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Th« Man About Town.

I BRITISH WORKMEN'S AND GENERAL…

iTO-DAY'S WEATHEK, 4.30 P.M.

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I PAWNBROKER'S BANKRUPTCY…

I EXPLOSIVE HA,ift-WASH.

pI House of Commons.

-Betting Tragedy,

RHYMNEY IRON AND COAL COMPANY.

I THE LOGIC OF THE LAW.

I DEATH AT A DENTISTIS.

I OOLLIEIIY WARNING.

Babies v. Lawn Tennis.

I THE NEW TORTOISE.I

" WOMAN TO WOMAN." -

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FOREIGN NEWS. M

PENARTH WATER SUPPLY. I

KILLED BY LIQHINING. I

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The Murder of a Singer.j I

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The Murder of a Singer.j EXAMINATION OF THE ACCUSED. I VIENNA, Thursday Night.-The trial of the men accused of the murder of the girl Ann Szimon in Philippopolis proves so interesting that there is a tight every day over the 130 places in court. The Austrian Consul and his secretary attend each day, and so does the President of the Sobranje, a greitt number of officers, and, strange to say, the young wife of the accused Major Boitseheff. She comes in a striking dress, with roses in her hat, white gloves, and a smile for her husband and her friends. The major is Dressed in the Latest Fashion, I wears the ribbon of a foreign decoration, the medal for bravery, and yellow gloves. His moustache is waxed and turned upward, his attitude is self-conscious aud vain. The indictment was read aloud. Ho laughed at several. passages, but most when the scene was mentioned in which his brother when drunk paid his addresses to the murdered girl, and she defended herself against him with [3 log of wood. When the indictment stated that Boitseheff had looked out for a rich wife and had found her and married her, it was Madame Boitscbefl's turn to simper and laugh. Novelics, the ex-prefect, is the very reverse of Boitseheff. He is broken down and ashamed, and unable to answer the first questions address-ed to him otherwise than by nods. The gendarme Bogdan Waszilien looks |the stolid tool that he was. Boitschelfs oounsel Objected to One if the Jury, I highly-respscted bookseller ofi Philip popolin, but the Court, presided over by M. Lantschieff, decided that the bookseller was uct a man to be discarded. When Boitscheif left the court nfter the indictment had been read, a number of officers crowded round him in friendly walcotne. Boitseheff said aloud. "Even if you are not aUowed to speak to me to-day, to.morrow, or the day after, we shall soon all be together agaiu." Counsel for tbedafenco all objected to the admission of Dr. 'Genadieff to the Bar, who represents the murdered girl's baby daughter. It is to Dr. Genadivff that the chief merit is due of having brought the murder to light. The Court decided in favour of Dr. Genadieff. Bogdan was first examined. He admitted the truth of all he bad previously deposed, onJy he persists in saying that he did not know what was going to happen until Anna Jumped out of the Carriage. I Ex-Prefect of Police Novelics, on being examined, admitted everything, but denied having had a hand in the affair. He asserts that both before and after the murder Boitscheff told him that the Prince aud Princess wished that an end should be put to the scandal at any price. Novelics persists in saying that Anna lived when she was taken out of the carriage, and that Boitseheff throttled her in the road, but the Court assumes that Boitseheff and Novelics throttled her together when she first tried to escape by jumping out of the window. When the papers of Sofia first hinted at the murder Novelics wrote to Boitseheff asking him to get the Prince to hneh up the matter. Boitacl)efflot answer was an order to the ^prefect to write out a police certificate that Anna Szimon had left for Vienna. He did this with the help of the proprietress of the Cafe Chantant. Boitscheff's examination Thrille,d the Court. I He was gay and witty, bad seen nothing, heard nothing, had given no orders, had never worn a civilian's overcoat over a uniform, and on being shown the rings which Novelics had taken off the girl's fingers, said that one of them had been stolen from bim by Anna in the day3 when he was int,imate with her. He admitted to Novelics having asked him to hush up the nff-ur, but denies having said that the Prince and Princess wished an end to be put to the ncandal. On the night of the murder he had attended the Princess on a walk, and had then gone homo. He had never told a soul that the Prince had given orders that the girl should he murdered. If he had wished to murder Anna he could have done so without Novelics. He declared be had never written either to Anna or her father, and had never seen her father. He had paid Anna when- ever he had been near her, and had given her the means of living. On being shown the murdered girl's picture and asked if he recognised her, he said coldly, Ye?, to be sure He admitted having asked Novelics to lock the girl up I He supposed Novelics killed her beoause she tried to escape him when he was taking her across the frontier, Perhaps Novelics thought he was doing him a service. Novelics repeatedly made the sign of the cross while Boitseheff was making these depositions. -Daily News.

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TWO COFFINS FOR ONE CORPSE

CARDIFF SUBURBS AND THE ELECTRIC…

-COMMITTED FOR TRIAL,

Olla Podrida. -.

Barry Railway Company. I

BURGLAR IN EVENING DRESS.…