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TO THE ELECTORS OF THE CARNARVONSHIRE…

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jflmpevwl hïrïÜïuiiut. HOUSE OF LORDS-THOKSDAV. Tho business transacted was of a formal character. The Clerks of the Peace Removal Bill, the Greek Loau Bill, and the Pilotage Confirmation Bill, were read a third time and passed. HOUSE OF COMMONS.—THURSDAY. The debate on Mr. Disraeli s motion was resumed by Mr. LA YARD, Under-Secretary for Foreign Affairs, who complained that the Opposition had, in order to strengthen their case, unscrupulously garbled and falsi- fied extracts from the diplomatic correspondence, and that they had mainly directed their attack against Earl Russell instead of against the Cabinet, each member of which was equally responsible with the noble earl for the policy which had been pursued. He denied that Earl Kussell had threatened the German Powers and given injudicious advice to Denmark. On the contrary, the noble earl had simply warned the Germans that their policy could prove disastrous to themselves; and if Denmark had followed the advice given to her she would not have been in her present unfavourable posi- tion. Mr. HARDY indignantly repelled the charge that the Opposition had garbled extracts from the diplomatic correspondence, and he characterised the statements ot Mr. I.,tyard as calumnious. Mr. LAYARD moved that Mr. Hardy's words be taken down, but the Speaker ruled that they were not out of order. A noisy discussion followed, Lord Palmerston and the Chancellor of the Exchequer contending that Mr. Hardy's words were unparliamentary, while Sir. J. Pa- kington and Mr. D. Osborne supported the decision of the Speaker. Mr. LAYAIID ultimately expressed regret that he had used expressions offensive to the Opposition, and Mr. HARDY proceeded with his speech. He dealt particularly with Mr, Horsman's charge that tha Con- servative party had neglected its duty by not having criticised the foreign policy of the Government before the Danish question reached a crisis. The hon. gentle- man reminded the house that the Government had in- variably declined to produce the official correspondence on the subject while negotiations were pending, and that Lord Palmerston had repeatedlyxasked honourable members to refrain from discussing tne question during the sitting of the Conference. Mr. G. P. BKNTISCK alluded to a report that a compact had been entered into by certain leaders of the Opposi- tion and the Roman Catholic members, whereby the latter were pledged to support Mr. Di8raeli's motion. He strongly condemned such an arrangement, and de- clared that if the report was true, he would vote for the Government. Mr. COGAN asserted that the report was untrue, and called upon Mr. Bentinck to state upon. what au- thority he had repeated it in the house. Mr. Bentinck appears to have taken no notice of the challenge, as Mr. Cogan was followed by Mr. PEACOCK, who supported the motion. The ATTORNEY-GESKRAI., in apologising the motion, said that the Government had never given to tho Danes a promise to go to war on their behalf in fact, tlie offi- cial correspondence showed that the Danish Government had complained because her Majesty's ministers refused to give such a promise. The hon. gentleman contended that if the Government had erred in refusing to go to war on behalf of Denmark, it was the duty of the Oppo- sition to say so. Lord J MANNERS supported the motion. On the motion of Mr. OSBORNE, the debate was ad- journed until Friday evening, it being understood that it will then close and the division take place.

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