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BARRY DOCK ENGLISH BAPTIST…

"JOHN BULL AND HIS ODDITIES."|

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"JOHN BULL AND HIS ODDITIES." There was, unfortunately, not a large attend- ance on Monday evening at the lecture delivered by the Rev David Davies on The Whims and Oddities of John Bull." In the absence of Mr Gwyn Morris, the chair was occupied by the Rev T. Pandy John, the pastor of the church. Mr Davies, in the course of an excellent lecture, said the name John Bull was given to the British nation by the humorous Scotchman, John Arbothnot, in the time of George I., 107 years ago. Little did he realise at the time that the designa- tion would cling to the nation. In the various caricatures John Bull was shown in many attitudes, but he was oftener on his knees than the papers gave him credit for, and realised that there was One mightier than he. The British nation allowed itself to be caricatured as no other nation did. As represented by Punch, which owed its origin to a Welsh villager, John was the best- fed man in the world, therefore at Christmas time, in proportion to other countries, he consumed far more beef and poultry. England could colonise as no other country could, because the Government of the people was of a more righteous character than that of any other nation on God's earth. (Hear, hear). One of the failings of John Bull, however, was that his wine cellar was the largest in the world. Many doctors were to blame for this, because they recommended alcoholic liquors for medicinal purposes but now he (the lecturer) was glad to say that medical science was so far advanced that alcoholic beverages were no longer a necessity for any ailment. John Bull was like- wise a great lover of force, and was oftener more forcible than persuasive in his arguments, and here his Celtic origin made itself manifest, more particularly as regards the Welsh and Irish con- stituents of the nation, who were always fond of a row. In referring to the recent Peace Treaty between Briton and Boer, Mr Davies said the rejoicing were indeed Peace rejoicings, being very expressive and characteristic of the national senti- ment, and were the leaders of the enemy to visit this country they would be most cordially received by the whole of tlrS people, (Hear, hear). John Bull was not a lover of injustice, and behind his many failings was the rock of principle, the love of God and of man. (Cheers).—The lecture closed with the singing of a hymn, and the pronounce- ment of the benediction.

ENTERTAINMENT.

SHALL NOT FAIL.

VICAR FILLINGHAM AND HIS BISHOP.

BASEBALL.!

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