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Professor Rhys.__!

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Professor Rhys. The New Principal ef Jesus College. Sir John Williams, Bart., presided on Tuesday evening over a banquet, held at the Grand Hotel, London, to congratulate Professor John Rhys on his appointment as principal of Jesus College, Oxford. There was a large attendance of representative Welshmen. After dinner the toest of The Queen was duly honoured, and then Mi Vincent Evans, the honorary secretary, read letters from many friends of Professor Rhys, who were unable to be present. The writers included Lords Mostyn, j Kenyon, Powis, Etnlyn, and Reiidel, the Bishop j of Bangor, Priieipai Edwards, of Bangor Theo- logical College, SirGt-o. Osborne Morgan, Sir John Pulestou, Prof. McKiunon, Celtic Professor at Edinburgh, Hon. G. T. Kenyon, and Professor Palgrave. The Chairn.au proposed the toast of the evening, Our Guest.' He said they were met that evening not so mueu to do honour to Professor Rhys as to rejoice with him upon his success and to show the high value they placed upon him aDd upou bis work for Waies and Welsh ib?rmu? They had made his ?ieotion as Pnucip.? of Jesua College, Oxford, the occasion of their rejoicing, because that was a kind of mark or stamp placid upon his work. But it was Professor Rby;) they congratulated and not the Principal of Jesus. Professor Kliys's success was the resuit of a life of toil and struggle. He (the speaker) was not going to give them a history of Professor Rhys, but a portion of it which was of paramount value to him and to them was the same as that of every man who attained to great eminence, a life of toil, of energetic sirnprr!^ with difficulties, of extraordinary persevere. of indomitable will, of fearless hones.y, OL -t, -ig mind and well- balanced powers plao-d in a ic)ut,d and heaithy j frame, (Hear, hear.) These were the quali'ie^ which go to make a scholar, and enable hun to do good work and to command success. (Ap- plause.) What had Professor Rhys done ? He had devoted himself ia various ways to the service ot his country. He had served on various COIDUJissions in connection with Wales—the Sunday-olosing Commission, of which Lord Bal- four of Burieigh was president, and the Education Com wise ion, and now he was serving on the Welsh Land Coiauns- sion. He had earned European tame as a Celtic scholar by his work-, on Celtic mytho- logy, Celtic antiquities, and Celtic folk lore. (Applause.) Scholars sometimes became fossilised. Ttias was n t the case with Professor Rhys. The more learned iif, became the more interesting be became, and the inoreattaehed the peuple of Wales became to him. He now dwelt in the affections of tne people of Wales, and his uame was better known perhaps than that of any otner Welsiiti.an. (Hear, hear.) His popularity was due, no double in a great degree, to tiie warmth of his patriotism. He was a piilar of the Eisteddfod, and be (the chairman) was sure that that evening there were hundreds of hearts in W. es beating in uuison with those in that room, and congratulat- ing Professor Riiys. Lie hoptd that Jesus College, under Professor Rtiys'« leadership, would be the home of Welsh eoncatiou and ciliture in it way it had never been before. (Applause.) The Maiquis of BUTE said it g.¡VtJ him the greatest pi- <ure to support the toast. Years bad now passes since he had bad the happiness of regarding Professor Rhys with respect. They were just brought into contact with each other in literary work, and after that he was so for- tunate as to have Mrs Rhys and the Professor quartered in his house during the meeting of the British A-sociation at Cardiff Happy the house to entertain such guests. It was the greatest pleasure to him (the speaker) to hear of Professor Riiys's appointment to the Principalship of the Na tional College of Wales at Oxford, and most heartily did he congratulate tite professor aud the college. It was an appoint- ment which inspired great hopes for the tULure of philological scifuceand the cause vi Welsh learning and culture. (App;aue.)