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ON A MOVINC GLAGIER. 4 I

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ON A MOVINC GLAGIER. 4 A TERRIBLE YEAR. BRAVE EXPLORER'S PERILS IN THE ANTARCTIC. 17 DAYS' BUZZARD. Reuter's Agency has secured an ac- eount of the remarkable experiences of Mr. Frank Wild and seven companions, all under thirty years of age, who, form- ing the second base of Dr. Mawson's Antarctic expedition., with characteris- tic pluck elected to be hwidecil on a mov- ing Antarctic giacier rather than return to Australia. A year later they were rescued with great difficulty, in circum- stances already narrated, by Captain Davis, of the Aurora. The chief result of their exploration wag the discovery ¡ of a great tract of land, with 350 miles j' or coast line, probabiy extending to the Pole itself, whidi has been named Queen Mary's Land. Mr. Wikils Story. I Speaking to Mentor's representative of his experiences, Mr. Wild said: We left Mawson at his base in Adelie Land on January 19 of last year with orders to form a second base on Sabrina Land or Knox Land. The former we soon ascertained did not. exist, and impenetrable pack prevented us from getting within sixty miles of Knox Land, with the result that in- stead of two miles we cruised for 1,300 miles and still found no chance of land- ing. On February 11th we sighted a glacier, which had probably been mis- taken by Wilkas for Termination Land, and on the loth found a landing. This being Shackleton's birthday, we named j it Stitickif-tttj 'jJ&cior. it locked an Illl- j '-I ,i-ii ini- i; possible spot. It was clearly a moving glacier, and its terrible cliffs a hundred reet high were badly broken and ere- vassed. Took the Risk. j .I- ? -1 1 1 ruiiy realised the possibility ot it breaking away, but thought the Tlsk worth taking. However, 1 asked all j my people separately if they were will- ing to land, and trusting in my judg- meet they cheerfully consented. We had thought of landing on a fast floe five or six years old, which we had seen some days previously, but for- tunately did not, or we should have all been lost. Landing out hut, stores, etc., and hoisting them up this danger- ous cliff was a long and difficult busi- ness, and our next care was to move them from the broken edge to a spot 640 yards distant, where we erected our hut. "During these operations the whole party worked fourteen hours a dav, and six days after the Aurora had de- parted we were able to leave our tenta and occupy the hut. During this period the temperature varied 40 degrees, dropping as low as minus 15 Fah. All the sea ice blew away, leaving us with a perpendicular glacier edge up which it was impossible for penguins or seals to reach, and for five montiu we had to depend entirely on tinned foods. Forced to Turn Back. I "Woe soon round it impossible to go on, and turned back for home. Carry- ing only 50 pounds per man the gomg was so hard that we only covored a in do and a quarter in eight hours, down -hill and sinking three feet III anew. When two miles Lom our hut another bi.zzard held us up; one tent co.iapsed, and its three occupants were unable to move or get food for 36 hours. The winter was very bad, with con- stant gales, but we managed to kee~) well and cheerful. We had a regular routine, meals at stated houis, work in morning, and afternoon off, and we amused ourselves with hockey, football, and ski:ng in line weather, ana chess, draughts and cards when unable to venture out. Every Sunday I con- ducted divine service in the morning. and we did nothing except essential camp work. In August we again made preparations for sleciguig, one party oi three going eastward and another to the west. Blizzards were very severe, one exceptionally bad one spilt a tent an?l ca!is,?( i tli<l and caused the others t-o collapse. A'ful Avalanches. I "We w v.. iftus without shelter in a hundred miles an hour wind. For five da.ys we lay in a covered hole 12ft. by bit. by 3ft. At intervals awful ava- lanches crashed down from a 600ft. cliff four hundred yards from us, while giant boulders of ice, weighing 20 tons, cam? to within a hundred yards of our hole, which three months later was itself en- gulfed. The ice we met with on the expedi- tion was far the worst I have ever seen. I Asked for hit; worst experience, Mr. Wild said: "On the whole, we enjoyed good health, and there were no casual- ties. Falling down crevices was more or less common, and we all got grazed and bruised, while on one occasion Wat- son was d-own a crevasse for twenty: minutes before we hauled him out. Our worst experience was in October, when the western party was laid up tor 17 days in a blizzard, the longest on record. Personally, 1 had never before expert-: one of mere than nine U iS j difficult to imagine what it meant for three men to be imprisoned in a tent six toot across, which gradually got smaiicr j wit1- the snow piled-up outside. There wus lD room to lie straight, nothing to lead, and for 17 days mid inputs', never under any pretext, Iiaxne: went outside. Sixteen; xirs out iff the t'\e.:cy -iour wa j ?ent in sleep. At the end of the bli- ;;?rd we were as we?k a? kittens, but it is extraordinary how soon one picks up. have known of cases where a man will gah: five or six pounds in weigh* after oae znoal.

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