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I ME, J AFFRAY'S DEt'EA.L'…

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ME, J AFFRAY'S DEt'EA.L' IN ElSf bTAFFUUDSaiBd. (FtOU OUR STECIiL CORRKSPONDINT.) LICHFIELD, THUit8D Y. As I Beared the Lo.do? and ?orta Wdjtarn i :rh;tu this morning, at Birmingham, en route for this ancient city of LiobfieK a figare miwbt have been seen at the booking-office asking for a ticku to free him to the same ancient apot. It was that of a man in the fu 1 prime and vigour of life. Hia face was radiant; in Lis ooat a flowar jauntily plaoed in the most killing button-hole; with Buperb sdf possession pervading every feature, and aa nnmistakeable tone of ae!f 8uf!ÏJiaot firm. cess indicated by every step. "Hooray" said a little nen boy, all the figure passed on, and down tLe wooden staircase to the departure platform. Hooray reeeboed with querulous indeoision by another little boy in the newspaper interest, as tbe figure, with a look of humility that laid as plainly 118 plain could be, Gentlemen, I am juat the same as ever 1 was, although you have made a member of Parliament of me," ilooped low and took bis seat, in a first-olme clasi carriage, of course; and almost immediately afterwards, the train sped on its way, the two newsboys now concentrating their united energies in one valediotory Hooray." It was Mr. J affray, the Liberal candidate for IS jst Staffordshire, who was on his way to Lichfield, to hear the declaration of the pell. The high sheriff had commenced at eight o'clook in the morning to count over the votes, and the result was to be given as early as possible. It was no anxious mo. ment for Mr. Jaffray-not a bit of it! The resnlt bad been settled long ago by the paper of wbichM. J affray was proprietor. It had been de- cided between bimBelf and the editor-in-chief that the electors of East Staffordshire should have no voice in the election; that Mr. AUaopp, the Conser. vative candidate, was to be nowhere, and that Mr. Jaffray, tLe Liberal candidate, was to be every. wbera. The editor-in-chief had said, and Mr. Jeff ray had inspired the utterance, that" the viotory in East Sldrrd8bire yesterday ifr that it is one there can be no reasonable doubt) .6ttles the :1i:oC:f Devi-:D;Itio,bt) oie,s: I did. The prophetic mood was on, and what was e,si?r than to presage a victory where the card. vsere k. ?th such unerriug preoision. The ¡;:r'bfh ::Id ::t 9,. ¡:;r;ohad in. spired the utterance, that "We cannot, of oourse, give the figures at the polling yosterday, for the High bhwfi does not begin to count the votes nntil this morning, but we can have no doubt whatever tbat the election has resulted in a decided Liberal victory, thus fulfilling the confident expectation which we have ilore than once announced." Pre- cisely so. Chickens were never heretofore reckoned in tbe editorial sanctum in New-street before they were hatched, and why should they be now i There could be "no doubt whatever" existing on the point, and no doubt whatever was t xprcted to exibt tbereon whenever the prophetic presage was read. The editor-in-chief bad said, and Mr. Jaffray had inspired the utterances, that the Liberal canvass had been conducted by skilled cgmtB and voluntary oanvaasers, whose information, from their experience and booesty,could bstrusted tbat "it was not considered desirable during tne contest to publish the figures of the canvass, or to do more than state the general conoluvion which tbuejutifi"d;" tht we may nowa*y that, 011 Friday night, the canvass showed a result which, barring accidents beyond the reach of calculation, rendered the Liberal success a matter of cortainty, and on thia information we predict a triumphant issue;" tbat, "yesterday morning, just as the poll opened, tL. f..l .tate of tbe cauvass was made up by the Liberal agent, and, taking the public into our COD fin. nee, we will give the figuresthat" there were 3 428 promises for Jaffray, and 2,516 promises for Allsopp j" that" there oould consequently be no doubt that Mr Jallray, the Liberal candidate, is returned by a good, and