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BODFARI. I

BALA.

CORWEN. I

I CARNARVON.

DENBIGH. I

I HOLYHEAD.

IPORTMADOC. I

RHYL. -I

I-] RUTHIN.

LLANDUDNO.

BANGOR LOCAL BOARD OF HEALTH.

Family Notices

ABERGELE. -I

IAMLWCH. I

IMACHYNLLETH.___

rPWLLHELI.

TOWYN.

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f ——— far exceed the firet held in Dublin and equal to either of those of which London was the scene in 1851 aDd 1862. Dmonstrations continue to be made in England and f the continent respecting the American assassina-  The Prussian Chamber of Deputies, on the 2nd fT presented an address of sympathy to the American lOB" tIed .b '? ?-Nothing is settled yet with respect to the duchies; the proposal to convoke the estates has caused '"excitement amongst the inhabitants. -The King of ?p?giaM passed a good night on Tuesday; he was better yesterday. The Fruptro; of France arrived off Palma on Tues day. He was in excellent health and the steamer *?M not start till 8 in the evening, in order that it ;ight not arrive at Algiers during the night. The Spanish Senate, yesterday, unanimously passed a resolution expressive of horror at the assassination of JIIr. Lincoln, and of sympathy with the people of the United States. A Turin paper asserts, that the result of the inisgon 01 Slnor Vegezzi to Rome is the signature of a concor- dat with the Pope, by which the Pontiff recognizes the Kingdom of Italy; and the Italian government guaran- teeS the exercise of his personal sovereignty in his do. ininions. There is an arrival from New York, with dates to the 22nd of April. The papers notice the solemnization oi Mr. Lincoln's funeral at Washington, with imposing cer^m?" His remains were, however, to be removed ??gj.IJ, nUnois, receiving public honours at every city they p?d through.-?fr. Seward and his son were vlh livin, and better. Two persons were in custody, Jitzerot and Surat, supposed to be Booth's ac- government had offered 100,000 dollars for .?t and that of those who acted with him per- ?.h?unngthem are subject to the penalty of death. The Confederate prisoners at Point Looh-out had passed resolutions of abhorrence at Mr. Lincoln's murder, and expressing sympathy for his family. Mr Johnson had received delegates from various parts of the Union, who came to offer him support. He made speeches to them, indicating no definite policy; but reasserting that treason is the highest crime, and must be punished accordingly.—The New York He. raid" asserts that his foreign policy will be more demon- strative and exacting than that of Mr. Lincoln; and that he is pledgNI to the Monroe doctrine. He had received the diplomatic corps, with an address of con- dolence and Sir Frederick Bruce had presented his credentials. His Excellency expressed deep sympathy at Mr. Lincoln's death, and said that her Majesty had nothing more at heart than to cultivate relations of amity anrl good understanding with America. The President said the interests of civilization and hu- manity required that England and America should be friends. It appears the presence of the Federals is not very welcome at Richmond. The people kept their doors and windows closed but when General Lee arrived on the 15th, he was most enthusiastically received. Jefferson Davis and his cabinet were at Augusta, and had estab- lished a government there, preparatory to a flight to the trans-Mississippi Department.— The news from the armies was still adverse to the Confederates. Kirkpa- trick had pursued them 30 miles beyond Raleigh John- son's army was demoralized, and there was no doubt he would have to surrender.