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ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF…

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ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE I WELSH ASSOCIATION. I The annual general meeting of the Welsh Associa- tion was held at the Wynnstay Arms Hotel, Wrex- ham, on Wednesday night. Mr T. E. Thomas pre. sided, and there were also present—Messre. H. Hunter, Oswestry; G. H. Jones, Shrewsbury C. W. Berrie, Rhyl; D. Smith, Westminster Rovers; Cotton, Rhostyllen; J. K. Wilcox, Ruabon; J. Morrison. Ruabon, members of the Welsh Com- mittee; E. Phennah, Wrexham Gosson, Shrews. bury; P. Griffiths, Chirk; Grindlev, Flint; Wil- liams, Broughton St. Pauls; E. Cotterill, Rhos Thompson, Rhostyllen; J. Wilding, Westminster Rovers; J. Stanford, Wrexham Victoria; Cafferty, Wrexham Hibernians; Dodd, Brymbo Institute, and J. Taylor, secretary. The Chairman said that Mr Hunter and Mr Taylor had been appointed to represent the Association at the meeting of the International Board to be held in Glasgow in June. The following recommendation to the Board from the English Association was considered :That it is desirable that the positions of umpires should be abolished. That lines-men should be appointed whose duties (subject to the referee) should be to decide when the ball is out of play. and which side has the throw in. Mr G. H. Jones proposed that the Association approve of the change. Mr Phennah seconded. He thought the change would save a lot of time and trouble. Mr Hunter said some time ago the chairman pro. posed a resolution, which was identical with the present one. Mr Williams and Mr Grindley were in favor of letting matters remain as they were. Mr Stanford suppoit^d the resolution and Mr Morrison said he thought the recommendation should go further, and give the referee power to give free kicks for foul play without an appeal. The resolution was carried, three voting against it. The following recommendation by the Board itself was next considered :—The Board is of opinion that legislation is desirable on the following lines If any player shall intentionally ttip or hold an opposing player, or deliberately handle the ball within twelve yards from his own goal-line, the referree shall, on appeal, award the opposing side a penalty kick, to be takett from any point twelve yards from the goal-line under the following conditions-All playeis, with the exception of the player taking the penalty kick, and the opposing goalkeeper, shall stand behind the ball, and at least six yards from it; the ball shall be in play when the kick is taken. A goal nny be scored from the penalty kick.' The Council of the Football Association also propose the above." The Seen tiry The recommendation arose out of a proposal by he Irish Association with reference to some matter. The proposition was not approved of and consequently fell through. Some years ago the English Association had a rule to the effect that if a player knocked the ball out when, in the opinion of the referee, it was going between the posts, he was to allow a goal. This however, was found out t o work well. He proposed that the recommendation be ape proved of. Mr Berrie seconded, and it was agreed to, two vot- ing against it. There was a long discussion on the motion by the Chairman, to alter rule 16 of the cup ccmpetition rules, so as; o allow a protest being lodged with the referee only, and not with the captain of the opposing team and referee, as at present. On being put to the vote, seven voted for the altera- tion and seven against. The Chairman gave his casting vote in favor of the alteration. It was decided that the committee instruct referees to give immediate notice of any protest lodged with him t ) the team protested against. On the m< tion of the Secretary, seconded by Mr Hunter, it was decided to make such alteration in the cup competition rules as to provide for the last eight clubs left in the competition being thrown in the hat together. The S:cretiry said his intention in proposing the resolution was to lead to one to the effect that the four semi-finals be excused playing in the preliminary rounds, and that the winners in the four divisions should fien be put in the hat with the seiiii-fitialist, The Secretary then moved that itiled be adopted to provide for the registration of players as pro- fessionals. He said if the resolution was carried, that a sul,-cjinrn:lttee would have to be appointed to drc.w up uiles for the registration of professionals, and for the keeping of them under the control I.f the Associa- tion. The only objection at present t) professional players taking part in the Welsh Cup Competition, was rule 20 of the Association lules, which would, of course be struck out if this resolution was carried. lie was confident if the Welsh Association adcpted professionalism, that it would make their club better, and they would become more popular. It would tend to keep their players at home, for they could n, t adopt fctringent rules to prevent importation. If the resolution was carried, it did not mean that all the clubs were to go in for wholesale professionalism. It was simply a protection against English clubs coming down and hiring away their best players. The abilities of the new players in a t -am were not found out until part of the season was over, and then just when the team was getting into shape, some of the players were taken away. Of course, signing ii. professional form might only be an arrangement with the club to pay him for the time lost by him. Mr D. Smith seconded. The Chairman said there seemed to be a growing feeling of dissatisfaction amongst Welsh cluba with reference to their players being enticed away. He thought if they could get players registered at the beginning that they could then depend upon them for the remainder of the season. The only thing was whether, when the rules were adopted and the players registered with the Welsh Association, that would prevent English clubs taking the players registered. Mr Hunter said most certainly. The Secretary said cluhs that entered the English Cup would have to register professionals with the English Association. Mr Phennat said thjre was no doubt Welsh clubs were crippled when they had their t-ams well together. There were many young prayers put into the team at the beginning of the season, who before the season was half over were taken away by English club?. If the English clubs had taken them at the beginning of the season, they would have been quite welcome to them, but I no, they were taken just when they were most wanted. He did not say that any Welsh club would be able to pay their men a regular wage, but he thought some of them would go to some trouble in getting money to see the playerki.- dida!not lose any- thing by having to lose half-a-day'a work. Clubs would then be able to send away bettsr teams. The only objection he had to it was that they would not often have the cup in Wales. Mr G. H. Jcnea and Mr Stanford spoke against the motion. {r Berrie supported the proposition. He thought if Wales adopted professionalism, that Ireland and Scotland would also adopt it. He knew that there were players in Wales, who were at present paid for loss of time. On being put to the vote, nine voted for the amend- ment, and nine against. The Chairman said he felt disinclined to give his casting vot3 either way, and finally Mr Cotton proposed that the meeting adjourn for a fortnight. Mr Phennah seconded, and it was agreed to.

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