality, for he found good fellows in all parts of the world, but he did say that no man had a right to be engaged on a British ship unless he could speak and understand our language. (Cheers.) It was a danger to the lives and limbs of a crew for a man to be engaged who was not capable of understanding the orders. Every year 40,000 men were paid off from British ships on the Continent, and this was another thing which he was going to endeavour to stop. The cause of the seamen was not a party question, and he (Mr Wilson) was sure of good support. However, it was necessary that he should be in the House as much as possible just now to watch the ship- owners who were dodging thereabout. He urged the seamen to become Union men, and thus help to secure legislation to improve the conditions of the seagoing community. (Cheers.) At the close, a resolution was unanimously carried, pledging the meeting to support the Union and local branch, and do all in their power to assist Mr Wilson to secure much needed reforms in their conditions.

FOR WEAKNESS.

EX-POLICEMAN'S STORY ON OATH.

A. TAYLOR HARBARD.

SALE OF PROPERTY AT BARRY.

HOCKEY. ---.

NEXT SATURDAY'S FIXTURES.

BARRY WESLEY GUILD.

MISS E. P. HUGHES ON PRISON…

SOCIAL EVILS AND THEIR CURE

------------,..---.-----.----"--.--.--TWENTIETH…

BARRY EDUCATION COM-I MITTEE.

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