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I LLANRWST.

I MACHYNLLETH. I

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I MACHYNLLETH. I THE PATENT LIFE PRESERVING APPARATUS Great disappointment was experienced by the inhabi- tants of Aberdovey, the other day. owing to the non- appearance of the enterprising navigator, who purposed making an aquatic excursiou of several miles in a newly- patented apparatus intended for saving life during ship- wrecks and other casualities to which so large a number of our sea-girt islanders are exposed. Our readers at Aberdovey, and other places on the intended route of the enterprising patentee will have their disappointment modified when they are informed that if the experiment was not a perfect success, it was by no means a perfect failure; and we have reason to believe that the good folks who were disappointed, will shortly have another opportunity of witnessing the complete success of the experiment, which all philanthropists, informed of its objects, will anticipate with interest, and accord to the ingenious contriver their hearty sympathies and earnest wishes for success. The mechanician, who has eaayed a task so difficult, is Mr. John Rees, watchmaker, Machynlleth; and he has like many other sanguine and spirited experimen- talists, devoted a large proportion of his leisure time in devising, improving, and endeavouring to perfect an ap- paratus, which if successfully completed, must be con- sidered a desideratum of no ordinary character among the skilful and multifarious contrivances which modern ingenuity has suggested, in order to save life and mitigate physical sufferings. The apparatus I referred to, without attempting to give a full technical explanation of it, may be described as consisting of a water-proof covering for the body, the elasticity of which, is materially enhanced by air tubes, which can be in- inflated at the wearer's pleasure. It is light, so as to render it easy of transit; and it can be compressed into a small compass so as to facilitate that object. It can be readily adjusted, and is so buoyant that the wearer floats in a semi-recumbent position, par- tially on his back, at ease upon the watery pillow upon which he reclines his head, if wearied by a 'ong voyage. Beneath the back is an inflated air-pouch, which is, we presume the chief cause of the buoyancy of the dress. It may be compared in appearance, to the illustration in Pilgrim's Progress, of Christian, with his burden on his shoulders: only it is one lighter to be borne. It is provided with propellors, to secure rapid locomotion through the water,,when the wearer is disposed to make progress his speed being regulated by his own exer- tions. Mr. Rees felt so satisfied with the result of his la- bour, and that it was adapted for the purposes intended, that he determined boldly to exhibit its merits and de- fects to the public, and that in broad daylight, on their own favourite water. He publicly announced his no- vel experiment by means of placards throughout the district. The peculiarity and importance of the experi- ment of our determined fellow-townsman, induced a number of spectators to post themselves on various po- sitions along the banks of the river from Machynlleth to Aberdovey. Lady Vane, Lady Edwards, and a number of the principal inhabitants of the district were present on the occasion, as they felt much interested in the result. Mr. Rees, having equipped himself in his ingenious ha- biliments, launched himself boldly on the clear waters of the Dovey, which ran at that time pretty rapidly. He floated along in good style, apparently with facility and comfort, and proceeded for some short distance with ap- parent confidence in his handiwork, as well as in his safety. He was loudly cheered and applauded by the spectators; but unhappily he appeared to have lost his self-possession, which was probably caused by his anxiety, and his finding himself in an element to which he is by no means accustomed, being an indifferent swimmer. He accordingly altered his plan to proceed to Aberdovey, and landed for the purpose of transferring his apparatus to an adept, who was more accustomed to the treacherous element. An amphibious animal—a fisherman in the neighbourhood, named David Ellis, next donned the magic garment, plunged in, and pro- ceeded along at a glorious rate, paddling away like some sea monster of unknown genus, and no doubt strik- ing the fish with consternation at such a bold invasion of their element. The fisherman continued his course gaily for about a mile, when, by some means, he turned on his face, instead of maintaining the luxuriant semi- recumbent position, and at this juncture, some defect was evidently apparent in the apparatus. He, however, regained the shore, without evincing much incon- venience so that our readers at Aberdovey and else- where, have now a full explanation, and we trust a satis- factory one, too, of the reasons why they were unable to satisfy their curiosity in viewing the advent of the bold navigator, who fully proposes to pay them an early vi- sit when he has modified his complicated contrivance. We understand that a portion of the waterproof fabric was manufactured at Manchester, from designs prepared by Mr. Rees, who has expended much time and money in bringing his patent to its present state of perfection. The price of the dress, when manufactured, will be about X10 or £ 15. Earl Vane and several gentleman in the neighbourhood, have consented to purchase a suit each, if it should prove the thing it is intended to be, namely, an effective life preserver. Mr. Rees informs us of an ingenious magistrate, in the county of Glamorgan, who was most passionately ad- dicted to the gentle piscatorial craft, and who found in his rambles that rivers barred his progress. To remedy this evil, he devoted his constructive faculties to supply a convenience when placed in such predicaments. His persevering labours resulted in the production of an In- dia tubber paletot or light cloak, which in rough weather protected him from wind and rain, and which could be slung over his shoulder by a strap in fine weather. When inflated, this paletot was distended into a boat, which he used in crossing rivers, paddling himself with his hands. We can hope with the author of John Gilpin, under other novel circumstance, that when Mr. Rees does next ride that way (Dovey) may we be there to m.

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