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ion and the State. I

England and Burmah.I

; ^eat Fire at Galveston.

r:REE TRADE IN AMERICA.

[No title]

,-"-'""-,,--"-""--I Mr Gladstone…

THE KENTISH EAGLE SHOT.

THE PRISONER STEAD.

END OF THE CHAINMAKERS' I-…

-A COTTON MILL DESTROYED BY…

IRIEL'S EXECUTION.I

-FIGHT AMONG SOLDIERS AT SHORNCLIFFE.

FATAL ACCIDENTS WITH FIREARMS.

SINGULAR ADVENTURE OF A If…

CAPTURE OF A GANG OF BURGLARS.

.--THE COWBRIDGE I - MURDER.…

The Netherby Hall Burglary.

Robbery at Cardiff.!

-_-_-.I DEATH OF THE HON.…

-ALLEGED ARSON.

MELANCHOLY REVOLVER N FATALITY.

SHOCKING INHUMANITY TO -:CHILDREN.I

A SHOEMAKER'S DIVORCE SUIT.-

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I TO-DAY'S POLICE. I

A LADY AUCTIONEER IN TROUBLE.

THE DEATH OF DR. W. B. ".,i…

-A STRANGE CHARGE OF ASSAULT.

ICARDiFF.

[No title]

IRacing Anticipations. I

Liverpool Autumn Meeting.…

Morning Gallops. I

I Alexandra Park Meeting.…

SPORTING ITEMS. :

I TO-DAY'S MARKETS.

IHUNTING APPOINTMENTS. I

TO-DAY'S SHIPPING. I

Political Meetings.

ENTHUSIASTIC MEETING AT .CYMMER.

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ENTHUSIASTIC MEETING AT CYMMER. A Torchlight Procession. In the svening Mr Burt addressed a Luge meeting in the Independent Chapel, Cymmer, in support of the candidature of Mr A. J. Williams. Prior to the meeting a most enthusiastic outdoor demonstration took place, Mr Burt, M.P., Mr A. J. Yv Sir John Jones Jenkins, M.P., and others, who u.ad driven from Pontypridd, being met at the railway crossing, Britannia, by a pro- cession of torchlight bearers and a band. At this point the greatest enthusiasm prevailed, the dis- tinguished visitors being cheered to the echo, and afterwards escorted to the Independent Chapel Cymmer, the band playing God bless the Prince of Wales, and other tunes. Mr Idris Williams presided, and amongst those pre- sent at the meeting there were Mr Burt, M.P., Sir J. J. Jenkins, M.P., Mr and Mrs A. J. Williams, Mr Morgan B. Williams (Swansea). Mr and Mrs J. H. Jones, ond M* Edmund Thomas. Owing to the crowded state of the chapei, and the large number outside, the question ot holding an overflow meeting was introduced, but not further entertained. The CHAIRMAN, after some introductory re- marks, called upon Mr BURT, M.P., who moved the first resolutioa as follows — This meeting desires to express its gratitude to the Right H011. W. E. Gladstone, M.P., and his colleagues in the late Liberal Government for the franchise which we are about to exercise, and its hope and belief that he will be returned to power by an overwhelming majority, in order that he nay carry forward the Liberal programme of progress and reform. (Applause.) There were only two things, he remark, whicM would have brought him to that meeting. They were his per- sonal friendship of a very olose kind with Mr Williams, and an entire, or almost en- tire, political agreement between himself and the man whose candidature he was there to advocate. (Loud cheers.) Since he had promised to address a meeting on behalf of his friend, Mr Williams, he had received a very strong and pressing invitation from a gentleman whose friendship he had long enjoyed, and whose character he very much ad- mired, to address a meeting on his behalf. He referred to his good friend Mr Abraham—(ap- plause)—who was contesting a division in that part of the country. He was obliged to decline that invitation because he was overwhelmed with other engagements. Although Mr Abraham was a labour candidate, he (Mr Burt) had never advocated labour candidates as such. That WaI, he laid down this general principle, which he enunciated when he came forward at the request of the majority of those who were now his consti- tuents at Morpeth—that a man should be sent to the House of Commons, not because he be. longed to one class or another class—(hear, hear) —but entirely on account of his personal charac- ter, his political agreement with his constituents, and his abihty to give, either in the House of Commons or out of it, a full, emphatic, and intelligent expression of the opinions of his constituency. (Applause.) A further principle he had been compelled to act upon was this-to decline to interfertere in any constituency where there were differences of opinion among Radicals with whom he himself was in general agreeement. He thought the best thing was for those people to fight out their differences themselves. In nine cases out of ten, an outsider interfering in a constituency where there were these great differences was more likely to do harm than good. He believed that his friend, Mr Abraham, both by character and ability, and by his great and extensive knowledge of mining questions, would be an invaluable member of the House of Commons, and thert was no man whose return he would mori heartily welcome than Mr Abraham's. (Applause and cries of dissent, in the midst of which the chairman appealed for order.) He had little or nothing to say (went on Mr Burt) with regard to the gentleman who was opposing his friend Mr Williams. He did not know Mr Williams's opponent personally be had heard nothing but what was good of him, so that be was entirely adverse to dealing in mere personalities; but perhaps they would permit him to refer to a letter which only the other day he bad received from the agent of Mr Llewelyn. The agent wrote and gave him information to the effect that Mr Llewelyn was president of the Miners' Provident Society in that locality, and that he had rendered the society very generous support. All that be (Mr Burt) had to say about that was that he was very glad to hear it. (Hear, bear.) But if it was implied-he did not know whether it was-that because Mr Llewelyn occu- pied that honourable position, therefore the con stituency should vote for him, or be (Mr Burt) should speak for him, he altogether demurred to it. He admitted that the presidency of the Miners' Provident Society was in itself some recommenda- tion to Mr Llewelyn-it was one thing in his favour —but there might be hundreds of things against him—(laughter)—and the probability was, as re- garded Mr Llewelyn's political opinion, he wa. not at all in agreement with the great majority of those whose suffrages he was now seeking. Mr Williams had referred in his address to three amendments in the Mines Regulation Act. One of those was to give the miners absolute power to select whom they would to represent them on the pit bank as their check-weighmen. (uheers.) In 1872 they had the utmost difficulty in getting a clause in the Act passed. The employers wanted to limit as far as possible the choice of miners, and ultimately it was agreed that that the check-weighman must be for the time being a man employed not necessarily in the same mine but by the same firm or company. That, on the face of it, seemed somewhat fair, but they had a great number of cases in which the employers wanted to get rid of the checkweigh. man. If they had not been able to effect their end, they had given notice to the whole of the men connected with the colliery, and had imme- diately afterwards engaged them again, with the exoeptioa of the one checkweighman. (Shma4