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--.--Execution at Maidstone,

A SOLDIER'S PLIGHT, I

j BOXING IN NEW YORK. I

BAD DEBTS AND KEEN COMPETITION.

THE COURT.I

IMR JOSEPH ARCH.I -

.rA Llandaff Mystery.

ADULTERA liON OF FOOD.

Perils of the Deep. ----a..--u--_.-

.....-Fog at Holyhead.

THE CITY OF AGRA,

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The Man About Town. I 1

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The Man About Town. I 1 One of the finest public improvements ever effected in Cardiff will be the opening of Cathays Park for a public place and making it the site for buildings of a public and national character—after the bargain has been scaled, settled, aud signed. Only the most untoward and unforeseen of circumstances will surely be allowed to dash the cup to the ground when it is once more so close to the lips. At the close of the Exhibition I ven- tured to hope that the magnificent grounds enclosed by those high stone walls would be secured to the town as one means of record- ing the Record Reign. The dream is near- ing fulfilment. The bargain on the side of the Marquis of Bute is hemmed in by requirements, but all of them are designed to secure the permanent maintenance of the beauties of the place. The avenues of trees already standing are to be preserved, and then trees must be planted to complete another avenue. The purchase of the Cathays Park by the Cor- poration will give unalloyed satisfaction to the great body of residents. The oppor- tunity is unique the occasion important and pressing. Cardiff waits to see a satis- factory settlement. In opposing the purchase of the Tramlines by the Cardiff Corporation under the terms at present submitted, I have had one object and one consideration constantly before me. That i8 how to secure the best possible terms for the ratepayers. There is, to begin with, no need for rushing the purchase. The terms offered at present are too high, and then behind them stands the fatal objection to hand over the working with all the increasing profit for the benefit of the Company for a period of fifteen years. I accuse no one of neglect, but it appears to me that if there had been the same eagerness in the Committee and the Council to secure information in favour of the Town that has been displayed by the supporters of the present terms, the scheme would never have had the slightest chance of being accepted. Councillor Evans let in. some much-needed light on the subject yesterday. The hearty manner in which the Council received the suggestion to construct new tram routes in Cardiff with a service of electric trams is a good omen for the success and early realisation of the scheme. The growth of the town and the widely separated districts make the provision of tramways ahsolutely necessary. There can be little doubt as to the lines paying expenses. By the time they could be com- pleted the traffic would be sufficient to pay a dividend. One hopes that the proposal will be taken up earnestly and carried through in a practical manner. Four thousand pounds weight of diseased meat is seized in Cardiff every year. How much is sold, spreading disease and death, principally among the poor and the working classes 1 The Health Com- mittee of Cardiff suggested to the Council the desirability of appointing a duly qualified veterinary surgeon, whose whole time should be devoted to examining meat intended for sale in the Borough. Divided counsels prevailed, and the recommendations of the Committee were sent back. The Medical Officer of Health is strangely anxious to avoid undue interference with the meat trade, and fears all sorts of things if such an Inspector is appointed. Better have clean and sound food for the people, whatever the consequences may be. There is no fear of proper and strict inspection raising the price or limiting the quantity. The honest trader will be benefitted by more thorough inspec- tion only the dishonest will be weeded oat or interfered with. The health of the com- munity is of far greater importance than a fer of "undue interference" noting pre- judicially upon an important trade. A lame and impotent objection. ♦ Let me direct your special attention to a letter which appears in the present issue from the Secretary of the Federation of Grocers' Associations, of which Councillor T. Cordey, Newport, is the president. The Secretary is under the impression that I have made a statement which is unfair to the grocers and provision dealers of. South Wales. I am pleased to have the opportunity of explaining what I had in ) mind when I wrote there is scarcely an article of prepared food placed on our tables which has not undergone some harmful II process of doctoring or dressing or adultera. tion." The art of compression is most difficult and must at times prove mislead- II ing, but the exigencies of space and the conditions under which subjects of current interest have to be treated, frequently I demand the most vigorous use of condensa- tion and compression. This is a case in point. When I wrote the sentence complained of I had in mind the current Battle of the j Sugars in the Law Courts, and I had also in mind a personal experience. Some sugars, it has just been proved, are a credit to the chemist, but wretched stuff as food. I