Hide Articles List

13 articles on this Page

IAMERICA.I

Detailed Lists, Results and Guides
Cite
Share

AMERICA. ARRIVAL OF THE EUROPA, I W I L KE S BOOTH SHO". I CAPTURE OF HIS ACCOMPLICE. I New York, April 28, One a.m.—Mr. Stanton reports to-day that Booth, and Harrold, his accomplice, were chased from a swamp in St. Mary's county, Maryland, to Garrett's Farm, near Port Royal, on the Rappahan- nock, by Colonel Baker's detectives. The barn in which they took refuge was fired. Booth was shot and killed. Harrold was captured. Booth's body and Harrold are now in Washington. The following further particulars have been received: -It appears that Booth and Harrold, dressed in Con- federate uniforms, reached Garrett's farm several days ago. Booth was wounded. It is believed that he fell from his horse and fractured his leg on the night of his escape from Washington. In conversation he denounc- ed Lincoln's assassination, and said that the reward offered would doubtless be increased to half a million. The Garretts, when arrested, asserted that they did not suspect it was Booth. Canadian bills for a large amount were found upon him. Harrold remains uncomm u nicative. Booth was shot through the head; he lingered for three hours. His foot also was injured, and he used crutches. The cavalry who surrounded the barn sum- moned Booth and Harrold to surrender. The latter seemed inclined to acquiesce, but Booth accused him of cowardice. After the barn was fired Harrold surrender- j ed, but Booth shot at the cavalry sergeant, who returned the fire and killed him. It is supposed that Harrold is an accomplice of the assassin who attacked Seward. Doctor Mudd, of Maryland, set Booth's leg, and suppliefl,hitn with crutches. Mudd has been arrested, Booth's brother, Junius Brutus has also been ar- rested. The Confederates burned 94,000 bales of cotton before evacuating. A1 ontgomery. New York, April 27, Afternoon.- Mr. Lincoln's re- mains were conveyed on Tuesday, amid popular demon- strations of mourning, from the City Hall to the depot en route for Albany, followed by the largest procession ever assembled in New York, including the foreign 1 consuls, detachments of military, and large numbers of citizens and coloured people. Masses of people lined the streets through which the procession passed. In the evening religious services were held by all the sects in New York. A meeting was also held in Union- square, at which Mr. Bancroft delivered an oration. General Grant reached Raleigh on Momlay,and handed to Sherman the reply of the Government, to his pro- ceedings. Johnston was notified of the termination of the truce, and informed that a military convention could not entertain civil inatteis, Halleck has ordered Meade, Sheridan, and Wright to push forward and cut off Johnston's retreat, regard- less of orders from any one except Lmnt, on the ground that Sherman's agreement bound his command only. Canby and Thomas have been ordered to push the enemy in every direction. Sherman was aware of Mr. Lin- coln's assassination before concluding the agreement with Johnston. The newspaper correspondents assert that Johnston offered to surrender on the same terms as Lee, but Sherman claimed full powers and granted more favourable conditions. The press generally stigmatise Sherman's proceedings. Some hint at this action being treasonable, others censure Stanton for the severity of his remarks concerning Sherman. It is reported that J efferson Davis was atHillsborough during Sherman's negotiations, and wrote the terms of Johnston's surrender. Other accounts say that Davis had previously left Hillsborough for the Trans-Missis- sippi Department, escorted by 200 cavalry. According to a rumour, not considered trustworthy, he crossed the Mississippi at Turkey Bend on the 16th inst. A Hichmond banker has received information that Davis is having specie estimated at from 6,000,000 dols. to 13,000,000 dols. conveyed in waggons south from Goldsboro. The A ttorney-General has given an opinion denying the right of paroled Confederates to take up their resi- dences or to wear the Confederate uniform in the loyal states. Paroled prisoners have been ordered to divest them- selves of their uniform. The Governor of Western Virginia is said to have been instructed to establish a State Government, and a3- semble a loyal Legislature in Hichmond. Mr. W. H. Seward is rapidly progressing towards con- valescence. His son also is daily improving. The New York Assembly has adopted the Central Railroad Fare Bill. The people have petitioned the governor to vote the bill. New York, April 25, IToou.