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MUNICIPAL WORK AT PEMBROKE…

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PEMBROKE DOCK WINDOW SMASHING.

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I PEMBROKE DOCK ODD FELLOWS.

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O TERRIFIED RAILWAY PASSENGERS.

MUNICIPAL WORK AT PEMBROKE…

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proposed that the collector should collect some 500 accounts for about Z4, and make a couple of visits to each, whilst they would take away all the plums. Mr. Rooinson said that the collector received the money when he collected the rates, and it cost him nothing. He did not have to make a separate journey for each. Mr. Lawrence said that the collector had to make extra journeys. Mr. Robinson said that the Council had to send a man to take the readings of the meters. The collector simply made out a bill, gave a report, and took the cash. He could do the lot himself in half a day. A warm discussion followed, and Aid. Phil- lips declared emphatically that after the reve- lation they had heard that 'afternoon, they ought to uphold the hands of the Chairman of the Water Committee. Mr. Robinson complained that very little in- formation had been given him about the water, and a lot had been hidden from him. But it would come out in time. It appeared that the readings of the meter were taken by the plumber and they were not submitted to Mr. Robinson. The Mayor suggested that the plumber should in future make two reports, one to the collector and the other to the Chairman of the Com- mittee. After some further discussion the resolution that the water meter accounts be paid direct to the Town Clerk in future was carried. PURIFYING THE TOWN. The Sanitary Inspector (Mr. P. Morgan), made a report in which he gave the names of some 40 owners and occupiers in Pembroke-street, Victoria-road, Princes-street, Laws-street, and Gwyther Street, whose property was not pro- perly drained. He asked the Council to au- thorise him to serve notices upon these persons to connect with forthwith. The name of Aid. Hutchings appeared in the report as owner of some of the premises com- plained of, and the Alderman immediately- jumped upon his feet and excitedly said that he did not know any nuisance had existed upon his premises, as he had erected a new closet only eighteen months ago. Aid. Phillips asked if there was a nuisance in each case? Aid. Hutchings said that he hoped this re- port had not been brought up to provide a job for someone. What was the object of it ail ? How was it the Inspector suddenly found out all these houses had a nuisance. He said it was done to provide a job for someone. These nuisances could not have al! broken out in a week or two. Thev must have existed before. The Inspector said that there was a nuisance I at each of these places. There was no provision at all for slop water at. any of the houses men- tioned in Lawsstreet and Gwyther-street. This was not the first batch he had reported to the Council. About six months ago he reported a number of houses in King-street and Clar- ence-street. As Sanitary Inspector he consid- ered it his duty to bring the matter before the Council. He might say that the lane at the back of Gwyther-street and Laws-street was a disgrace, because the people would throw slop water there. With regard to the suggestion of making work for anyone, he had no idea of doing anything of the sort. The only person he was making work for was nimself. He had now made the report, and the responsibility had fallen from his shoulders. Ald. Hutchings said that these nuisances I must have been going on for years, and it was strange they should now all be brought on at once. He suggested that if there were nui- sances, notice should be served on the owners to abate them, and they should not be asked to spend all this money. The Mayor thought that they ought to sup- port the Inspector. He had made a clean sweep, and if he had fixed on one or two cases he would probably have given offence. Aid. Hutchings asked if the list prepared by the Inspector covered the whole town, and the Inspector said that he had visited certain streets because he considered they needed deal- ing with first. It was impossible to cover the whole of the town in a week, or in a month, and he should report on the other portions of the town later. The Mayor said they were entitled to call upon every one of the owners which had been mentioned to connect. Mr. Grieve having referred to the great nui- cance caused by the throwing of slop water in the lane between Gwyther Street and Laws Street, the inspector to serve the necessary notices to connect. LLANREATH LIGHTING. A petition was read from a number of the inhabitants of Llanreath asking that the public lighting be extended to Llanreath. The Town Clerk reported that 40 of the in- habitants were in favour of having the lamps, five were against it, and ten were indifferent. Mr. Owen thought that they should have the gas, and upon the propooition of Ald. Phillips it was decided to accede to the request. The Town Clerk: You declare Llanreath a district for lighting purposes. Aid. Jones: They objected when we wanted to once before. J The Clerk: Yes, on the ground of cost. I