have a sneaking regard for tea, delicately made, which I prefer to drink without milk, using a little sugar, so that the aroma of the tea is not destroyed. I experimented with four or five different kinds of sugar and dis- covered that they destroyed the flavour of the tea. Frequently a bluish sediment was left at the bottom of the cup, tasting very bitter and astringent and with a trace of blue colouring in it. I discarded beet sugar and rejoiced in the use of cane sugar, which did not leave the chemical sediment behind. But what do I now find ? That I cannot rely on getting sugar without the ohemical sediment in the cup, whatever I pay or however particular I am to demand cane sugar. The current cases of sugar adulteration and chemi- cal doctoring brought my experi- ence to mind vividly. The Breakfast Table is a mystery. Take Butter. If I ask for Butter do I get ib ? Can anyone say that there is no animal fat incorporated ? When attending a Wholesale Dealers' Con- ference in the North some years ago I learned a good deal about Butter." The public taste is largely to blame for preferring certain blends," but can you always rely on getting pure butter when you ask for it ? Can you buy pure lard by simply demand- ing "lard 1" I pay for a tin of Condensed Milk. Am I certain that it has not been skim me d before it was condensed ? I get deleterious alum in baking powder and bread. Mustard and pepper are mustard and pepper and much more. If I buy pickles can I rely on their being free from copperas and destructive acids, many times more powerful than malt vinear" Cocoas are often preparations with alkali present. Coffee is frequently a mixture of a small portion of the coffee bean, burnt bread crusts, and chicory. These instances will suffice to prove the general accuracy of my statement, which is not unjust to the grocers and dealers in South Wales. In most cases they do not adulterate, they simply sell the article as they receive it from the wholesale house or the manufacturer but will the Secretary of the Grocers' Federation ask me to believe that adulteration and mis- description of goods are unknown in South Wales ? The Select Committee on Adultera- tion undoubtedly reported as quoted in the Secretary's letter, but what of the Sugar Cases in the Courts within the prist few days ? I would rather trust my own recent experi- ences than rest contented with the fijidings of any Special Committee. Truly, we know not what we eat How many in South Wales, for instance—though this is outside ( the question at issue slightly-daily eat Irish and American bacon in the belief that it is prime Wiltshire, simply because the inferior article has been prepared to look like the better and more costly brand ? 4- 4. Lord Windsor has opened a County Fund for the relief of sufferers by the famine in India, and the Mayor of Cardiff has invited the residents of Cardiff to subscribe to the Borough Fund. The Churches have given already or have announced the day of their collections. But all that has been done is like » grain of sand in the ocean when we compare it with the vastness of the suffering which it is intended to relieve. The public of Cardiff and Glamorganshire have never realised what the Famine in India means, or the subscriptions would have presented a different total ere this. Though a blunder has been made, and we have seen much tardiness to move in many places, there is no excuse for further iner- tion. Madame Baudry, Richmond-road, suggests that Continental methods should be adopted in Cardiff by the Ladies of the Town to swell the Indian Famine Fund. On the Continent Ladies' Committees are formed to aid the Charities. The towns are divided into districts, and Ladies go from door to door with officially stamped collecting books and solicit a small subscrip- tion. Large sums are not asked for or expected. There is no big sum heading the list, and then there is no hesitation on the part of anybody I to give less than somebody else. Madame Baudry, who is willing to take hei full share in collecting, suggests that the Ladies of Cardiff should start a Threepenny house-to- house subscription. Have we not a Council of the Churches of Social Work that cuuld take up this work, or are the churches satis- fied that they have done all that the Master would expect of them were He here in our midst ? If twenty Ladies would make up their minds to do this work the door-to-door collection could be made in ten days' time and a substantial sum cabled to India to keep our fellow subjects from the horrors of starvation. Who will move ?

.1 GAVE HIM SOMETHING TO DO."I

CARDIFF SEAMEN'S B0ARDING-H0U8ES…

TO-DAY'S WtfATHEK, 4.30 P.M.

ITHE ESCAPE OF CONVICTS. I

A LONG SLEEP.I

HON FGEN HAYS. j

-.----. IA CARDIFF TURF AGENT'S…

BRIGG RAILWAY ACCIDENT. I…

MR McKINLEY'S CABINET,

--I Hess Divorce pase,j I-.._-"'-'..

BRUTALITY OF FOOTBALL

PA rENT MEDICINES.I

" COME QUIETLY." I

SHEFFIELD MAGISIIUCY.I

-Colchester Murder. .-"1\....-.

I IYOKOHAMA MAYBRICK CASE.…

PROTECTING THE POOR, I

I HE EXPRESS AND THE BULL,…

PANIC IN A THEATRE,

IDLE HOURS AND PITCH AND TOSS.…

TO PEOPLE WHO WAUT PROOF.…

I j The Strike at Cardiff…

LOCAL AMUSEMENTS. I

THE MASTER'S MISTAKE.

MR HEALY, M.P.

COLLISION AT SEA. -

A CARDIFF SHEBEEN

MISSING STATE OF GEORGIA,