-Business was entirely suspended yesterday and to-day. Mr. Lincoln's remains lay in state in Independence Hall, Philadelphia, on Saturday and Sunday. On the whole route from Washington there were great popular demonstrations of mourning. The remains arrived in New York yesterday, and lie in state in the City Hall. The funeral procession will take place to-day. A courier reached Washington on Friday, announcing that Sherman had agreed upon a temporary suspension of hostilities, and had arranged terms of peace on the 18th with Johnston, Brekenridge being present. John- son and the Cabinet unanimously disapproved of Sher- man's action, and ordered him to resume hostilities. Sherman was informed that Mr. Lincoln's instructions to Grant on the 3rd March had been to hold no con- ference with Lee, except as a preliminary to surrender, and these instructions were approved and reiterated by President Johnson to govern the action of the military commanders. Grant immediately left for North Caro- lina to direct the operations against Johnston. The terms arranged between Johnston and Sherman, subject to the ratification of their respective governments, were as follows: -Forty -eight hours' notice to bo given of the renewal of hostilities. The Confederate armies to be disbanded, and deposit their arms and public property in the State capitals, subject to the action of the State and Federal authorities. The Federal executive to re- cognise the State government. The Supreme Court to decide upon the legitimacy of the conflicting State go- vernments caused by the war. The Federal authorities to guarantee to the people civil and political rights so long as they obey the laws. Finally, a general amnesty to be proclaimed, and the war to cease. The Federal Government disapproved of Sherman's proceedings as an improper assumption of authority. His agreement, it was considered, practically acknow- ledged the rebel government, prevented confiscation, and the punishment of rebels, and would enable the rebels to re-establish State governments with slavery. It might also render the Government responsible for the debt, found no basis for a lasting peace, and would ena- ble the rebels to renew the war when their strength was recruited. Mr. Stanton apprehends that Sherman's suspension of hostilities will enable Davis to escape to Mexico or Europe with the plunder of the Richmond banks and other accumulations. Sherman issued an order to his army on the 16th an- nouncing the suspension of hostilities, and stating that the agreement with Johnston, when ratified, would make peace from the Potomac to the Rio Grande. He hoped soon to conduct the soldiers home. Correspondents state that the assassination of Lincoln had caused bitter feelings among Sherman's troops, who received the armistice order very eoldly. Wilson occupied Macon on the 20th, taking Howell Cobb, Gustavus Smith, and others prisoners. All claimed the benefit of the armistice. Sherman directed Wilson to withdraw from Macon until further orders, unless he believed the rebels were changing their status to the pre- judice of the Federals. Several members of the Carolina Legislature are en route to Raleigh to negotiate the restoration of the state to the Union. General Canby reports that he captured in Mobile and the defences on the west side of the bay 150 guns, 1,000 prisoners, and 3,000 bales of cotton. Un- official accounts states that altogether 3,000 guns, 20,000 to 30,000 bales of cotton, and several gunboats were captured at Mobile. A blockade runner, with 1,000 bales of cotton on board, was captured up the river. Smith's corps is marching on Montgomery. The army of the Potomac remains in the vicinity of the South Side Railroad. Nearly all Mosby's command, including the officers, except Mosby himself, have surrendered. Kirby Smith's army is said to be disbanding. General Halleck's command embraces the department of Vir- ginia, the army of the Potomac, and such parts of North Carolina as are not occupied by Sherman. General Ord retains his command for the present, but is to report to Halleck. The Government has furnished passports and passages to Halifax to those officers of Lee's army who desire to leave the country. Two sentries have been shot at Richmond by some un- known individuals. President Johnson has made a speech, in which he states that the rebel leaders must be punished, and im- poverished, and their social position destroyed. Union men in the Confederacy should be remunerated from the pockets of those who had brought suffering upon the country. He advocated leniency to the Southern masses, but was equally opposed to dissolution and to consolidation. He attributed the assassination of Mr. Lincoln to the fiendish spirit of the rebellion, and ap- pointed the 25th May to be a day of mourning and hu- miliation on account of Mr. Lincoln's death. Mr. Stanton has announced that he has received in- formation that the murder of the President was organis- ed in Canada, and approved in Richmond. He says the assassin who attempted Mr. Seward's life is now in prison, and is believed to be a St. Alban's raider. Telegraphic communications is open between Francis- co and British Columbia. The Bremen and City of Washington have arrived out. New York, April 21.