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NEYLAND COUNCIL !M FORM AGAIN,…

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NEYLAND COUNCIL !M FORM AGAIN, Mr. Roach on the War-Path. REMARKABLE RHETORIC. A meeting of The cyL:nd Urban District Couacil was held on Monday evening, wheu there were present: Mr. Oliver GL!,rrett (chair- man), Messrs. F. Hitjhings, D. Harr.s, J. Jamps. W. Evan: T. Jolin, G. Roach. \V. Davien, W. l1wilLüll, J. UlaHs. J. Skone. and G. M. Vuyle, with the C'L'rk (Mr. J. GnUiths), and the Surveyor and Inspector (Mr. T. W. Evans). At the outset the Chairman wished all mem- bers a happy and prosperous New Year. (Hear, hear). Mr. Evans: I hope ''we will get off like thi;. I propose, Mr. Chairman, you stand us a claret and lemonade. (Laughter). BEACH ROAD. Mr. W. Evans said ttiat at the last meeting it was decided to write to the local members of Parliament with respect to Beach Head. He understood that Mr. Owen Philipps was now in the county, and would visit Neyland on Satur- day, and he suggested that a deputation from the \\orks Committee should endeavour to in- terview him on the matter. More could be said in five minutes than could be written iu a week The Chairman said T'llat a letter had been re- ceived from Mr. 0\ven Philipps on the matter. A letter /tvas read from the member, and another from the Army Council stating that the matter should receive attention. Another letter was read from lr. Owen Philipps stating that lie had received a letter from Mr. Haldane stating that. he would look into the matter. It was proposed by Mr. Evans, that the Sur- veyor. Clerk, and Chairman be appointed a deputation to interview Mr. Owen Philipps upon the matter. THE SAME OLD YARN. The Clerk reported that he had written to the Chief Constable with reference to the policing of Neyland. He had received a reply that the matter would receive the Chief Constable's consideration. Mr. W. Evans: The same <?ld yarn. (Laugh- ter). REMARKABLE RHETORIC. The next business was the following notice of motion standing to the name of Mr. Roach: That a vote of censure be passed on the Surveyor for spending the ratepayers' money where he had no business to." Mr. Roach then made a somewhat remarkable speech. He said, No doubt you will think .t strange me moving this vote of censure, which very probably h.is never been done be- fore hero. But there is an obligation of the ratepayers on me for the confidence they re- posed in me, putting me here, to represent them. and do my duty without fear or favour. I say this without fear of contradiction that I have done :0 from the nrst day I came here, to the best of my abiLty. I wouid wish in all earnestness for every one of you to know I have not come here with any bad feeling. I never was like that. I always considered that the shining light in the dreary path of my life, .nd I always considered in my dreary path of life, that is my shining light. My prayer is it may shine more and more to the perfect day. (Hear, hear, and laughter). As you are aware all gentlemen the contractor that had the laying of the gas, it was in his agreement, I understood it was, to clear away the spare rubbish. With all due respect to him, he engaged a cart to go out at contract at 6d. per load, and then a man to assist and load it. contractor that had the job—a. little keen on the business no doubt—he asked the Surveyor if he had any place to put this on the road. The Surveyor, I think, very wisely said No, dump it down a.t the Common Hills." the proper place, I think, for it. I would have been very proud to congratulate on doing it, .f he had kept to his word, but he did not. The next day a man came and drove the stuff away, and told the contractor's representative the Surveyor wanted the stuff. He said I will drive it where the Surveyor wants is. and I will spread it in bargain if it need." He replied, I know nothing about that,' and the man said 'I will see the Sur- veyor.' Of course, the Surveyor has not been seen in that respect since. He was left there a little while, and I think our meeting was en November 4th, because I showed it to the chairman and another council man that night. I don't think he will deny it. It was a cart re- quired, and, of course, it cost 8s. a day, a one horse cart. and three Council men, so it ran to the tune of 18s. a day. when the contractor should have done so. There is another tiung; I consider there was a great deal too much stuff left on the top of the pipes. Two foot was not much ramming in on top, and if the stuff went over it should not be left there. It was three or four inches over this in places now, and can be seen. I am very sorry to say I v.'as informed the pipes were not two feet; there is some there less than eighteen inches down. I have no reason to doubt my infor- mant in the least. Some of this stuff was driven to the side of the road, and it is there to-day, what is left from the recent heavy rains, that have not carried it away, for by my house there is half of it gone. So there is no doubt about it, and no man that had a second idea can put mud of that sort on the road, because I don't think anyone can dis- pute it, Honeyborough Road have not had so much mud in it for 30 years. There are real ruts in the road and the lamps are put properly in the narrow grip. I went there one night myself after a heavy rain. The high place left at the posts would not let it go one way, consequently the water was pooled in the road. So I think it is time to stop all these things. I don't think members will get a better explanation, but at the time there was nobody about the place that is there to state figures and dates. When I look round I am very pleased-you must excuse me-and see you are all pretty well Christians at heart. and professing to follow the meek and lawly Jesus, and if that is so, put your light on the top of the hill that the ratepayers of Neyland may se') it, and it may be like the bread that is thrown upon the waters that may be seen after many years." Good," ejaculated the Chairman en- thusiastically, as Mr. Roach concluded his peroration, but the other councillors seemed to be having a severe mental struggle to nnd' out what it all meant. Mr. John recovered first, and said that he would second the resolution to open discussion. Mr. W. Evans did not consider it would be justice to put the resolution. Mr. Roach had not told them who his informant was, and the Council had passed a resolution to take no notice of any charges of this sort unless the name of the informant was given. Therefore he thought Mr. Roach should be compelled to state who his informant was. He thought that in justice all round they should know. He would move that a vote of censure be not passed, and Mr. Roach be asked to name Ins informant. Mr. Roach said that he did not wish to give the name, but to prove that his statement was true. he was willing to pay if it was not right. Mr.Evans: You say the person informed you the mains were laid only eighteen inches. I say you should be compelled to say who the man is. Mr. Roach: Are you here to protect the rate- payers. or defend the contractor. Mr. Evans: I am not here to answer such questions as that, but to do my duty. Mr. Roach: You don't do it. Mr. Harries said that he would second Mr. Evans' amendment. Mr. Roach: I have told you I will pay the expense. You know I can't take it way. The Chairman: Can't take what. fr. Roach: My informant. I think it is very clear. Mr. Voyle thought that very serious charges hod been made, and they ought to hear the Purveyor's version of the matter. Mr. Evans said that there was a resolution on the minutes that the name of the infor- mant must be given. He stood to that. Mr. Roach said that this was only what ne had just expected. He had brought everything there, fair and square, and .he did not run after anything. Everything he had brought there he had told someone previously. The name of his informant was Mr. John Thomas deceased. He did not think if Mr. Evans had been a gentleman, he would have forced him to men- tion the name. Mr. Evans: I like to have things fair and above board, and I don't listen to any yarn about the streets. The Surveyor then gave his version of the affair, and spoke at &ome length. He said

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NEYLAND COUNCIL !M FORM AGAIN,…