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- BARRY RAILWAY BILL IN PARLIAMENT.

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BARRY RAILWAY BILL IN PARLIAMENT. Mil A. J. WILLIAMS' MOTION FOR ITS RE-COMMITMENT. THE MOTION RULED OUT OF ORDER. THE HON. GENTLEMAN SATISFIED WITH AN OFFICIAL STATEMENT. -BOARD OF TRADE WILL EXERCISE MORAL SUASION. In reference to the Barry Railway Bill, Mr Arthur J. Williams (G., South Glamorgan) had given notice in the House of Commons of the following motion, which he brought forward on Friday evening last, viz.:—That the Barry Railway Bill (Lords) be re-committed to the former com- mittee, and that the committee have leave to sit and proceed forthwith that it be an instruction to the committee to hear the case of the Glamor- gan County Council, petitioners against the Bill, ,-and that the committee have power to insert a clause providing that the railways of the company shall be adapted and opened for the conveyance of passenger traffic within such reasonable period as the committee shall think fit. Mr Williams said he was glad to find it would not be necessary for him to detain the House for more than a few moments with reference to the motion of which he had given notice. He had had the great advantage of being able to obtain the Speaker's view in the first instance as to whether the motion was in order. He understood that the Speaker was disposed to agree with the view expressed by Lord Balfour of Burleigh, the chairman of the com- mittee of the House of Lords, before whom a similar Bill had been this Session, that the powers which he ventured to ask the House to instruct the committee to obtain were not in order. The Local Government Act of 1888 imposed the duty upon county councils of each county to watch and safeguard the public interests with reference to Bills applied for by railways. The County Council of Glamorgan had acted up to their duty where railway companies had sought to obtain special "Dowers for the malting of railways. The matter Si question was the provision of proper passenger accommodation. It might be said, why had they not gone to the Railway Commissioners for an order that passengers should have proper accom- modation ? „ Mr Powell Williams rose to a point of order. What was the question before the house I The Speaker It is this. The hon. and learned gentleman has appealed to me, and I have been obliged to tell him that under the peculiar circum- stances of the case he cannot move the instruc- tion, and the hon. and learned gentleman is now proposing to withdraw it. But, inasmuch as there is some large question of policy involved he is appealing to the Board of Trade with regard to the general system of the railway which is now concerned. It is not in order to make a condition precedent before a par- ticular line, a mineral line, as in this case sanc- tioned by this House, that over the other railways of the system of the company passenger accomo- dation shall be granted for passenger traffic. It will be contrary to the practice of this House to impose as a condition of the granting of a particu- lar line a condition applying to the whole system, which should be more the subject of general ^Mr^owell Williams I understand the hon.and learned member is not in a position to proceed with his motion. .3 The speaker That is so. and that is the under- standing on which the hon. and learned gentle- man's is now addressing the House. Mr A. Williams said that there was some mis- apprehension with reference to the Bill before the Souse of Commons Committee. It was a Bill for a small extension of the mam line of the the Barry Railway. In 1884, the Barry Railway Company obtained an Act of Parliament, authonsmg^the construction of a large dock, and a pa goods railway from the dock to a. coal about 12 miles distant. From 1H84 onward, the company had carried on this main line. From the coalfields they had carried large quantities of coal and earned large dividends, but they had not carried any passengers. Now they came to Parlia- ment and asked for a small extension of their mam line, upon which they avowedly take carry passengers as well an minerals.^ The morgan County Council came to Parliament and said Before you give this special power to the Barry Company we think they should give some undertaking. We represent the public interest in this request-that they will begin within a reason- able time to afford a passenger accommodation on this main line"; for that was the question. There seemed to be some question as to how far it Was in the competence of the committee—he did not for one moment dispute the correctness of the ruling of the chairman of the committee-to deal with the matter. At the same time it was one of grave importance to Glamorganshire that these passenger lines, avowedly lines obtained under powers and undertakings that they would open passenger traffic. They were not giving pas- senger traffic, and the county council could not get an order from the Railway Commissioners. The advantage to the county council would be so great that he did hope, and his constituents were anxious that the line should be made, and would do nothing to throw out the Bill, that he might urge ugon the Board of Trade and the railway company that they would give some honourable pledge that, as soon as possible, they would give them this accommodation they asked for. With reference to the larger question, he did hope that the Board of Trade would bear in mind the public interest involved, and would assist the local authorities throughout the kingdom in insist- ing that the obligations of the railway companies should be observed. (Hear, hear.) The Speaker said there was no question before the House. The hon. and learned gentleman not moving his restriction, the hon. gentleman had said enough to inform the Board of Trade of the nature of the policy involved, and the discussion could not be pursued. Mr Bryce asked if it would be in order for him to make any observations in reply to what the hon. gentleman had said. The Speaker said he should not have permitted the hon. gentleman to go so far as he did unless he had thought his observations had the sanction of the Board of Trade. The right hon gentleman might offer a few remarks to a contrary effect. Mr Bryce said his observations would be in the nature of a response to the appeal which the hon. gentleman had made to the Board of Trade. He was very glad that under the rules this question could not be brought on because it would have been his duty, whatever he might have felt with regard to the merits of the case, to remind the House of the danger there was in interfering with the rules of procedure by which committees are governed, except in cases in which questions were raised that could not be properly raised before the committee, or where a large public policy was involved. (Hear, hear.) With regard to the appeal which his hon. friend had made to him, he would say just this. He believed that the part of Glamorgan to which he referred did considerably suffer from the want of passenger traffic on this line. The attention of the Board of Trade had been called to the matter, and he could assure him that, recognising the need that existed for passenger traffic along the line, they would consider it their duty to take every proper means for pressing the railway company to open the line for passenger traffic.—What the Glamorgan County Council had requested was that they should obtain, whether with or without Parlia- mentary powers, connection with the Taff Vale System and the necessary station accommodation on the line. He hoped that would be a sufficient answer to his hon. friend. (Hear, hear.) Sir Theodore Fry, the chairman of the com- mittee who considered the Bill, desired to make ,a personal explanation with reference to what the hon. and learned gentleman and said to the decision of the committee. The committee never had the slightest difficulty whatever in coming to a decision on the points involved in the Bill. The same decision had been given by the Board of Trade, the Railway Commissioners, by a committee of the House of Lords, and a part from what he might do personally, he would repeat that never for one moment had the committee any difficulty in the matter.

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