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1J--"--.---POETRY.' 111

s LARDER.

KEEP SPICES

TURPENTINE

FOR BEES' STINGS.

TO REMOVE VARNISH,

IN JAM-MAKING,

NETTLE BEER.

TO POLISH MARBLE.

DOMESTIC RECIPES.

[No title]

NORMA NORTON'S Y0Y7: OB. AN…

CHAPTER XLII.

CHAPTER XLIII,\^.^

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CHAPTER XLIII, é- A FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT, f Their sudden encounter with Robert Parke was as startling to Hawk and Handy as it was un- expected. expected. In the very flush of victory and triumph they had been overcome and disappointed I < The prize for which they had risked so much had been wrenched from their very grasp I The golden dream which they had so fondly cherished had suddenly faded; the reward which they fully expected to obtain for their villainy was irrevocably lost I Plunging along through the brush and under- growth, seeming to hear the sound of pursuing footsteps gaining upon them constantly, they sped on rapidly, dreading that they would be over- taken and captured every moment. They did not pause in their flight until they were so completely exhausted that they were compelled to halt for want or breath. Well, this is a disappointment, sure!" ex- claimed Hawk, as he squatted down, panting heavily, at the foot of a tree. I am completely immoralized. Who would have thought, arter all our good luck, in findin' the gal and capturin' her so easy, it would have turned out so misfortu- nate ? Cuss the luck responded Dirk, as he fluvg himself despondently on the ground. Who in the blazes was that old fellow we had the tussle with ? That was old Parke," Hawk replied and I'm mighty sorry we met him, for I know he 'cog nized me." He had* no business a-prowim' around thar that time o'night," said the other, angrily. I gave him a lick, however, that he won't forgit shortly," He pulled out a large knife as he spoke, and cituck it in the earth, savagely. Why, you didn't stab him, did you?" asked Hawk, quickly and uneasily. "Yes, I did," answered Dirk, testily. "I couldn't git him to loose his grip when I saw them other two chaps a-comia', and I had to do it to get rid of him." Look here, my friend," exclaimed Hawk, evi- dently greatly alarmed, we ain't got no time to stay in these diggins'. We must light out from here; thar is danger every minute we t arry. Them two young chaps will be certain to surmount us and take us in." "That's likely," responded Dirk; "but if we can get to the city we air safe. I think they'll be afraid to follow us thar, for fear of the gal's guar- dian." 41 Then we'd better be a-movinsaid the other, rising. Come on. We cam reach Lin den Station by morning and take the cars for the city, and git thar safe before anybody hears about this night's work." It was now near midnight, but the moon by this time had come out bright and clear, and flooded the woods with a golden glory, so they had no difficulty in finding their way as t hey trudged on toward the distant station. They made but few pauses, for they dreaded pursuit, and they believed that Van and CliS would follow them. At last the moon went down, and comparative darkness settled over them. 4; They became more and more depressod and nervous every moment. 4:; Every slight noise startled them. ¥ An owl hooted in the distance. They paused and listened. A wandering hare suddenly crossing their path made them shudder. They had a strange, unaccountable foreboding of impending calamity. Still they struggled on toward their destination, .9 in the dim light of the pallid stars. At last faint red streaks began to appear in the east—the heralds of approaching daylight. But still they brought little relief to the minds of these two conscience-stricken travellers. ff- As Dirk Handy's eyes rested upon them, he Tuey reminded him of streaks of blood! Suddenly, far away, they heard the shriek of a locomotive. Thar's the train now," said Hawk. We ain't fur from the station." Then they walked on more hopefully. The sun was just rising when they arrived in eight of the station. The morning train was there before them. Just as they hove in sight the cars started. By the Lord! cried Dirk, excitedly; yonder's che train now, and it's a-movin' off. Let's run, or we'll be left." They ran forward rapidly, but the train was nearly under full headway ere they reached it. We must jump on I" cried Dirk to Hawk, wildly. It won't do to be left, you know." Both men dashed recklessly toward the train and grabbed the iron railing on the platform of the car just passiag them in a frantic effort to get aboard. There was a loud cry of warning from the' brakesman, and then, in the next moment, the two men were thrown on the track, dragged down by the very vehicle upon which they had relied for salvation, and the cruel wheels-passed over them, crushing and mangling them. Retribution had overtaken them in a very un- expected and terrible manner. It was all so sudden, that the few men at the depot, for a minute, could scarcely realize the fearful accident. Then they drew the mutilated bodies from the track and gathered around them in horror and consternation. Hawk had been killed outright. Dirk was still alive, but terribly mangled. i; They laid Hawk's body out in the depot, and carried Dirk into the office, where they placed him on a lounge. Then one of the men went hurriedly for the nearest physician. When the physician arrived, which he did in a short time, as he did not live very far from the station, he pronounced Dirk to be in a very dangerous condition. "He can only live a short time," the physician said, solemnly. His hours are numbered. Do any of you know him ? he inquired of the by- standers. No; nobody knew him. He was evidently a tramp, and an entire stranger in that vicinity. The physician gave him a soothing potion, which he swallowed with difficulty, and then left him. (To be continued)

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