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A " 1 \'EnSAHY 01' TIE RECHA…

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A 1 \'EnSAHY 01' TIE RECHA mTE j '• )u M uiday last th-; members of tin*: local ti nt <.r lodge of Rocbabitcs held their ann'versaryiht.hc Temperance Hall. The name of the tent is Cam- bria's < !lory,v and it is in a most prosperous st?te The nrst portion of the eeb;brat!on of theanniver? sary M;IS a meat tea, which was of a very liberd ami sumptuous description, ami reneeted n'at credit upon Mr Dodd, of Uw Cocoa Rooms Hndi- street, to whose experienced care the catering was I left. The urns at the various tables, which were laid crossways of the hall, wci- presided over by scveial ladies whose inteiest in the Temperance v. oi k thus took a very practical form. From the appearance of those friends who partook of the things, all dIll well and the waiting arrange- n?nt?, toanks to good management. ,,?ere as per- tmtasp<tssih]e. j At 7.:{0 a puL!ic meeting w?s )ield, which was ? Mel) attended, there being upwards of 500 persons l'n:ent. The Rev. D. Howc!), vicar, presided, and was supported on the pJatform by the Revs. 1. •Tonkins, H. J. Haffer, D. Rli" ys-denkins, Messrs. .1. H. Rawlins, J. W. Jones. Samuel Ellis, W. Lester, T. Cunliffe (deputation), and Mr John Smith, the indefatigable and obliging secretary. After hymn 37 in Sankej's collection had been "1111, the Rev. 1). lthvs Jenkins offcre(I prayer. The Vicar said he should reserveany few remarks that he had to make until the close of the meeting. It ITa \'C him very great and sincere pleasure to be present that night, l'leasure to his very heart, for he was heart and soul in the work of Temperance. (Apphnv-e.) Mr James Davies then sang, "He wipes a tear from i v. ry eye," in a feeling manner, and was ac- e-.mpanl'd on the piano by Mr C. W. Thomas, who -),-te(I as accompanist to the songs with his usual skill and ability. A number of letters had been received by the secretary from gentlemen in the neighbourhood, r^retting inability to attend the anniversary, in- cluding the following from Sir R. A. Cunliffe, Bart., :\1.P. House of Commons Library, August 17th, 18S0. DKAII SIR,—I heg to acknowledge your letter of 10th, II liieh seems to have been delayed in reaching me here. I shall he very glad to attend if possible, the meeting of the Cambria's Glory Tent Anniversary, on Monday, 30th, in accordance with the invitation you have been good enough to send me from your committee; but the present state of public business obliges me to give only a qualified promise as I fear it is uncertain to say within several tlavs at what period the important work now before the House wi I lie finishe(I.-I am, dear sir, yours faithfully, he Mr J. Smith, Secretary. R. A. CU.NLII FE. Mr John Smith, the secretary, then read the following report :— CIIAIIIMA.v, LADIES AND OKXTLEMEN',—At this, our aunual gathering, it falls to my lot as secretary of the Tent, to u nder some account respecting our p sition as a Benefit Society. And it may not lie out of place to state that it is now upwards of:38 vea, s since the present RechabiteTent was I' first opened in Wrexham, and during that time, notwith- standing the many obstacles it has had to encounter, it has ;d\v;ivs been able to hold its own, and it now forms one of the most iinpoi taut Tents in the Chester district, which comprises uleven different Tents or clubs with a meUlher- >hip of ;ibrut ;>5il, and a total worth of £1,:S2. The object* of our Society are, first—promotion and spread of teetotalism secondly, to raise funds by a gradu- ated scale of contributions, in order to ensure to its mem- bers a > payment in sickness and for insuring a sum -f money to lie paid on the death of a member or his wife; aid thirdly, t >r providing members with assistance when travelling in search of employment. The Order has adopted the ;;radu-Jed scale of contributions as a permissive measure, and the laws are certified and registered accord- !)).; to Act ot Parliament. Its funds are established on the j share principle, and a member can have from two to six shares in the sick fund, which would secure to llilU from 5s to Jos per in sickness, according to the number of shares talcn The funeral fund is also in shares, anil a 1 member can have fr4iiii two to four shares for himself and wife, which should secure from £ 10 to £ 20 at death. So that a persun can adapt his payments according to his means. I Each member only pays for the amount of shares he secures, either on his own or his wife's account, that is he nllly pay:, for what lie gets, and gets what he pays for which is a more just and equitable principle than charging all alike, whether married or single and every total ab- stabler, of sound constitution, is eligible for membership, and none other, for this is really our stronghold, and we have proved it to be a safe guarantee that total abstainers are less liable to sickness than the drunkard, or even the moderate diinker, and such heing ,the case, all we ask is, that total abstainers