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MUNICIPAL WORK AT PEMBROKE…

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PEMBROKE DOCK WINDOW SMASHING.

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PEMBROKE DOCK WINDOW SMASHING. Case before the Quarter Sessions. Curious Contretemps. PRISONER'S AFFECTING PLEA. T1"(' case ix which a young gunner of the R.G.A., at Pembroke Dock, was charged with J sma.;?hing a plate glass window ar that town, on December 28 di—fully reported in our las: issue—had a somewhat remarkable conclusion at the Pembrokeshire Quarter Sessions, on Tuesday, when prisoner came up for tiial be fore Mr. Abel Thomas, K.C., M.P., chairman, and other magistrates. The learned chairman had alluded, in charging the Grand Jury, to the necessity of the prosecution proving that the value of the broken window exceeded £ 5. The Grand Jury returned a "true bill," and when the case was heard this point ar.ose, and the Chairman said no direct evidence -is M value had been given. The manager of the shop was recalled, but was unable to say anvthng from personal knowledge, and the prosecution were not in a position to carry the case any further. The Chairman hesitated for a moment as to whether he should decide there was no case. or allow the matter to go to the jury for deci- sion. Prisoner's fate, as it were, hung in the balance, and curiously enough it was decided by prisoner himself. The Chairman had just remarked that he thought he would allow the case to go to the jury, and was about to give his summing up when the Clerk of the Peace reminded the Court that prisoner had not yet been called upon for his defence. This omis- sion was rectified, and prisoner handed in a written statement, which the Chairman read. It was a frank admission of his guilt, and a plea for another chance. The Court were evi- dently very favourably impressed, and at the conclusion of the statement the Chairman con- sulted his colleagues, withdrew the case, and discharged the prisoner. THE EVIDENCE. Peter Wilson, aged 21, a gunner in the Royal Garison Artillery, station at Pembroke Dock, was charged with breiking a plate glass win- dow, value over iP-5, the property of Arthur Li. Williams, trading as Moore and Co., chemists, Pembroke Dock, on December 28th. Mr. Mirlav Samson (instructed by Mr. Jones- Lloyd) conducted the prosecution. Henry Harries, assistant at Mr. Williams' shop, said the prisoner entered the shop at about 9 p.m. on the day in question, and took up a box of pomade from the counter, and proceeded to walk out. Prisoner refused to put the box back, and witness succeeded in getting it from him after a struggle. He ejected him from the shop, and shut the door, but prisoner struck at the glass panel of the door with his cane, and broke it. Witness then went out through a side door and gave information to the police. James M. Thomas, manager of the shop, corroborated thy statements of the previous witness, and said that when prisoner struck the panel he shouted, I'll have him when he comes out." Supt. Thomas, stationed at Pembroke Dock, said on receiving information from Mr. Harries he found prisoner outside the shop in Com- mercial Row. With assistance he took him into custody, and when charged he said "I don't know what made me do it." By the Chairman: The prisoner was strongly under the influence of drink, but was not drunk. He could walk. The Chairman: But some men can walk straight when their minds are drunk. Supt. Thomas: Prisoner was not in that con- dition. The Chairman: He was what you call fuddled ?" Supt. Thomas: Yes, sir. This closed the case for the presecution. THE QUESTION OF VALUE. The Chairman (to Mr. Samson): It is essen- tial you should prove the damage was greater than R5. I do not think there is any evidence of that. Mr. Samson: You held that the question I put to the witness was not relevant. The Chairman: You put to him "What was the value?" If he had answered there and then that might have been something. What he said was The paperhanger or glazier told me." That was not evidence. Mr. Samson: I should perhaps be entitled to ask him what, in his opinion, is the value ? Chairman I agree. You are entitled to re- call him, and it will be for the jury to con- sider what value they put upon that. Mr. Samson: There is, of course, some evi- dence in the kind of glass that was broken. (Portions of the broken glass had been pro: duced in court). Chairman: I don't know whether there are any gentlemen of the jury who know anything about the value. Probably they Know a great deal more than I do. You must ask him Have you any opinion except what the glazier told you?" Mr. Thomas, the shop manager, was then recalled. Mr. Samson: Apart from what you were told by the glazier are you able to say yourself at all what is the value of this glass? What, in your opinion, will it cost to replace it? Witness: I cannot tell exactly myself. But I know it is over L5. The glazier said it would cost £9 10s. Chairman: That is not evidence. Mr. Samson: Can you tell me approximately from your own knowledge what it would cost. The witness said he could not. Chairman: You are a chemist. Is there any- thing you know of the value of this glass apart from what you have been told? Witness: No. I cannot answer that. There was an estimate. Chairman: You must not tell us anything about that. Mr. Samson intimated that he could not carry the case any further. The Chairman: I think, perhaps, I had better allow it to go to the jury. The learned Chairman was about to address the jury, when the Clerk of the Peace inter- posed, and prisoner was asked if he had any- thing to say. PRISONER PLEADS FOR MERCY. Prisoner handed in a written statement, which the Chairman read. In this Wilson ex- pressed sorrow for what he had done, and said he was willing to forfeit his pay every week in order to pay off the damage. He was very drunk at the time, having been with a man, who said he came from Sheffield, and asked him to have a drink. Afterwards he made his way to the Barracks as he thought, and the next thing that happened he was being taken to the police station by an Inspector and policeman, who told him he had broken a window. He could not think what made him

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I PEMBROKE DOCK ODD FELLOWS.

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O TERRIFIED RAILWAY PASSENGERS.

MUNICIPAL WORK AT PEMBROKE…