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BOUNTY MAGISTRATES' COURT.…

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Westminster Hall did not even on the foremost days of the great trial present a more crowded and excited appearance than on Monday, when Messrs. Wballey and Onslow were called upon by that terrible functionary, the Chief Justice of England, to answer the charge of contempt of court. The scene had its Icdicrous aspects, but the grand way in which the Chief Irquisitor brought the de- linquents on their knees adds another to the strik- ing proofs that no judge that ever sat in West- minster Hall knew better than Cockburn how to maintain the dignity of his court. He certainly did not spare his victims, but probably not among the least of his triumphs will be counted this, of paving, for once, even awed the irrepressible Mr Wballey! a I Sff- "r.'I .31_ The common law judges to wnom mr JQJUWIM James has appealed from the decision of the Benchers of the Inner Temple disbarring him have decided to meet on the 20th of next month to hear the reasons which the Benchers may have for maintaining their order. The public will watch the result with interest, for Mr James is undoubt- edly a n1811 of splendid ability, and the loss of his position at the Bar is a loss to the country. He has been exiled from England and the English Bar since 1861. For years previously he had been one of the leaders of the Bar, earning eight or nine thousand a-year. He was not a brilliant orator, but he was a clever and most persuasive speaker, which is far better in a law court. Mr Edwin James showed great skill in the conduct of a case his speeches were shrewd, compact, and forcible and they always told on a jury while his powers of cross-examination were universally admired, except by the tmhappy victims of them. On the reasons which induced the Benchers of the luner Temple to disbar him, I wilt say nothing, but I shall be glad to hear that they think he has now been sufficiently punished, or that the Radges over- rule the decision. Ought not something to be done By way of legislation to punish the coneoctors of false and scandalous charges. A captain, late of the 2nd Life Gcards, has been cirarged by « servant girl with iedecently assaulting her. Several credible witnesses, who knew the girl's character, declared they would not believS her on her oath, and the defendant was discharged, Mr Arneld, an experi- enced magistrate, remarking that the gentleman had been brought there upon A most wicked and scandalously false charge." This girl, moreover, tried to blast the moral character of another gen- tleman, who is a ledger in the same house. The defendant was discharged, with the rematfk cited, and there the case ends but tit ought not to end there. Tuis prosecution, be it remarked, was con-' ducted by the Society for the Protection of Women aud Children. If such cates as this coatinue to be trumped up, we shall want a Society for the Protection of Men. Two greatty distinguished men 6f letters have passed away since last I wrote to you. James Hannay, the bright, fierce pen that animated the earlier pages of the Pali Mall Gazette, is gone, at the early age of forty-six. He was a very capable, but only a partially successful journalist. In fact, he was too literary for journalism, and his fame will have to rest on his novels and some of his essays. He made friends, few but firm, and ene- mies, many and unforgiving but those who knew the man best speak gloriously of his sterling social qualities. More need not be said. Lord Lytton's biography may not be written in half-a- dozen lines, nor the place he has long and proudly held in literature be defined in two or three sen- tences. He has gone from amongst us in the fulness of years and fame, and, like Dickens, has left one task incomplete. It was only the other day that Mr Fildes was asked and declined to illustrate Lord Lytton's last noveF (Mr Fildes illustrated "Edwin Dreod) I am teld that that nOrel had yet to receive the final touches of the master's hand. I have read a great deal of the eorrespondeoee relative to Lord Byron's notorious engrammatical error, there let him lay" instead of lie." The Byron party prove themselves to be very clever, but thay cannot, with all their skill, prove their idol to have been right. Whether 11 lay" was an oversight or intentional on the part of the post (the rhyme shows that it was not a printer's error) the word is decidedly wrong, and all the argument in the world will not make it right. To use lay*' for lie" is a common blender in ordi- nary conversation; it is the only one that some people make but if ninety-nine out of every hun- dred persons made this blunder, it would be a blunder still. There you have the trath in a nut- shell—not my truth, but that of the gramraar of the English language. London, Thursday.