will join our ranks in preference to •tiler societies, where there is no difference made betwixt the teetotaler and the non-teetotaler. And as a proof of this, nm' own tent fully bears out, we have had no death amongst our members since August, lSjü-more than four years ago. Our members are those who are the least likely to require sick benefit, not sir, that we ever sin-ink from paying members when sick, for all our pay- ments are mule promptly, and we hold that when a member pays his contributions into a Friendly Society, when he is Ln health, he has a perfect right to claim his sick allowance when ill. At the end of last year we numbered UK) members, the average age being a little over 3;; years, the number of members who had been ill during the year was 24. The total worth of the Tent was < £ 381 J8s (hi, this is exclusive of the funeral fund which is upwards of £ 250, making a total worth per member of £3 15s lid. In conclusion, 1 trust the report recommends itself to all teetotalers as a good, sound and beneficial order, with- out enumerating the noble principles of total abstinence from all intoxicants, and perhaps I may be allowed to state that it cannot be excelled, if equalled, by any other order based on temperance principles, or otherwise, and only cequiries personal and eollective efforts to make the Tent even mere prosperous in the future than it has been in the past. The Chairman said he hoped they had all paid attention to the report which had just been read, and to one item he should like to direct their special attention, which was the fact that no mem- ber had (lied since 1 S7G! (Applause.) That was, he thought, an irresistible argument in favor of temperance, which should be well known by all. (Hear, hear.) A (flee Party then sang I- Ftii- Flora decks. The glee was rendered in a very nice manner. The Chairman then introduced the deputation, Mr Thomas Cunliffe, editor of the I'cchd.Mtc Maya- and (rimrd' ian. ii- ) io -as receive d with Mr CunUi! P.H.C.R., who was received with applause, said it gave him great pleasure to come from Lancashire to Wrexham in order to say some- thing in favor of Rechabitism. (Hear, hear.) The Order was Republican, for the youngest member might become one of the highest officials in the Order, but at the same time they were intensely conservative, not Conservative with a capital C— but in the way in which they protected the in- terests of the Order and also the members. After briefly detailing its origin, he went on to give some facts with reference to it. The Order which he was there to represent had about thirty-five thou- sand members connected with it, and it had branches not only throughout Great Britain and the Channel Islands, but if they went to the Auti- podes they would find a large number of Rechabites there under British, jurisdiction. In the Victoria district, which was established a few years ago, the members at the present moment numbered i about six thousand, with the same results in favor of total abstinence as had been obtained by the i Order in this country. He desired it to be dis- tinctly understood that the Recliabites were not in antagonism to any other existing friendly society. The Oddfellows, the Foresters, and other kindred associations had been, and still were doing a great and important work in this country, and the Recliabites took all that was good belonging to those other societies, but left out that which, in their opinion, was bad. And they contended that experience had gone to prove that by their ab- stinence from intoxicating drinks they had a de- cided I'?wer rate of mortality and less sickness, and that when sickness overtook them they recovered sooner and lived longer. (Hear, hear.) AV- haten-er others intended to do, his intention was to live as long as he cou ld—(hear, hear, and lau-liter)-aiid if those v. hom lie was addressing desired to do the s^me, all they had to do was to join the Recha- bites. In the early days of the Society the charge made against them was that they were certain not to live very long, but now the complaint against them was that they would not die. (Laughter and applause.) It was always a very difficult thing to make statistics interesting, but if they would bear with him for a few minutes he thought he could furnish them with a few facts concerning Rechabitism which they would find worthy of their attention and consideration. In connection with other friendly societies they had been en- j deavouring. for some time past, to determine, by means of the best statistics they could obtain, which society it was most desirable to join, be- cause he supposed it would be at once admitted that if a man could become connected with a society in which the mortality was only twelve per cent., it was far better than joining one where the mortality was 24 or 26 per ecnt., seeing that the chance of living in the one was about double that of the other. In his own district at Bolton,a manu- facturing district where they certainly had not so pure an atmosphere as in Wrexham, but were lost in smoke