-The War Departrriwit, on the 21st, received despatches from General Sherman, enclos- ing the following agreement between himself and Gen- eral Iolintson for the disbanding of the Confederate armies and the restoration of peace. General Breken- ridge has approved the agreement upon the Confederate side. Memorandum of basis of agreement made this 18th day of April, 1865, near Durham's Station, and in the State of North Carolina, by and between General Joseph E. Johnston, commanding the Confederate army, and Major-General W. T. Sherman, commanding the army of the United States in North Carolina, both pre- sent :— 1. The contending armies now in the field to maintain their status quo until notice is given by the commanding general of either one to its opponeut, and reasonable time (say 48 hours) allowed. 2. The Confederate armies now in existenca to be dis- banded and conducted to their several State capitals, there to deposit their arms and public property in the State arsenal, and each officer and man to execute and fill an agreement to cease from acts of war, and abide the action of both State and Federal authorities. The number of arms and munitions of war to be reported to the chief of ordnance at Washington city, subject to future action of the Congress of the United States, and in the meantime to be used solely to maintain peace and order within the borders of the States respectively. 3. The recognition by the Executive of the United States of several State Governments, on their officers and legislatures taking the oath prescribed by the con- stitution of the United States; and where conflicting State Government have resulted from the war, the legi- timacy of all snail be submitted to the supreme court of the United States. 4. The re-establishment of all Federal courts in the several States, with powers as defined by the constitution and laws of Congress. 5. The people and inhabitants of all States to be guaranteed, so far as the Executive can, their political rights and franchise, as well as their rights of persons and property, asdefined by the constitution of the United States, and of states respectively. 6. The executive authority of the Government of the United States not to disturb any of the people by reason of the late war, so long as they live in peace and quiet, abstain from acts of armed hostility, and obey the laws in existence at any place of their residence. 7. In general terms, war to cease; a general amnesty, so far as the executive power of the United States can command, or on condition of the disbandment of the Confederate armies, and the distribution of arms and resumption of peaceful pursuits by ofifcers and others hitherto composing the said armies. Not being fully empowered by our respective principals to fulfil these terms, we individually and officially pledge ourselves to promptly obtain necessary authority and to carry out the above programme. W. T. SHKUMAN, Major-General Commanding the Army of the United States in North Carolina. J. E. JOHNSTON, General Commanding Confederate States Army in North Carolina. SURRENDER OF GENERAL JONHSTON AND THE CONFEDERATE ARMIES. ARRIVAL OF THE BELGIAN. The Liverpool and Montreal Ocean Steamship Com- pany's screw steamer Belgian, Captain Wilie, from Port- land on the 29th ultimo, arrived in the Mersey on IVed- nesday night. She brought 53 pSssengers. NEW YORK, April 20th, three p.m.—The following are the heads of the news brought by the Belgian :— Grant reports that Johnston surrendered his army on the 26th instant to Sherman, including all the forces from Raleigh to the Chattahoochie. Johnston obtaitiecl similar terms as on the occasion of Lee's sur- I render. The Secretary of War has ordered the immediate curtailment of the military preparations and expen- diture. Mr. Jeff. Davis has reached South Carolina. Booth has been buried privately by the War Depart- ment. Mr. Seward is improving. NEW YORK, April 2Stb, evening.