probably by a large, majority;" that the bast evidence that these iigureB can be relied upon is afforded by the charac- ter of the Liberal canvassers, and by the fact that, as reported from all quarters, the Liberal voters came up to redeem their pledges with such promp. titude an to fully satisfy tbe canvassers to whom thote pledges had been made." So spxke the editor-in-chief of the local paper of wbich Mr. Jallray, tbeLiberalcndidate, is the pro- prietor, this very morning on which the poll was to be deolared. It was magnanimous, though, for us to" hlle the pnblio into our oontiienoe," and to tell them that Mr. Jaffray is returned by a good and, probably, by a very large majority," long before the high sheriff knew it himself, or the eleotcra had ever dreamed of it. Here was the prophetic wisiom of the serpent combined with the kind-hearted magnanimity of the dove. bU. Jaffray had had 9110 more promises than Mr. Allsopp, and, con- sequently, Mr. Jaffray is "returned II, a good, and probably by a ery IStRe, majority." No wonder Mr. Juffiay went on to Lichfield buoyantly and light, when his retnrn for East Staffordshire had thus been seemed, "beyond all doubt," by his editor-in- chief, to the complete satisfaction of himself, and of that distinguished electioneering prophet, whoever he may be. Presto! The scene is changod. It is in the guildhall of the old cathedral town of LiohSald. "Order!" The high sheriff of the oounty speaks. There is an anxious crowd assemble!, and all are bnshed into stillness while the high sheriff declares the result of the previous day's polling. "Tbere are," e&)B that gentleman, "three thousand, six .re,?red, and thirty votes for Mr. All.opp" (a slight sensation among the crowd on hearing the Conseivative candidate named tirai), and two thouiand" (hooray !), "six hundred" (hooray!! hooray !), "and nincty-threo for Mr. Jaffray" ("boorsy," uproar, and emotional displaj); "majority for AUaopp, nine hundred aud thirty- seven. Again is the scene changed. It is at the George Hotel, A small party are assauibl.d In the con- miftee-room of Mr. Jaffray, who is amongst them. "Betr luck next time," ia suggested by one of the party Lot tley all look tbouh Lbey 'ReuH rather Lave luck no.. Teere is wet bi,.k?t ?a the pro' ceedings, and everybody looks uncomfortable in tbo supreme degree. Th3 loud "hoorays" float up from the Swan Hotel below. It is Mr. Allsopp, the Conservative candi- date—tbe now member of Parliament for East Staf- fordshire- addressing the large assembly from au upper window of tbe hotel. Ho speaks words of tbaLks inr the honour conferred upon him, and for tbe coi fidencs placed in him, and in a few manly rt marks ateures the assembly that that confilemea shall not hi mipplaoed. His father is tbere-tbe bead of the great brewery firm long ago mad., fnmous. The father's heart beams in his face, and bonet pride at his son's success lights up his 'Y" now humid with pleasurable excitement. Aud uill the loud cheers float up to the George, and fall drearily upon the small discon- solate party assembled therein. In loss than two botas atter Mr. Jafiray lolt Birmingham for Lichfield. I find, him sitting in the return train at Lichfield station, booked for Birmingham again. But what a leason has he not been taught ia the meantime! He started from his home, but two Bhort bouri before, radiant with hope ahd canviuced of the result which had been so cleverly foretold by his editor-in chief, giving him "a good, and probably a large majority." He now sits moodily in the corner of the earriage, the window of which is up. Tbe o..t'fi?.tio. of defeat is too pii.1 6tamd upon bi?i faoe t? be overlooked. Tbe tr.iy? has not yet started. "Threo ohecrs for Jaffray," is suggested by one ef a score of loiterers, on the plat- form. A significant his. is the only respoasa. "Tbree gioans for Jaffray," shouts another, and the groans are given right lustily, without the slightest attempt at avy counter demonstration. The train moves off, bearing the defeated Liberal candidate back to Birmingham, a "sadder" and a "wiser man." On