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CONVICTION OF MORGAN, THE…

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INEWS OF THE WEEK.

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I NEWS OF THE WEEK. It is announced that the Queen and Royal Fa- mily will, soon after Easter, leave Windsor for Buckingham Palace, where they will remain a fortnight. The Londoners will be very glad to hail her Majesty's return to her old habitat, though it will be for only a short period. On Thursday week, at seven. p. m. the King of the Belgians arrived at Dover from Calais his Majesty having taken that route because it was a shorter sea voyage than by Ostend. He remain- ed at the Lord Warden Hotel, during the night; and the next morning was conveyed, with his suite, by a special train to Windsor.—The Prince of Wales met King Leopold at the Water- loo Station, and travelled with him to Windsor. After accompanying the King to the Castle, his Royal Highness returned to London. On Satur- day the Princess of Wales held the first drawing- room of the season for her Majesty. All the members of the Royal Family, except the three youngest were present and the presentations were unusually numerous.—On Tuesday, shortly before noon, the Queen, accompanied by the King of the Belgians, and the Princesses Helena and Louise, arrived at Buckingham Palace; where her Majesty held a reception, which was numerously attended. The Queen returned to Windsor, but King Leopold remained at the Pa- lace. A meeting of Bishops of the Roman Catholic Church, was held at the Right Rev. Dr. Olla- thorne's house, in Birmingham, on Thursday week. The object of the meeting, we hear, was to consider the names which are to be submitted to the Pope, as those of Ecclesiastics fitted to succeed to the archiepiscopal office vacated by the death of Cardinal Wiseman. The result of the meeting has not been made known. Lord Brougham, whose name has been brought before the public in connection with the Edmund's scandal, and who, at the time of Lady Brougham's death was indisposed at Cannes,—is now said to be in remarkably good health. He does not in- tend to leave his chateau for Paris till the close of April and will not, therefore, be in London, till May. We are happy to hear, that there is every pro- bability that the dispute in the iron trade will be soon amicably settled. In the North it is vir- tually adjusted, masters and men having come to an understanding and in Staffordshire, the em- ployers and workmen have agreed to meet Lord Lichfield,-and settle their differences by'liis arbi- tration. There was quite a succession of accidents from Friday night till Sunday morning. On Friday night, as the half-past ten express train was ar- riving at Dover, M. Sochaczewski, the agent for the Belgian Government and mail-packet service, was running along the platform, when he came in contact with a post, by which he was knocked over the side of the platform, and the engine and ten- ter went over him, cutting off one arm and leg en- tirely, and otherwise so much injuring him that lie died in an hour. He was sufficiently conscious to say that it was entirely an accident, and no one was in fault.—At half-past two on Saturday morn- ing, a fire was discovered in the Sheffield Theatre, which entirely destroyed the interior.—The same morning, at half-past four, a fire was discovered in Solomon's lodging-house, King-street, West Plymouth, which was soon extinguished, but tour children,—brothers and sisters,—aged 12, 10, 4, and 14 years, were slightly scorched by the fire and completely suffocated by the smoke.—On Sunday morning, some workmen were employed in what was conceived to be a work of necessity, removing a bridge connected with the railway, near Croydon when it suddenly fell, burying six men—two were dead, and three were taken to the hospital, where two of them soon after expired. —The same day the centre roof of the connecting building at the Ludgate-hill Station of the Lon- don, Chatham, aud Dover railway, fell in. Being Sunday, no workmen were about; but the loss will be considerable. On Monday, the Federal Diet of Germany held an extraordinary sitting, and determined by nine votes to six, that the discussion on the proposal of Banaria, in favour of the claims of the Duke of Augustenburg, should take plaee on the 6th of April. On the 25th March, there was a Conference be- tween the majority of the Lower House of the Austrian Reichsrath and Baroh'von Sclimerling, Minister of the Interior. The latter announced that the Government would not make any further reduction in the Budget. Should the Reichsrath, however, resolve on further reductions, the minis- try would leave it to his Majesty to take what stens he thought proper. There was more debat- ing on the 28th, but no decision was come to. The report of the general committee on the budget, was continued in the Prussian Chamber of Deputies on the 23rd ult. On that day, the Minister of War said, if the propositions of the Committee were adopted, the Government would know that the Chamber aimed to extend its own power, and to circumscribe the rights of the crown. "Until now," hesaid, "the Government was held fast to the constitution. It does so still, and desired to end the present disturbed state of things. For that purpose you must co-operate with the Government. Should you re- fuse, the question will be no longer one of rights but one of existence. Make your choice." 