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THE REPRESENTATION OF THE…

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THE REPRESENTATION OF THE .1 CARMARTHEN BOROUGHS. We deeply regret to announce that, owing to fllllllr reMOll. and business matters, Mi. Charles William NevlU, the respected member for the United Boroughs of Carmarthen and Llanelly, has felt compelled to resign the seat he has so worthily fllkd. His withdrawal from publio life will be a great lei. to the country, and especially to the soil stitnency that so nobly and handsomely retained him to Parliament. It will be a task of extreme difficulty to find a man to take his place, and we are exceedingly sorry that the deoislon he should have arrived at Is final. On the 19th July the hon, member wrote to the Bev. Latimer M. Jones, the vicar of Carmar- then, as the leader of the Oonseivativeparty In that town, saying, II I have been for some time oomlng to the oonelndon that It is my duty to resign my seat In Parliament. I have been kept here (at Westfs, bb rwidenos) by cares and duties which I could not neglect, and which I find are Incompatible with the due discharge of my duties to my constituents. For some months I have believed this step to be Inevitable, and I am now anxious to qUiet my sense of duty by resigning. You will be- lieve how painful this step will be to me, hot I am satisfied It must be taken, and that it it wher and more straightforward to take It at onoe." After the receipt of this letter steps were taken to secure a re-consideration of the matter at his hands J and U war pointed out that as the present session would soon close, the reasons that now gave rise to his resignation might have passed away by the time Parliament should re-assemble. A deputation also waited upon Mr, Nevlll to ask him to reoon- tider his resolve, but on the 25th July he again wrote to the vicar" You do not know with what pain and reluctanoe I have brought my mind to the oonvlotlon that It is my duty to reiign | but I see no alternative, and I cannot oonsent to hold an cffice the duties of which I oannot hope to fulfil, I am two I should not be doing right to expose the boroughs to all the evils of a six moutw contest, and I earnestly desire that nothing may prevent the issue of a writ before the end of the session. I am slueerely grateful for the support you have given me, and far tbe kind expressions of your approval of my oon- duct. I have endeavoured to act aooording to my conscience, and still believe I am right in not sub- mitting to party guidance. I regret extremely I am giving you and others so muoh trouble and In. convenience, and oan only assure you that it ooiti me more than it can you to come to the conclusion I have." Mr. Kevin will, therefore, probably In the course of a few days, apply for the stewardihip of the Ohlltem Hundreds, and the seat may very shortly be expected to be declared vacant. Mr. Nevlll has been a prominent figure in the social and polltloallUe of the united boroughs for many learn, and It is fervently hoped that his retirement from Parliament will not be followed by any withdrawal from those magisterial and local duties which he so faithfully and ably dis- charges at Llanelly. Upon the local board of health, the sanitary authority, the school board, the harbour board, and upon the bench, his services are Invaluable, and we trust that he will be ab!e ti continue these duties with the aame earnestness and Integrity of pniDcie which have distinguished all his public acts. Mr. Nevill has sat In the House of Ccmmons for only a little over two yesrs, and while generally aotlng with the Conservatives and the present Government, his motto has throughout evidently been measures not party." He went to Parliament believing that It was necessary for the legislation of the country that Ihbowd be influ- enced by men of deeply religious feeling, and an Implicit reliance upon a higher power; and there is not a pledge that he made during his candida- ture, or a promise ever given, that he has net honourably and striotly redeemed. He Will re- turned at the election of 1874 upon the dlsiolution of Parliament, and was one of the members then returned to swell the majority of the great Con- servative patty. Bis election was, perhaps, the rest signal victory the men of the constitution achieved at that memorable time. For upwards of thirty years the boroughs had been In a state of political thraldom, and had groaned under the B.dLeal yoke. At length, however, the time came for the right to assert itcelf, and