my way to Liohfiald, in the morning, an enterprising fellow-traveller offered to bet me "10 to 1 on Jaffray." On my return to Birmingham in the afternoon, tho same enterprising traveller who alighted at Walaall Bwora with sullen determination that" if be bad the electioneering prophet bandy," who had induced him to make a boffer of the bodds," he wouldn't propbeoyagdoill" in a hurry. Tiie Rada have got a wollopin to. day they won't soon forget," said anothsr fellow- traveller. "Sane 'em right," said a third, adding, "tbongb I'm a Liberal myself." A fourth descan- ted on the folly of making what ba called cook sure" of anything; while a fifth wondered how the editorial prophet, who had so misled the knowing ones, would square it in his next issue," so as to come out right," wbioh a sixth recorded as his deliberate conviction be would" never be able to do, 10 kelp his bob.' Electioneering literature was by no means spiring throughout the district. Every boarding sparkled with placards, the great majority of which appeared to be the result of Liberal enter- prise and genius. Electors were frantioally called upon, through the medium of posterB lIB big as a door, to "vote for Jaffray, the working man's friend." Another typographical assertion went the round of the posting stations, to the effect that tbe constituency would have" No Tory for East Staffordshire" statement the play. ful irony of which, after the declaration of the noil, must b.,e be,. ppreciatel by all. "A farmer" spoke to "farmers," ?hrragh the medium of an immense broadside, calling on the elec\ors to vote for JafTrry," because he "understands tenant tight;" another was sweet upon him bocauae be "can express wbat he knows," and t-doienar security of tenure," being "the best man in the interest of the farmer," The following poetio gem sparkled thickly, as a large poster, at every avail. able point, an elector being overheard to speak ir- reverently of it as a I, spooney" attempt: SO Sr«»N MEAT. I To hold out a 00' may ba sometimes goal For people too f?ble for 80lld food But men wb ? atmg ..d ,i,. will drop The political f.t whore the fare's All-dopp! Another e.krpr,g electioneering poet, who will evidently supplant Tennyson one of these days, and blot ont the reoollection of the famous Billy Nutts." gives to the world the following me TUa oi THE Tar, I In politioa AUIopp doe. nt know 10 -lit d- I Vhat be cnght to oay-where be eaght to go ?. spite of '• my 6, .it. i? h I.r Hi. political tap runs Tery small beer. TbelÏo:c;lh":ibilt; also extensively cir. culated, bowinR that the Liberal candidate had scarcely acted with that discretion for whiob many gave him cred t To Printers.—Printers having votes in the East Staffordshire election are requested to withhold their voteB from the Liberal candidate, who has shown his Liberalism by executing the who.a of the print- ing required in this eleotion at his own establish- ment-Birminghwn- out of the county. Don't rota for JAffray." Whatever infinenoes may have operated to im, press the closing injunction of the foregoing upon the minds of the electors, it is quite clear that never was an election made more oertain of than that East Staffordshire was by the Liberals, and never was disappointment greater. Just in proportion as the certainty 01 success was proclaimed by the organ of the defeated candidate, "in prophetic mood arrayed," so is the sting of defeat the more painful. To repeat the words of the prophet: The victory in East Staffordshire yesterday" (whioh viotory turned out to be a defeat for the party in whose be. half the words were written) settles the qnastion of Conservative reaction." So it does, bat in what a different sense from that intended to be convoyed by the writer! It is, however, satisfactory to hear from the Liberal cump that the question of a Conser- vative ceattioa iA "Settled" at last, though the I futur" (nemtion will doubt hitory wb-- thev -aO ■ tbat eltl!tment jec rutJ .the wo "I ?Ar. Jsff 'y, i WbOE8 eMM! p?Ayet Lhd pwh-P,,Iu" tam<Mt M I tbo last.

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