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Local Appeal Case. I

TYLORSTOWN DISASTER.!

IA RECENT DISASTER AT SEA,I

[A BARRY SHEBEEN. j

I OFFICERS AT LOGGERHEADS.i

I Cardiff and the Prince.…

IThe Transvaal.

r SALVATION ARMY,

IACCIDENT TO A CYCLIST.I

¡[SPECIAL TELEGRAM.) 1

IBUSINESS DUNE TO-DAY.

I TO-DAY'S MARKETS. i

I ToO-VA V'S. CRICKET.I

is THE QUEEN A CATHOLIC ?…

[No title]

French Racing. I

I -SPORTING -ITEMS.I

Baron Hirsch's Will, I

SOUTH WALES SHOOTING I !RANGES.

HIGH CONSTABLE OF MERTHYR.…

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Death of Dr. Salmon. I

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Death of Dr. Salmon. I riiECOWBRIUGE CENTENARIAN I (SPROIAL TELEGRAM TO THE" ECHO."] I BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH. I An Interesting Career. I The death of Dr. Wm. Salmon of Penllyne tom, Cowbridge, at the venerable age of 106 years, removes a patriarchal figure from our midst. Be was oiio of the centenarians about whose age there can be absolutely no doubt, having been born at Wickham Market, Suffolk, on Tuesday, March 16th, 1790, and his mother's diary is still preserved, bearing the following interesting entry under that date Our dear little boy was born (how thankful am I to Heaven, which enabled me to go through the tryal with tolerable composure). Grant that I he may prove a comfort to us in manhood, as he is Well beloved by us in his infancy promising does ta. seem, may no ill blight rob us, his fond parents, Of the fruit we in expectation have bad. Above all, may virtue be his darling pursuit." Written in a clear, angular hand, with flourishes almost suggestive of the Elizabethan period, this record is still in existence and a photograph of the late doctor, with the page of the diary reproduced, was circulated among his friends and relations in 1892. In the year 1763 Dr. Salmon's father was a young medical practitioner at Wickham Market, lknd he becamn connected with South Wales through a lawsuit over a will dealing with the distribution of an estate of which he was the executor. After many years of legal proceedings the matter was still unsettled, and Dr. Salmon removed to Cottrell, near Cardiff, subsequently settlingdown at Cowbridge. The house he occupied is that nearly opposite the Bear Hotel and here the subject of our memoir grow up to manhood. In 1815, Mr Reynold Thomas Deere, who had "married one of the Misses Ricktirds, Lilantrisant Bouse. and settled down in Penllyne Court, rode trom Cowbridge to Swansea, and died when he reached the latter town. Dr. Salmon was deputed to break the news to Mr Deere's two daughters, Hester and Susan, the elder of whom ho shortly afterwards married, thus coming into possession of Penllyne Court. Mrs Salmon died in 1858, and the following tablet in Penllyne Church throws some light on the family history—" Sacred to the memory of Hester, the beloved wife of William Salmon, Esq.. sf Penllyne Court,, eldest daughter of the late Reynold Thomas Deere, Eq., who died April 14tb, 1858. agud 75 years, and is buried in Llan- .Irynach Church. (Also ot) Clara Deere Salmon. Cordelia Deere Salmon, and Wm. Reynold Salmon, all the beloved children of the above Hester and Wm. Salmon, of the family of Sir Thomas Salmon, Knight, regno Richard I., and fohn Salmon, Lord High Chancellor of England, cegno Edward IL" This mural inscription lays brief claim to con- siderable antiquity for the ancestors of the deceased gentleman, and a number of miniatures now in Penllyne Court, representing various members of his family, by the aristocratic and well-bred appearance of the fine ladies *nd rufied gentlemen depicted, folly bear out the as-umpbion. Miss Susan Deere, sister-in-law of Dr. Salmon, inherited the Garth estate at Llantwit Vardre, and remained un- married. Mr David Reynolds, himself Ponllyne monogenarian, said that the Deeres changed their name from that of Thomas for purposes of inheritance; but we are unable to verify this statement. Concerning Dr. Salmon's career, notwithstanding his Seiitury of active existence there is little to toll. Prior to his marriage he was appointed surgeon Jo a marching regiment, and lived with his corps for some short time in Swansea. But after his return to Oowbridge and his marriage with An heiress he ceased from practising his profession, though during later years his advice was often sought by and given to all classes of patients. He was not addicted to any particular form of sport, save a little mild shooting in the season but if he had it grand passion it was for travel. His earliest exploit in this direction was brought off in 1815, when the Allied Forces entered and occupied Paris. Dr. Salmon went with travelling carriage and pair to Dover, crossed the Channel,and drovo to Paris, where he had a right royal time with the British troops until they evacuated the city. Some years aftecwards he removed to the north of France for a considerable period, but as he has outlived all his contemporaries, and is only sur- vived by one daughter resident in London, and as further, the old gentleman was always particularly unwilling to have public reference made to bimself, it has been most difficult to obtain reliable data concerning his earlier life. lIe kept a record of his different journeys abroad in fairly complete style, and this should be a veritable treasure to his literary executors. We know that he was by far the oldest member of the medical profession in the world, and his portrait was recently hung in a place of honour in the Royal College of Surgeons. He was also the oldest Freemason, having joined the Jerusalem Lodge, London, very early in the century He joined the Swansea Lodge in 1851. The most curious feature about the attain- ment by Dr. Salmon of his great age lies in the fact that he never adopted any special ntle of life. nor did he take particular care of his health. In food and exercise be hved exactly as other men, and in his younger days he mixed in the fashionable set of the times. Of late years be was naturally somewhat taciturn, all his old friends being dead and gone; and since he attained his 102nd year he became very deaf and almost blind. Bnt he retained hi mental faculties in the most marvellous manner, and fully understood the purport of all that was said to him. In the summer he liked to be carried into the green-house, where he sould touch the fruit and flowers. Penllyne Court itself is a charming old spot, built in the Elizabethan style and period, and lying in a nook of the valley which holds the straggling and picturesque village Of Penllyne, The locality is a perfect nest of centenarians. Their records are either con- tained in the parish registers or they still flourish on the hillsides. But in the petson of Dr. Salmon the most notable figure has passed away. An actual link with the 18th century is gone, and the wonder is that one man's life should cover within its span all the marvellous events in literature, science, and art which have happened since Mrs Salmon, of Wickham Market, wrote her touching prayer in the diary for the happiness of her son.

SMALLPOX AT GLOUCESTER.

BOARD OF TRADE SURVEYOR-SHIP.

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I Matabele Rising. I

" Jarrahdale Jarrah."I -—-«-—

ICannibalism.I

. IMPROPRIETY. :I

I SIX WEEKS FOR ASSAULT. j

I -I ATTEMPTED SUICIDE.

I : Spain and America.

IYOUNG" WOMAN MURDERED.I

ARCHBISHOP IRELAND ON WAR.…

ISentences. I Reformers' Sentences.

I STREET BETTING AT NEWPORT.…

f LOCAL AMUSEMENTS.

I _Newmarket Training Notes.…

Official Scratchings. I

Sporting Prophecies, I

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