'It seems the Deputies have made it. On Monday, the Chamber adopted all the general proposals of the Finance Committee, and also the additional motion of Hirr Virchow, that the Government should immediately apply the proposals of the Committee to the budget for 1865. The author and printer of a satire on the Vie de Ceasar," were tried on the 23rd ult., for insult- ing the Emperor; the former in his absence. They were fined 500 f. each, and the priiiter to be im- prisoned for one month. The author is to be im- prisoned for five years if he is caught. The de- bate on the address in the Legislative Chamber commenced on Monday afternoon when it will end no one can say, as 12 or 13 amendments will be moved and about 100 members have given notice of their intention to speak. The only im- portant speech, as yet, has been one by M. Emile Olliver, recounting in a great measure his former opinions. The majority of the Italian Chamber of Depu- ties, on Saturday, declared in favour of the loan, and the other ministerial projects except the proposed modification of the existing stamp and registration laws. It is reported at Rome and Paris, and believed —though the Constitutionnel contradicts the state- ment, and Le Monde, which first propagated it, has received a warning,—that the Pope, in an in- terview withM. de Sartiges, who wastalkingof the withdrawal of the French troops, asked him why he could not withdraw them at once, and not talk about it ? On the 20th, the Russian ambassador at Rome gave a grand banquet in honor of Gen. M'Clellan, who has been some time in that city. -Gen. Montebello, in a despatch dated the 22nd, is said to have sent large reinforcements to ope- rate against the brigands on the Roman frontier between whom and the ex-King of Naples, some connection is asserted to exist, from documents found on the peisons of brigands. A letter, signed J. Mazzini," was addressed to a paper recently started at Turin, called "The Courier of the Little Country at the Foot of the Alps," and has gone the round of the Italian pa- pers, which has excited much agitation. The writer asserts that there is in the foreign office, "a roll of 8 pages, written on stout English paper and bound with a blue satin ribbon," which is, in fact, a secret protocol, added to the convention of the 15th of September," by which the Italian Government is bound to refrain from all at- tempts against Veuetia and to repress with en- ergy, all such attempts by the party of action, or others." If, however, by unforeseen events, Italy requires either Rome or Venice, the French fron- tier is to be again adjusted and the river Lesia is to be the boundary of France. General Delia Marmora, the Italian Prime Minister, and Vis- conti Venosta, the late Foreign Minister, deny the existence of any such protocol whilst the minis- terial organs treat the letter with contempt. Amongst the people, some deem it genuine, others denounce it as a forgery. At Vienna, an outbreak in Venetia is appre- hended. General Benedeck has been ordered to adopt the same measures as were successfully car- ried out last year. On the 22nd ult., the Spanish minister sub- mitted his budget to the Congress. The ordinary expenditure is estimated at 2,139,703,680 reals, the extraordinary at 553,718,190 reals total, 2,693,321,870 reals or £ 26,934,218. The ordinary revenue is estimated at 2,184,178,130 reals, ( £ 21,841,781). The deficiency is to be covered by the proceeds of the sale of the national proper- ty.—On the 24th, the bill proposing to raise 300 millions of reals by the anticipated payment of taxes, was agreed to by 142 to 79 votes. On that day, there was a rumour of a successful insurrec- tion at St. Domingo, in favour of the Spaniards. The subject was mentioned in the Congress, on Monday; and Senor BesRavede explained, that it was greatly to the interest of opain to abandon St. Domingo, and content herself with any com- mercial advantages she may thus attain a speech which was received with great applause. M. Renan recently arrive at Athens. He was favourably received by the King and the people complain of the facility with which his Majesty granted an audience to the "preacher ot material- ism," as they call the Frenchman. It would ap- pear, that the author of the Life of Jesus," is appointed master of the French School at Athens; and the Bishop of Car; stia, imagining, erroneous- ly, that the Institution belongs to Greece, has, in a letter to the journals, complained of the ap- pointment, and called for the immediate depar- ture of M. Renan. From Quebec, under date of March 16, we learn, that the Canadian Government had pro- posedavote of 1,000,000 dollars, forthe permanent defence of the country; and 350,000 dollars for the expense of volunteers on the frontier. The Finance Minister announced, that the Govern- ment must maintaiii the police and militia on the frontier, so long as the war lasted, and fulfill their duty as good neighbours to the States.