Mr. Nevill generously came forward to champion the cause. His phllanthrophy, great Influence, and tolerant feelings, at once enlisted the sympathy of the constituency, and a Radical majority of 1,297 In 1868 was, In 1874, reduoed to is minority cf 173, the number by which Mr. Nevill was re- turned. Never was an election fought with more energy, dlreotness, and purpose, and never, prob ably, did the Radicals, even in Wales, sustain a more cruahbg overthrow. A Conservative member had not previously represented the borough since the return of Mr. David Lewis, of Studey, In 1835, and when Hr. Treharne, a representative of the constitutional cause, coninted the seat against Sir John Stepney In 1868. he only managed to secure 613 votes against 1,910 recorded fer his opponent. In 1874, when Sir John Stepney retired, the choloe of the Radicals fell npon his son, Mr. Oowell StepUey, who fought an excellent battle against great odds. The numbers declared at the poll wen-N 1,654; Stepney, 1,481; majorlty for Nevlll, 173. This was In February, U74, and there Is no reason whatever for believing that the Conservative strength has waned tinea that time, On the contrary, it has increased In vitality and members, and we btlleve It to be In a better position now than ever It was. The result of the pending contest, however, will prove. We have mentioned that Mr, NevUl did not adhere striotly to the trammels of party, and we may now add that on several important occasions he recorded his vote against the Govern- ment. He was U favour of the extension of the county franchise, and voled for the Burials' Bill of Mr. Osborne Morgan. Then he voted against the Government upon the question of re- dnelng the standard of education; the against them In the matter of the Endowed Sohools Bill, and be likewUe voted with the Opposition uponthe Slave OIronIar quetttoa. This is rather a long list of votes against the gtnerxlbody of his patty; but bis constituents; aad particularly those who re- turned him to Ptdtoiment, knew Mm too well, spe,, understood his principles too thoroughly not to trust him, or to question the motives by which he was actuated. 11f. Nevlll retires from Parliament as be entered It, with thueapeohlld eIIteem of the best members of both political parties, and returns again into private life with the heartiest wishes el all with wbom he has been brought Into contact, for hlshapplneis'and contentment. And now comes the question, "Who shall one. ceed Mr. Nevlll?" It is, as we have before Intl. mated, a difficult matter to decide, but, although Mr. NevilTi resignation has taken his political allies by surprise, and found them unprepared for action, we believe a candidate In behalf of "Churchand State" will be forthcoming. A con- test, It seems. however, Is Inevitable; but it will only servo onoe again to show the hollowners and v,In glory of the Badlcal pretensions. She name that has come for- ward most prominently, as yet, II that of Mr. Henry Lavalller Puxley, a gentleman who contested the county In 1868, Mr. Puxley is very popular In the locality, and peculiarly well qualified to become a member of Parliament. He Is a gentleman of high attainments, distinguished lingulitie abilities, and one of the most eloquent and persuasive speakers la the country, and U he could be Induced to bcccme a candidate, and should be returned, he would no doubt refleot credit upon the boroughs, and represent the constituency with dignity In the House of Commons, Mr. Puxley, however, will probably decline the honour, and In the event of his doingsothe most IlkelT gentlemen to be asked are Mr. 0. Mussel Lewis, of Stradey, Llanelly, and Mr. J. S. Tregon- ing, -of Isooed, Ferryside, a gentleman who has large business connections with Llanelly. The Radicals have some "six strings to their bow," and It is somewhat uncertain whloh will be chosen. The names of these gentlemen areMr. Evan Matthew Blchards, of Swansea, "the accidental member" of Cardiganshire Mr. W. B. H. Powell, of Maesgwynne, who unsuccessfully contested Carmarthenahlre In 1874; Mr. Bowen. Q.O.I Mr. B. T. Williams, Q.C., the Recorder of Carmarthen; and Mr. Arthur Stepney, who contested the borough last time with Mr. Nevlll. It is more than probable, we believe, that the choice will, if it has not already been made, rest upon Mr. B. f. Williams; and there can be no doubt that, If selected, he would fight a courageoui battle. For positive Information, however, we must abide the course of eventl

OUR LONDON LETTER.

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