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THE DISSOLUTION.- - I

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THE DISSOLUTION. I Now that the public mind is so entirely absorbed with the important question of re- form we feel persuaded that our numerous readers will be more disposed to welcome than censure the frequency with which we have lately recurred to the subject. We are much indebted to the Derby ministry for the impetus they have imparted to the agitation by refusing to entertain the question of a resignation, preferring rather to stake their existence on the changes and chances of a dissolution. The progress which the question of reform must necessarily make by its ventilation on the platform, on the hustings, and in the numerous committees and conferences held throughout the country will be worth a whole seven years' session of parliamentary debating. Amongst the fruit already reaped as the result of the dissolution we have Lord John Russell's declaration that he will not obstruct the Ballot if the country will only cry out loud enough for its adoption. In Manchester they are likely to return as a coadiutor to Mr. Bazley, a gentleman wh o is considerably in advance of Mr. Bright himself. In a neigh- bouring city a gentleman who has all his life taken his stand as a Conservative comes for- ward as a candidate and unreservedly avows himself in favour of a R6 franchise in boroughs, and a 910 franchise in counties. The liberal programme of the Conservative excites the fears of one of the sitting members, a scion of one of the wealthiest families of the nobility of England,—who probably regarded his seat more as an heirloom than an honour conferred on him by the electors-and brings out the young Earl" as a canvasser and a platform orator. So far as we can learn from his speech, at the Albion Hotel, in Chester, we regret to sav, he does not outbid his Conservative competitor, but the pressure of circumstances has had considerable effect in compelling the son of one of our proudest peers to pay so large a tribute to public opinion as to conde- scend to pass through the trying ordeal to which the Cestrians hive alra.-idy put him. Like most of his order, we believe Earl Grosvenor has heretofore sought and obtained the suffrages of the electors of the city of Chester with but little personal effort. We regard the dissolution, too, with feelings of satisfaction, because it enables us to get rid of a parliament elected for the express purpose of supporting Lord Palmerston, regardless of his principles or his policy. The only cry was Palmerston, and his lordship looked upon the result with such perfect satisfaction that he immediately forgot the duties and respon- sibilities of the premier, and assumed the airs of the haughty autocrat. His supercilious conduct soon recoiled upon himself, and from being the idol of the House he became almost a nonentity. Still the character of the House remained essentially the same. Returned in a moment of national infatuation to keep in office a nominal liberal minister, it submitted to the ignominy of being ruled by a Conservative, it may be said to have had no character at all. The people now understand what they are fighting for, instead of "Palmerston or Nobody," it is "Reform or No reform." The issue is fairly before them, and if we can keep our rulers from meddling with the affairs of our neighbours at the present critical juncture, there will be nothing to abstract their atten- tion from it. There can be little doubt that the present appeal to the country will result in a majoiity adverse to the present administration. Conser- vatives themselves seem hardly disposed to ques- tion this. The battle will evidently be well fought, for we observe Conservative candidates starting up in all directions. The sinews of war are al- ready supplied with a lavish hand, and it is said that Earl Derby himself, notwithstanding his affected indifference to office, has headed the list of subscriptions for electioneering purposes, with a sum that would of itself be a handsome fortune. But in spite of all this we shall be much disappointed if Lord Derby's j appeal to the country does not return to par- liament a majority who will be disposed to settle the reform question upon a much broader basis than his lordship. The first trial of strength, we presume, will be an amendment on the address in response to the Queen's speech. Assuming that the Tories are thoroughly discomfitted, Lord John Russell will once again have the question entirely in his hands-probably the last chance he will ever have, and we trust he will be found equal to the occasion, and acquit himself in a manner worthy of his former efforts and victories in the great cause of reform.

ELECTION OF GUARDIANS. I

- THE VACANT SEE OF BANGOR.…

BOROUGH MAGISTRATES' COURT.…

-COUNTY MAGISTRATES' COURT.…

MEETING OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENTI…

WREXHAM BOARD OF GUARDIANS.…

[No title]

ITHE AUDITOR AND THE CJUNTY…

ELLESMERE.-I

ELECTION INTELLIGENCE.

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