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.-------RURAL LIFE. ;".....-

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; .~FARM NOTES.

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FARMING IN 1908.

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FAIRS AND MARKETS. I

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.-------RURAL LIFE. ;".....-

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mixed in the soft food. If soft-shelled eggs con- tinue after these necessaries have been supplied to the hens. special treatment- is necessary. The trouble may be due to over-fatted condition of the ovaries. The food in that case should be re- duced, and Glauber -Its added to the drinking water. If inflammation of the ovarium is be- lieved to be the cause, pilk should be given daily made of one grain of calomel and one- twelfth of a grain of tartar Gmetic. It is im- portant that the shells of eggs intended for incu- bation .:hali bo strong, especially when the eggs have ro stand the hen's twenty-one days' pres- sure, and it may bring fatal results to the whole set if one i. bro!:cu. IN THE APIARY. Some ago I mentioned the need of pro- ■TKli.'ig food for the bees during winter. Syrup is the food substitute given by bee-keepers, but liquid food must not be given while cold weather confines bees to their hives. The only safe food now and for the next three months is soft candy, which should be made or bought ar.d placed direct upon the top bars of the brood frame. Upon the cake of candy place a lot of warm wraps, flannel rugs, or chaff cushions- anything of a woolly nature that is a bad con- ductor of heat, and, therefore, according to ordinary notions, a warm covering. Breeding will commence again in strong colonies in a few weeks' time, and will proceed slowly until the queens are in full lay, which will be when the weather is warm and the bees are revelling in the multitude of opening flower-buds. The at- tention during early breeding is simply to see that the supply of food is kept up, and, if neces- sary, to give artificial pollen in the shape of pea- flour. Bees must have a food composed of honey and pollen when working and feeding grubs. If the latter is scarce, the best substi- tute, says "Expert" in the Agricultural Gazette, is pea-flour, which can be given near the hive, or mixed with the candy cake. PARAFFIX FOR INSECT DESTRUCTION. Though often it is used carelessly, when dam- age not good is a result, paraffin by proper ap- plication may be a most reliable insecticide. For plants under glass the following preparation is Tecommcndd Two ounces of iron sulphate, dissolved in six pints of water; one ounce of quicklime, slaked and made into milk, and then strained; sixteen liquid ounces of paraffin and six ounces of potassium sulphide dissolved in nine gallons of water; the whole to be well stirred. This mixture may be used as a fungi- cide as well as an insecticide, and it should be applied in the form of spray. One of the best of the emulsions for general use with trees and shrubs of all kinds both during winter and spring is that known as the Woburn wash, to which Reference has more than once been made in thisf/fcolumn. It is prepared by dissolving one and a-half pound of copper sulphate in eight gallons of water in a wooden pail, adding to it half a pound of fresh lime; this should be pre- viously slaked and made into a milk with water. running it in through a piece of sacking so as to eliminate grits; the mixture is then churned with five pints of paraffin, two pounds of caustic soda are added, and the whole made up to ten gallon^ All correspondence affecting this column should be addressed to A Son of the Soil," care of tha Editor of this journal. -0