—On the 14th ult., in the Parliament, an address to her Majesty, approving of the union of the colonies, was carried by 91 to 33 votes. Intelligence from New York to the 18th of March, is still in favour of the Federals. Sheri- dan had effected the destruction of the railroad to Lynchburg, and was reported to be within 20 miles of Richmond. Sherman was pursuing his route, desolating the country, and burning every- thing before him. On the 12th, he was at Fay- ettville, his army in good condition, living on the produce of the country, and meeting with lit- tle opposition. The Confederate Hampton had, on the 10th inst., attacked the rear of Kilpatrick's head-quarters, and captured all his staff; he, however, re-formed his men, became the assailant, and recaptured nearly all he had lost. Hardee kept in front of Sherman, at a respectable dis- tance. Bragg, on the 10th, encountered Gen. Schofield near Kingston, and defeated him. On the llth, Schofield was reinforced, the tide of af- fairs turned, and Bragg retreated to Goldsbo- rough it was reported at New York, on the 17th inst., that Sherman was of that place. Johnston was concentrating troops at Raleigh, where it is thought the great struggle will be made. There is little news from Grant, who appeared to be waiting for the co-operation of Sherman and She- ridan.—Only one paper was published at Rich- mond, it was said, the Despatch, and that on a half sheet.—The 10th of March was observed by the Confederates, as a day of fasting, humiliation, and prayer. The Confederate Congress wn s to have adjourned on the 14th, but President Davis sent a message requesting that the adjournment be postponed to the 16th, as he had a communica- tion to make which would require deliberation and action. The message was sent on the loth. It pointed out the state of the country and called for energetic measures to procure men and sup- plies saying, that there were plenty of both to save the country. There is little of importance from Washington. President Lincoln had been ill, but was recovered. All non-resident foreign- ers, who had violated the blockade were ordered t,o quit the States in 12 days aliens or citizens who had in anv way assisted the Confederates, were to be held as prisoners till the close of the war. M. Bigelow has been appointed ambassador to France. It was stated at New York, 011 the 18th, that a freshet had occurred on the Susque- hanna river, sweeping away houses, bridges, and railways nearly overwhelmning Harrisburg and Oil City. and doingdamage to the amount of some millions of dollars. Intelligence from Central America, stated that the troops at Spanish Town had been ordered to Honduras it being reported that the Emperor Maximilian intended to annex that country.— Chili and Peru were quiet.—Columbia had de- clared war against Equador. On the 26th of February, the Emperor Maxi- milian issued a decree, announcing that lie would protect the Roman Catholic Church as the State religion but would tolerate all other creeds not opposed to morality and civilisation. Another de- cree confirms all former sales of Church property, which createdgreat excitement amongst the church party. The ministers of war and finance had re- signed. It was reported, that a Juarez chief, Echeagarey Garcia, had given in his adhesion to the Empire. Marshal Bazaine had returned to to the capital and 1VI. Bonnefois, the French in- spector of finance, bad arrived. The Overland mail has brought papers to the 28th of February. But for the "little" war with Bhootan, we could say that perfect tranquillity prevailed in our Indian possessions. The nature of the country, so difficult for troops to traverse, makes it likely that the Bhooteas will give us some trouble but an additional force has been ordered to the frontier, and we have no doubt that their irritating neighbours will speedily re- ceive meet chastisement; though the news now brought is, that the troops had been compelled to retire from Dewangeri and the Dooars. In China, the Mahomedan rebellion in the pro- vince of Hoonan, was raging. The Taepings still held Changchow, and their leader had issued an address to the people, ordering them to sub- mit to his authority. There is nothing important from Japan.

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