and dirt, they were able to shew the ad- vantage of abstinence principles in a way that was very marked, when compared with the Odd-fellows, J against whom, of course, they had nothing to say, except that they allowed their members to partake of intoxicating drinks. In a year in which fever was raging-in lSi4-the Rechahitcs in Darwen J had 104members, and only three deaths, while the Odd-fellows had nineteen deaths out of 020 mem- bers the rate of mortality in the former case being IS per thousand, and in the latter .51 per thousand. The pu blicans in Darwen, that year, died at the enormous rate of 1.10 per thousand, shewing that the scourge which they administered to other people sometimes came back upon themselves. one Rechabite that died there ere eight publicans, and he thought this alone was sufficient to shew the advantage of such an Order as that whose principles he was there that day to ad\ocate. I he sickness in that year was even more marked than the mortality, for white the- Recliabites, ,ho ¡ charged a lower fee than the Odd-fellows made a gain of about ,tit! on the year, the Odd-fellows made a loss of over £ 90, their members I stricken down by fever in much larger proportion than the others. It was just the same when they had the cholera in the North. Those who took the drink were swept away those who abstained from it were free from the disease. The iiiot-talit3, of any friendly society was verv much better than the ordinary mortality of large towns; that was to say that the ordinary mortality of large towns varied from oO to 36 per thousand while the murtality ûf frienillv societies generally was about 24 per thousand. But tl\"t of the Recliabites, taking the whole country round, was not more than 12 per thousand. (Applause.) He did not know that he could put before them any- thing more conclusive than this as. all argument in favor of Rechabitism but v.iany other statistics could be produced, all tending in the same direction. Some people, for instance, considered that it was not fair to single out a particular year in which j ever had prevailed, for the purposes of comparison; j and. therefore, in order to test the question they grouped together a larger area of members, with the result that the year IS71;, while the illol-titlitn- amongst the He1;lbitt,s was at the rate of 41i pel' 3,»00 members, the death-rate among the Odd- follows in the same locality was 7-> per It was clear, therefore, that from whatever point of view the matter was judged, the advantage was on the si do of the Recliabites, and he put it to them' confidently that, if they wanted to join the !)Cst friendly society in existence, they must join the Recliabites. (Hear, hear.) The speaker then de- tailell at considerable length an account of a scries of meetings which had been held in the Isle of Man. He pointed out that out of the 2(5,000 souls on the island '2,000 w ere members of the Recliabites, I I} so every eighth person lie met was a participator in the benefits of that order whose claims lie was advocating that night. What were the advantages to be gained by joining the Order. There were little sickness, and, when illness did come, there was a shorter spell of it. He hoped lie had said enough to make them members, and if any present belonged to drinking friendly societies he would say to them, come out from amongst them and join us for we will do you good." (Applause.) After a few words from the Vicar with regard to a club he joined when he was assistant curate in his first parish, and the meetings of which were so detestable as an occasion for drinking that he soon severed his connection with it, the following pro- gramme was then gone tlirou-(,h Song, Ian the Life-Bo:it Rev. J. Jenkins Song "The better lantl" Miss M. Lewis Glee The Sleigh "The Glee Party St)n The Village Blacksmith "Mr Jas. Davie" Song Jack's Yarn" Kev. J. Jenkins Air from Blodwen Miss M. Lewis Glee "He made all Nature Free "The Glee Party Rev. H. J. Haffer then proposed a vote of thanks to the deputation, and in the course of his remarks said that Mr John Bright once stated that great measures were only to be obtained by a repetition of the facts over and over again, at all times and in all places, in season and out of season. So was it with the temperance question. (Hear, hear.) Mr W. Lester seconded the vote of thanks with great pleasure and pointed out how practical a matter it was. The proposition having been put to the meeting and carried, Mr Cunliffe briefly returned thanks. an d carr i e d i Mr J. H. Rawlins proposed, and the Rer. D. Rhys Jenkins seconded, a vote of thanks to the Chairman, who, in replying, said that he was sorry to have to break his word, but like the Irishman in the story he had lost his spach." The question was whether or not that was the best of friendly societies, he would ask them to think the question over as a matter of business. It was every man's business to assist in reclaiming the drunkard." (Applause.) The meeting then broke up. ———— —————

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