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! LADIES' LETTER I-

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LADIES' LETTER I NEW YEAR RESOLUTIONS. If all the fifty-two weeks of the 3-e:ir Ih,c;-e like th3 first one, it would be a better world than it is. It is the week when, good resoiu tions are new, and most of us have doubtless determined that 1909 shall see some iiule im- provement in our ways, some little failings put aside, and some good habits put in their place. It is only when the joy of the New Year begins to fade that the real struggle to keep these good resolutions begins.. Many, we know, are destined to be broken, but it is something gained to have set ourselves, a higher ideal of conduct which so many of us do, in the hope that we may succeed in bringing Uiese good resolutions to fruition. CHRISTMAS REVELRIES. Of course no Christmas party is complete i without its mistletoe, under which every man J is expected at this season, to do his duty, but | complaint is made that kissing under the mistletoe is fast becoming obsolete, like other J Jhristmas festivities that have been shoia off all their former gaieties in these most de- corous days. It is said that the custom was first introduced into this country by a Nether- lantl's princess, but history records that kiss- ng was never peculiar to the Dutch. At one time, kiss-in.the-ring, now relegated to village iairs, had its part in Christmas revelries, and -nat had really a foreign origin. It was in. icn.oci in France, and first became popular in tills country in the 16th century. NEW YEAR DEBUTANTES. this country in the 16th century. NEW YEAR DEBUTANTES. | Balls and dances will be numerous in the early days of the New Year, and it is quite usual for such entertainments to afford the I opportunity for the coming out" of debu- tains. Lady Salisbury is to give a large coun- try house ball at Hatfield on January 13tli, for the debut of her eldest daughter, Lady Beatrice Cecil-who is 17-tall and good looking, and I who will make her maiden bow at one of the Courts next season. Lady Derby will also take up the role of chaperon to her eldest daughter, f Lady Victoria Stanley, who will be 17 next J June. Lady Victoria has always been a I favourite in Royal circles, and will make her formal entry into society at one of the late Courts. ANOTHER AMERICAN PEERESS. The marriage of the Earl of Granard and Miss Beatrice Mills, is to take place in New York on January 14th, and that event will add I yet another to the many American peeresses settled in this country. Miss Mills is the I daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ogden Mills, who fill a leading place in New York society, and she is well-known in London, where she has ¡ appeared under the auspices of her aunt, Mrs. Whitelaw Reid. The future Lady Granard will no doubt some day inherit a share of the enor- mous wealth of her grandfather, Mr. Darius Ogden Mills, who, after being a clerk in a New York store, followed the gold rush to California in 1849, and there became a million- aire banker and financier. Lord Granard is the eighth earl, having succeeded his father in 1889. He is thirty-four years of age, and is Master of the Horse in the King's Household. ROYAL VISIT TO DORSETSHIRE. The King and Queen are to pay a visit to Lady Alington at Crichel Hall, near Wim- borne, next week. Their Majesties, when Prince and Princess of Wales, were at Criehel on more than one occasion, in the time of the late Lord Alington, and their forthcoming visit will to a certain extent take the place of the annual visit which the King and Queen used to pay to Chatsworth at the New Year, during the lifetime of the late Duke of Devonshire. Charles II. visited Crichel in 1665, and it was the residence of George IV. when Regent, but like many historic mansions, it has been burnt and rebuilt, and was greatly improved iu the J time of the late peer. Lady Alington is a popular hostess, fond of acting, and some I amateur theatricals will be given at Crichel in honour of the Royal visit. There will also be general Royal motor trips, and probable visits to Lord and Lady Wimborne at Canford, Lord and Lady Shaftesbury at St. Giles's, and Lord and Lady Portman at Bryanston Park. VIOLETS, VIOLETS, EVERYWHERE. Quite every other woman one meets has a bunch of violets tucked into the front of her coat or blouse, and though the perfume is de- lightful and the appearance perfect, it is an open secret that the majority of the bunches 1 are not of Nature's fashioning. Later we shall 1 probably turn to the spray of lilies of the I valley, a bloom by the way even the very | best artificial flower-maker experience some I difficulty in copying successfully. The Queen ) has frequently been seen lately wearing a « corsage-spray of lilies of the valley, and al- ready many fashionable women are following Her Majesty's lead in this direction. AT THE FLORISTS. There has been a tremendous run upon pink flowers for table decorations this Christ- mastide, and leading florists have experienced some difficulty in meeting the demand. Lilieis. of-the-valley, too. have been greatly sought after. And with regard to flower presents, we are following this year very closely in the foot- steps of our neighbours on the other side of the Channel. Vast numbers of baskets, many containing the most beautiful and costly blooms, have been sent out already, and more still are ordered for New Year's Day. Pots containing growing oranges have also found favour amongst present seekers, and again boughs bearing clusters or oranges together with their greenery. < THE DANGEROUS HATPIN. It will be well, if, before permittmg ourselves to mix in the scuffle of the January sales, we carefuly see to it, that the points of our hat- pins are either furnished with "guards," or well- buried in the trimming of our headgear. Numbers of more or less serious accidents- caused by the points of hatpins—have occurred during the recent rush of Christmas shopping, and it is certainly time measures were takPTI to prevent women from wearing such danger- ous hat fastenings. Just now we run more chances of coming to, or causing grief in this way, than ever before, as, during tho reign of the huge hat, we sought out the longest pins available, and now our hats are smaller we are making the same pins do, with their superfluous number of inches and the danger- ous points.

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