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Anarchists in London.

THREE MONTHS FOR FRAUD".

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RECORDER AND JURY.

r A Man in the House. I

I EARTHQUAKES IN GREECE. I

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Breach of Promise Case.

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Breach of Promise Case. ACTION AGAINST A NEATH SOLICITOR. Courtship on Board Ship. DAMAGES JE300 AND COSTS. [SPECIAL TKLKORAM TO THE "KCHO."] To-day, at the Sheriff's Court, Red Lion- square, London, before Mr Under-Sheriff Bur- chell and a jury, the case of Mitchell v. Price, an action for breach of promise of marriage which had been remitted from the High Court for the assessment of damaree, came on for hearing. The plaintiff, Miss Grace Rani Mitchell, is a young lady 19 years of age, living with her aunt, Mrs Jnne Illingworth, who sues as her next friend, at Ritterbods, Canterbury-grove, West Norwood and the defendant, Mr James Benjamin Garsed Price, is described aa a solicitor, residing at Neath, in the county of Glamorganshire. Mr Marshall Hall and Mr Moore (instructed by Mr J. F. Rowe) appeared for the plaintiff. Case for the Piaintiff. Counsel in explaining the case said that the parties were only in each other's society a matter of four days on board the P. and O. steamer Carthage, and he believed that this was the ground on which the defendant suggested that only small compensation should be paid to the plaintiff. Miss Mitchell was the daughter of Mr James Mitchell, formerly of West Norwood. Her mother's sister was the wife cf the Rajah Rampal Sing of Oude, India. Both her parents were dead, sha being their only child. Tha Rajah was her god father and had acted in some manner, and especially while she was m India M her guardian since she was very young. In the months of June, 1892, the plaintiff went by the P. and O. steamelil Carthage on a visit to India, and she joined the vessel at the London docks. She first met the defendant on board this vessel. They were both first-class passengers. Miss Mitchell sat at the purser's table to meals, and the defendant sat at the doctor's table. Shortly after the commencement of the voyage the defendant spoke to the plaintiff on the deck. The plaintiff,although travelling alone, had been placed in the stewardess's care. The parties became very well acquainted with each other and conversed fre- quently and freely. On one occasion the plaintiff told him that when she WM in Germany Mr Mahler, her stepfather, after her mother's death had wished to marry her, and she was much upset by this suggestion. A day or two before the vessel got to Malta the defendant proposed marriage to her, and she told him that she must have her guardian's consent first, and afterwards told him who her guardian was. Previous to the proposal she had told the defendtnt she was going out to see her aunt in India. The defen- dant left the vessel at Suez and promised to write at once. Agreit deal of correspondence passed between them during the time Miss Mit- chell was in India, but when she returned to England on the 11th of January, 1393, the letters from the defendant ceased, although the plaintiff wrote to him several times. She then wrote to Mr Howell J. J. Price, an uncle of tho defend- ant's, and afterwards received the following tele- gram Poor nephew died very suddenly at Bristol, 15th Dec., of blood poisoning.—Price." During tho voyage, Mr Marshall Hall continued, the parties, with the doctor and the captain of the vessel, had a trip on Malta, where the de- fendant appeared anxious to purchase half the ewel shops in the place. It was at Suez that the premise to marry was conditionally accepted. Mr Price returned home over land, and stopped -it Shepherd's Hotel, one of tiie gayest hotels in the country. He wrote from that place stating that ho had mes with all accident, and con- tinuing- In the first place, my darling Grace, I would not have made you the offer had I not been in a position to treat you as you deserve. He went on to say that from landed estates he had an income of £ 1,000, besides what he earned in his profession. Tho letter was couched in terms of endearment, and concluded— All I want is you, and nothing more, and I promise you the happiest, homo that ever girl had. Many men inart-y without the mea.ns, but I have the cage, but no bird inside. (L:1.ught,e¡'.) I have a song of yours, It was a dream," set to my rmisio. So far as he (counsel) knew, the cage was stiil empty, although the bird was in court. In another letter the defendant gave a humorous description of the passengers he met with on h e n-iel? with on his voyage home. He said that the captain was a muff" and very strict, as he would not allow any afternoon ta. fights." (Laughter.) In another epistle he launched into poetry, anct said he was head over ears in electioneering work on behalf of the Conservative party, and also referted o his dogs, which he had said that he would not know how to do ivittiotit. Fancy me," the letter continue, in a snug little room, half-a-dozen dogs about ma—some on the carpet and some on the couch." (Laughter.) In another letter the defendant said he addressed tho piaintiff "My darling little Grace," and said that she did not know how much he had suffered from not seeing her. In a further he said, I'm in domestic troubie again. I've had to discharge Hiy housekeer, who in iuy absence I find had been driving about in my carriages. I always thought that she was a tile off, but never thought she would act the goat. (Loud laughter.) Well, I said, "Here's enough of housekeeping. I'm off to Bombay, for you know who." (Laughter.) There then followed a letter from India, in which plaintiff accepted the plaintiff, and he wrote, My own Grace, you don't know how happy you have made me. I dare not open the letter for a long time. If [1 had not received the joyful news you might have had ■> bladyjdged card. (Roars of laughter.) Mr Price then proceeded to deal with his pri- vate affairs, stating that he had a spanking tandem team, and finished with the following verse Though now in another country, And many miles apart, I cannot see my darling, But no other hM my heart. (Loud laughter.) Counsel proceeded to read a large number of other letters all couched in affac- tionate terms. In one of these he said "All I can promise you, dearest Gracie, is a comfortable home and a loving husband." In his last letter but one he said, "I am going to a spinstar's dance to-night." (Laughter.) Possibly (Mr Marshall Hall suggested) that this was the cause of the breaking off of the engagement. (Laughter.) There he might have met another lady, but at ary rate he only wrote one letter afterwards. The last letter was a very short epistle, but its terms were affectionate. He stated that he had sent her a scent bottle and monogram card case. Then followed the telegram announcing the death of the defendant, A more scandalous, disgraceful pieceofchiclluory he (coun eel), bid never heard of. The man had not tho courag to do the breaking off in a inaniy fashion There was 1101 the courage of wood-louse displayed, and Miss Mitchell wrote a very touching letter to the uncle, in whioh she thanked him for sending the sad news and eoncluding 61 My poor Jim, my heart is broken. I oannot write more." Some time after that the yonng hdy happened to be at Somerset House on businesf, and thought that she would like to see the death certificate of her lover, but when it was produced it was found to be the certificate of death of a relative. Then the whole deception was brought to the light of day, and Miss Mitchell pealng that sbe had beeen duped, placed tb matter in the hands of her solicitor. "That gentleman wrote pointing out that his client bad been the victim of crnel and heartless deception" the present action was commenced. In conclusion Mr Marshall Hall said that he did not ask for vindictive The Verdict. The jury found for the plaintiff, and assessed damages at 2300 and costs.

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