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i Here and There.

The Cardiff Muddle.

--THE RECENT SPORTS ATI CARMARTHEN,

-_-THE CHURCH IN WALES.

LARGE ORDERS FOR WELSH TIN-PLATES.

---.-I NEATH BUILDING STRIKE,

FIFTY SHORT STORIES BY WELL-KNOWN…

I--_.__ Miners' Eight Hours…

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Miners' Eight Hours Day. REPLY TO MR DAVID MORGAN. TO THK FDITOR. &IR,—1 see in your paper a rather lengthy epistle from our friend, Mr David Moigan, pouring (jut his anathema upon all those who happen not, to be of the same opinion as himself on the above question. I would not trouble you with a reply had it not been that Mr Morgan has thought fit to mention my name in connection with a certain conference held in Cardiff three ye.ftrs ag(" wl)f-n this question was brought forward, he (Mr Morgan) having proposed a ballot on that occasion. True, Mr Morgan did propose a, ballot and spoke against the eight hours for fear of the double shift, and then stated that he wanted a measure stating the actual hours of wosk at the face, and stated that the time should not be counted from bank to bank only as actually worked. Now, sir, Mr Morgan says that I opposed the taking of a ballot on that occasion. That I totally deny j but what I did when Mr Morgan proposed hi* oriinna! motion re the hours of working at the filc, was to mow, as an amendment, the adoption of the Bill as it then stood. I then gave my reasons, as I have on several occasions since. One of them was that, as a matter of fact, any artisan who walks in through the gatc) when the bell rings at any yard or workshop is considered to be at his work. Why should not a collier who descends the pit ? And, as I stated then, they are very often laden with a toad of u)aiidril,-3-perl)api two, three, or four, and sometimes more than that, particularly in the house-coal seams, and have to walk a distance of half a inile or even a mile, or, as I have seen myself and hundreds more of the old house-coal workmen, having to walk even two miles under circumstances similar to those above mentioned, until we should b" by the time Y,-a reached the face of our working almost dropping and in a bath of perspiration. Therefore, 1 contend that walking to and from the working fan to the pit-bottom under those conditions ii not easy work, and surely worthy of some con- sideration. Therefore, I was not opposing the ballot on that occasion. I have often suggested tffat the bal.'ot should have been taken. Further, I may assure you that we have taken a bailot hero some time sme, with the result that the majority went for the Bill from bank to bank, titli kikh srjme collieries voted to a man against, the ts: Air Morgan says tnat he was scoffed at on that occasion, viz.. the conffrence of May, 1891, held at the Cyiomro- dorion-hall, Cardiff. Now. sir, I again deny that (-ver tt 'Ale or any other individual, however much I may be opposed to him ou any question. Then, as to taking the ballot, I say again, as I said in my previous letter, which appeared in your paper of the 7rh inst., that it would be folly at this time of day to do anything of the kind, and i would be showing great weakness on our part whatever the result might be. I say again, if a ballot were to be taken that she ballot should be a general ballot for the whole of Great Biitain, and not for a section, as we are in South Wales. And even then I say that it is now after date, as if a ballot were to be taken at all it should b before this Bin was into Parlia- ment. Further, I wish to point- out that it is on'y very recently tb,t Mr 11oran hr,s made np Ins mind as to what it is that he really sug- gests, even if he is altogether clear now, for some time ago ho was found advocating so many hours of actual work then he advocated from some particular pass. Now he advocates the return to the pit-bottom by his letter to-day. Hitherto Mr Morgan has been merely an opponent to the Bill fo-- fe:ir or the big itogcv double shift," or a large reduction of wages, viz., 20 or 25 per cent., merely because of the extra cost. 0f production. It is very gall- iug- indeed to think that any labour representa- tive should always be harping upon the string of expenditure ? Is it not a filet that the same arguments worc raised by employers and officials before the Act of 1872 came into operation, when the winding hours were from ten to eleven hours per clay.Ailt, was said then bi -it the trade was goine ro be driven from the country, and that the hlood of tho innocents would be upon the heads of the promoters of that alteration. And it is I the same to-day, and I --aiapose always will ti,- hat those that sper k first for any improvement I have to speak twice, and have to bear the taunts of their opponents as though they were the greatest hypocrites and destrmtioo'sfes that; ever lived. Again, I would say that tho of tite E'ght Hours' Bill are so numerous, and they differ so much in tfe;r reasons for opposing, that although the question has been before Siuth Wales for the last seven yea-s, yet they have not yet drafted any finite men'-aire to propose instead of it. In conclusion, I say again that to me it is a day after date to take a ba'lot.—I am, &e Bkewen, May 22nd, 1894. WAAO EVAJvS. TO THE EDITOR. Sir.,—Please permit mo briefly to reply to Mr I David Morgan, who accord mo of coupling his r.arne with that of Mr W. Thoti-ap, Brynawei. j pxpectinsr the workmen to accept their word as law. My friend has no need to blame tha reporter, because nothing of the kind was ever reported. The composer and publisher of the words is none other than D. Morgan. With regard to Mr Morgan's informant, I must say that he is undoubtedly a pet of his, who he—Mr Morgan—undoubtedly find3 vt-ry useful for tale- bearing purposes, Ishonld like very much for my old and Jovng fripnd to bear this in mind—that I do not think it worth going to a court of Jaw to find out who his informant is, because I know \-jiy well that the informant aud Mr D. Morgan are one, and the same person this is ro new work for fi I iii. He started it during the last strike, I when he d<»«crib d tho hauliers as an idle, reck- less, drunken lot. I expected at one time to hear and see something' better than this kind of | child's piny from a man who boasts of his 23 "¡¡r. of service. All I have to say is, if the; next > 28 years w.U prove as fruitful as the last they will undoubtedly cai:e many a monument to be erected m loving memory to many a leader by our workhouse doors. Let him briug his informaii' hfpest'v into the pages of tha South Wiles Dailp Neics, and let the mining community of feouf.h Wales and Monmouthshire <-ee that he is m no way playing any game apart from the truth. Until the same be done I am hound n adhere to mv f rmec opinion* of him.— I a-ri, Tze., T.eorky, May 22nd. MORGAN THOMAS. MORGA 1'HOMA I

NEATH CORPORATION AND THE…

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