-Lord Balfour of Bur. leigh, who also supported the toast, saia his acquaintance with PIUt. Rhys began in an official i capacity, when lie was commissioned by the lata Government to go down into Wales upon a com- mission vvuich he thougnt of considerable impor- tauce. He found it would lIe of extreme advantage I to the Commission to hRve someone intimately acqua\lltd with Waies. Professor Ruys was su??ested, and he (Lord Balfour) was CùuvlDced I that nobody more s utable could have been found. The Ri?oi Hon. ARTHUR ACLAND, M.P., who followed, alluded to the difficulty of his position. He was not a Welshman, and I had not even been connected wi, ii ¡ I their friend on any of those Commissions But he was we'll acquainted with Professor I Rhys's history, and had often profited by his I work. Professor Rhys was a member of that I most iuiportant Departmental Committee which I wheeled the way towards Intermediate bduca- tion and Universities for Wales. At every stage those who were concerned in working out that problem were indebted to that com- mittee for their report. He was one of those engaged in working out that schem and one of his .Host interesting experiences was that when he came into office he found on the office table the I very scheme iit-, bad previously been instrumental in framing for Carnarvonshire. He Deed not tell then, he approved of that scheme. (Laughter.) As an Oxiord man he congratulated Professor Rhys oil tb Lt position he now held. (Applause.) The new Principal was already tenacious in the interest of bis oollege. He had I been trying to do a deal with him (Mr Aciaud) about the Meyrick Exhibition. There was an old story current at Oxford of Professor Riiys's early days there. It was said that when he came to the viva voce stage in his examination, the intercourse between him and the examiners was so close that one oould hardiy distinguish between the examined and the examiner. He (Mr Acland) could quite believe that it was so, for the days when Professor Rhys was a distiu- gu *bed scholar begau very long ago. One more honour was open to him. As the head of a I house, he must some day be Vice-Chancellor of the University. He (-the speaker) would venture to suggest that when that day arrived they should all meet again. (Applause.) In conclusion he tendered Professor Rhys the heartiest good wishes for his future. (Hear, hear.) I Professor RHYS, who was loudly applauded on I rising to reply, said he must confess to being utterly overwhelme d by the kindly words which had been uttered in reference to himself, and by the whole attitude of that numerous gathering, so I' he gave it up as a hopeless task to find words which would adequately express his feelings of pleasure and gratification. He could not look in any direction without beholding a face which recalled some pleasant memory or other. In one part of the room be saw a companion of his boy- hood, whose presence reminded him of the scenes of his earlier days. In another he descried i friends of his undergraduate days, and not far off one or two of the dons, who tried to oheck his thoughtlessness and lead nim in the way recom- mended by an indulgent Alma. Mater. He could not help seeing here also several of the able men with whom it had been his privilege to work on Commissions having as their object the welfare of Wales in one respect or another. The first of those commissions was the Departmental Com- mittee of 1880. to inquire into the state of luter- meoiatl." and Higher Education in Wales, and be believed that no Commission had ever had more remarkable results, viewed from the educational standpoint. It might. be said to have changed the entire landscape. But among other things which made that Commission pleasant to re- member was the fact that it first gave him the opportunity of knowing ir-s noble chairman. Had I Lord Aberdare been all ve he (the speaker) thought he would have been there that night but their I loss was not worth mentioning as compared with that which the whole Welsh people were now deploring. There was, however, one consoling thought, namely, that even as it was, he lived to see most of the work completed on which he had set his heart. H.. (Professor Rhys) was delighted to see around him so many pol ticians of both parties, including a goodly number of members of Parltamfnt, past, present and potential. It was particularly gratifying to | see present members there, becnuse it was a guarantee of peace in another place as well as a proof of their combined interest in everythmg connected, however feebly, with Welsh educa- tion. He would only repeat what he said at the beginning, namely, that he thanked them ail, especially Sir John W)Hiams and Mr Vince,??? Evans, with all his heart for that magnificent t display of friendliness and good fellov.hip. Loud applause.) I Other toasts followed.

PONTYPRIDD SCHOOL BOARD.I

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