Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

17 articles on this Page

[No title]

Advertising

Advertising

! LADIES' LETTER I-

[No title]

!P";'Fwr11.' IESTATE MARKET…

Advertising

Elephant's Tantrums.

. Great Fire at Dewsbury.

0 Fell Into a Kiln.

Advertising

RURAL LIFE.

Advertising

AGRICULTURAL POLITICS.

Premier's Double.

RURAL LIFE.

News
Cite
Share

were, of course, pursued with the greatest thoroughness and :impartiality, and it luwt" ho admitted tlj^t t1 :-v arc rather unfavounWo to the discovery." if nothing else results, ti:3 need is most cle. riy .shown of submitting novel- ties to careful 1\ ..ll;¡atinn be?ar-.J ¡;pcaking of them as of fao!1.1'■-Jue. But pci^sibly premier attention even a ;<ior;g scientists has been drawn to th-e importance, of bacterial iufluerees upon the soil by the puKiviiy given lo j terine. In its it be ] oWit: that there still to be <ne :-at ■ tori'v tho many i«, i"=.pufai-.lo oucce. rs whi-h 3 vivo been reeordod a;l partis of the oonmrv. IJIO I'tehl, M co;iii-F-n*ing on the subject, says-: VVe wore re?on<V informed at Ko-.v that ex- periments mode 1 Lcyro proved that this prepara- tion had no effect whatever on the growth of various plants, leguminous and for which it had :Tn tried. There IKIT, of course, be somo otivr means than that devircd by Mr. Bottomley :or cn,blin" plants to utilise the enormous supply o' nitrogen tho atmospnere, but V:re c;i~\ lie !1 flonlit now that th-3 nodule-prothicing baeillus, Psoudo- mcnas radictcola. is not amenable to artificial treatment that will make it in any sense a sub- stitute for manures." CARE OF A CAXARY. A not infrequent present at this season is a cage-bird—usually a Canary—and thoi-e are few vvho would not welcome such a gift. But thoreh ih it may ooine careful direcr: ms as to its treatment, v h:oh arc obeyed, the new arrival I sometimes seems unable to settle down. His feathers and general appearance suggevf j}j. heaith. Trouble is often caused by a diet too stimulating. The best seed food is a mixture of tnree parts of canary seed and one part of sum- mer rape. About onco a week a dozen or ?o of hemp seeds, given by hand through the bars, will (he!t> to make '.ho bird tame, and will do it gcoo. G;cen food, ^uch as a spray of watereress. must be given at least three times a. week, and tae eagc ought to be cleaned out very cften. and the floor well covered with coarse, gvittv cand. A smali piceo of b'-ead (i-pf"¡ in J: i: end squeezed nearly dry. makes ovro'lcit <•].n.ro now and then. It ought to have a bat.'i three or four times a w-eek in the summer, arc! twice a week in the winter, when the water should be slightly warmed. GOOD AXD BAD BFTTF" No one cen make good butter front bfid cream, though the-■ largo amount of infevii. but- ter to be met with suggests that, wanv !n{ "nois are made. There is great skill in :I;a),< The very best, finest-flavoured buti-r but .iil nary person should b- a:>!e to make b,r- ,V'r which is sweat and wholesome. The chief cause of the enormous quantity of strong, rancid but- ter which is produced during tho summer and autumn is keeping the cream for a whole week unscalded, or improperly ecaided, at n high tem- perature, and, in many ca.-es, without being stirred. In thev circumstances rancidity takes place before tho cream is put into the churn. The chief cause of the strong, bitter, t urnipy butter produced in the winter is due to im- proper scalding of the cream and keeping it, in this case, at too loii, a temperature. As a general rule, cream should be kept, whether summer or winter, at a temperature somewhere near 55deg. It should be eealded or Pasteurised at 140deg. for twenty minutes, and ttfen imme- diately cooled. This ehould be done every day as it is obtainoo-not the week's collection just before churning, a correspondent of the Mural World advises. There ought to be a placard in every dairy with the words, "Stir the cream." Whenever cream is not scalded, churning should take place twice a week. Cream which is likely to' make good butter has a sharp, but agreeable, sour, but not rancid, emell, and its surface is like eatin. If these points were attended to a bene- fit would be conferred, not only on the butter makers themselves, but on the public as well. All oorrespondence affecting this column should be addressed to "A Son of the Soil," care of the Editor of this journal.

AGRICULTURAL POLITICS.