-Griint reports from Raleigh, on the 26th, as follows:— Johnston has surren- dered the forces under his command to Sherman, em- bracing all from here to Chattahoochie, on the basis agreed on between myself and Lee for the army of Northern Virginia. 0 Previous to Sherman's truce, Stoneman's comix was very successfully operating against th lIIn<l federates in Western North Carolina and South \v n, Virginia. It is reported that Dick Taylor is ready to surre? his army to Canby, if favourable terms are granendet General Hanwell Potter is successfully operatin ?i the interior of South Carolina against the organis t"' dies of Confederates still existing there. Booth has been buried privately by order of the irar Department. at Lewis Paine has been arrested at Mrs. Surratt's house and is now in confinement. He is alleged to be thl person who attempted the life of Mr. Seward. Surratt is still at large. a t The New York Herald asserts that the Governm6"' expenses have been reduced 1,000,000 dols. per da Y si-nce Lee's surrender. The Committee of the Chamber of Commerce bare issued a report protesting against the Government c fiscating the cotton at Savannah or the property take, by the army in the insurrectionary states, unless bel en ing to the rebel government or convicted traitors. urges the Government to recognise the right of rjrivat property in the insurrectionary states. e Two prominent citizens in Philadelphia have be robbed and beaten for alleged sympathy with the rebei lion. Confederate sympathisers are reported to be prepa ing another raid into Vermont, and preparation are being made on the frontier towns to repel an, invasion. The North American has arrived out. NEW YORK, April 29th, morning.—Advices from Newborn state that General Johnston endeavoured to obtain an amnesty and permission for Mr. Davis and other Confederate leaders to leave the country. This Was refused by Grant. According to the Herald the forces surrendered by Johnston include the armies of Tennessee, North Caro. lina, Georgia, and Florida, and the Georgia Militia to- gether with three generals, five lieutenant-generals, 20 major-generals, and 38 brigadier-generals. The only Confederate forces now in the field are Kirby Smith's and Dick Taylor's. It is announced from St. Louis that the remnants of Thomason's and Shelby's commands, from 6,000 to 12,000 strong, are at Pocahontas, Arkansas, preparing to invade Missouri. The Secretary of War has ordered an immediate and extensive curtailment in the Government military ex- penses. The convalescent soldiers in hospitals, officers and soldiers who have been prisoners of war now on furlouoh or on parole, and volunteers recruits in the rendezvous camps, will be immediately and honourably dis. charged. Information has been received at Washington that Jefferson Davis and his companions have reached South Carolina. It was believed they would be intercepted before reaching the Mississippi River. The New York Herald asserts that numerous persons are implicated in Booth's plot, and that it was authorised and aided by the Confederate leaders. The same journal states that Harrold has made a con- fession. M r Seward and his son are steadily improving. President Johnson has appointed June 1 instead of May 25 as a day of humiliation on account of Mr. Lin. coin's death. Prisoners willing to take the oath of allegiance and be. come loyal citizens, and who are proper objects of cle- mency, will be released upon terms which the President shall see fit and consistent with public safety. TIMES TELEGRAM BY THE BELGIAN. The Richmond Whi/j states that President Davis and the members of his Cabinet, with an escort of 2000 cavalry, left Greenshore, North Carolina, on the 14th, for Columbia. They would move westward through Georgia and Alabama to the Mississippi. The Navy Department is reported to have received intelligence that the Confederate ram Stonewall left Teneriffe on the 2nd instant, and is believed to be now in the West Indies. ARRIVAL OF THE CITY OF BALTIMORE. The Inman steamer City of Baltimore, from New York on the 29th ult., arrived at Queenstown at 2 40 p.m., Wednesday. She brings the mails, 5114 dols. and £ 1000 in specie, and 329 passengers. She landed 50 passengers, and proceeded at 3 lOp m. ARRIVAL OF THE GERMANIA, SOUTHAMPTOF, Wednesday Night.—The Hamburg and American Company's steamer Germania, from New York on the 29th ult., passed the Needles at 9 55 p.m.

CANADA.

FRIGHTFUL STEAMBOAT DISASTER.…

PENMAENMAWR.

I TOWYN.

[No title]

THE LATE FIRE AND INQUEST…

FIRE AND LOSS OF LIFE AT LLANBEDR…

THE DENBIGH GRAMMAR SCHOOL…

THE LATE MR. COBDEN. I

PORTMADOC WELSH CHURf'H SERVICES.…

POOR RATES AND THE NEXT GENERAL…

I THOUGHTS BY THE WAY—PENMAENMAWR.