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.-------RURAL LIFE. ;".....-

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; .~FARM NOTES.

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FARM NOTES. The sudden disappearance of the snow and frost was almost as disappointing to farmer* as to those engaged in skating. Farm work. owing to the mild autumn, is so far advanced that farmers could have put up with a week or two of arctic weather to pulverize the land, and to enable the work of carting manure on the land to be proceeded with. According to L an old tradition, which compares a fall of snow r in its beneficial effects on land with a coat of lime, snow actually enriches the land. The theory is that snow brings with it abundance of nitrogen from the air, which in due course, improves the fertility of the land. Rain also supplies nitrogen in a less degree, so that the farmer is amply compensated for the slight dis- comfort which is experienced during a fall of snow or rain. The benefit of a fall of snow is seen in the improved verdure, of the pastures after the thaw, and the improvement in the appearance of the autumn eown wheat after snow, is most marked. The season so far has been a favourable one, the excessive rainfall at the end of December supplying a store of moisture which is not in excess of requirements, and which will go far to counterbalance any injury which may be done by too dry a spell of weather later on. The land is too wet for stubble ploughing, and ley ploughing is not usually commenced before February. There is, however, plenty of work on the farm attending to the wants of live stock, and driving out manure when prac. ticable. On dairy farms the use of decorticated cake will compensate for the deficiency in milk, and produce richer cream, and when butter sells at 16d. per lb. this is a considera- tiorf. The thermometer is not used in the dairy as much as it ought to be. The milk, before being put through the separator, should be tested to s.üe that it is at the proper temperature or the machine will not do its work properly, and cream will come out with the separated milk. Churning is often prolonged in cold weather. because the thermometer is not used to seo that the proper temperature is attained before churning. The quality of the butter is also affected by long churnings, and too low a tem- perature of the cream. The use of the weighing machine in the barn is quite as important as the thermometer in the dairy. Food supplied to stock should be weighed, and the cost of feeding thereby as- certained. Lambing time will soon be here, and the ewes should have dry food. and rock salt placed within their reach. A little extra at. tention at this time will be rewarded by a flush of milk at lambing time, and healthy vigorous lambs. S. W. DAWKINS. January 9, 1909.

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FARMING IN 1908.

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FAIRS AND MARKETS. I

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.-------RURAL LIFE. ;".....-