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CHESTER COUNTY COURT. -

HUNTING.I - -.0-

[No title]

QUOITS.

AUCTION SALES.I ■ -J*.

[No title]

VOLCANIC CATASTROPHE. I

I LIVERPOOL POLICE SCANDAL.

THE YEOMANRY CAMP. j

[No title]

WELSH INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION.…

FLINTSHIRE POLICE COMMITTEE.

[No title]

DEATH OF HON. H. HOLBROOK…

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DEATH OF HON. H. HOLBROOK I A STRIKING PERSONALITY. I It is with unfeigned regret that we to-day an- nounce the decease, at the ripe age of eighty-one years, of the Hon. Henry Holbrook, who during a strenuous life reflected lustre upon his native county of Chester. The deceased gentleman had not enjoyed the best of health for some years past, and eventually succumbed on Sunday to an attack of heart disease and dropsy. He was the son of Samuel and Elizabeth Holbrook, of Bradwall, near Sandbach, and first saw the light at North- wioh on July 11th, 1820. Having received an education at Witton Grammar School, he com- menced his business career as a merchant at Liver- pool. In 1854 ho went to the Crimea as a con- tractor, and many were the tales he used to regale his acquaintances with of the scenes he had wit- nessed during the struggle before the fall of Sebastopool. After some years' residence at Odessa, Mr. Holbrook removed to New Westmin- ster, British Columbia, where he sot up in busi- ness as a gentleman genoral-merchant. On the formation of a municipal council in that com- munity, Mr. Holbrook manifested an interest in public affairs, and was chosen as the seoond Mayor of the city. So well did he discharge the duties of the chief magistracy that he was re-elected to the honourable position on four successive occasions. Mr. Holbrook was elected to the first Legislative Council that sat in British Columbia, and was also a member of the Legislature after the union of British Columbia and Vancouver Island. He laboured strenuously in behalf of the admission of the colony into the Canadian Confederation, and when that event was finally consummated in 1871 he was appointed to the local Government as Chief Commander of Lands and Works and Presi- dent of the Executive Council. These offices he continued to fill up to the resignation of the Administration in November, 1872. Thereafter he was leader of the Opposition up to his defeat at the polls, 1875. He was for several years chairman of the Salmon Canneries Association, New West- minster, and while in that position secured from the Government a fish hatchery. Mr. Holbrook manifested the deepest interest in all that concerned British Columbia. lie was a truly loyal Canadian, and he strongly resented the merest semblance of interference on the part of the United States. For instance, during the Klondyke rush he exposed in our columns the false statements appearing in the Yankee press with regard to the condition of the mucli-talked-about region The United States, it will be remembered, unofficially offered to assist the Canadian Government in pre- serving order, but, as Mr. Holbrook was quick to point out, the Canadians wanted no support to maintain law and order. In a private letter on the subject he said the object of the United btates was to enable prospectors from California to get hold of the best claims, but he contended that if they would look after their own country it would be far better than interfering with Canada. He explained that when he was an officer of the Crown in British Columbia he had to fight against the same kind of thing. His experience was that the United States caved in when a little firmness was shewn, as was the case of the intended Fenian raid in January, 1872. When the American-Irish saw that the Government of Canada was prepared for them, they did not come over from Port Townsend but dispersed. He was a subscribing member of the National Sea Protection Association, and a member of the United Empire Trade League. London. In politics he was a Conservative, and he was a staunch Churchman. Mr. Holbrook was unmarried. For more than a score of years past the late Mr. Holbrook had resided in retirement at Talbot House, Parkgate, and was always rightly regarded as the staunch friend of the fishermen of the Deo estuary. He was more or less continuously during that period a member of the River Dee Fishery Board, and more than once he represented the interests of the Dee upon the Lancashire and Western Sea Fisheries Committee, where he stood up manfully against heavy odds in the cause of our local fishermen. His experience in Canada made him an undoubted authority upon salmon culture, and to those who were in the habit of attending the meetings of the Dee Fishery Board the name of Mr. Holbrook and the Frazer River, British Columbia, were inseparable. The stories he used to tell of the miraculous drafts of salmon experienced on the Frazer often raised an incredu- lous smile at the Board meetings, but we have every reason to believe that the conditions, so far as he represented them, were by no means exaggerated. In point of fact, upon one occasion he produced a photograph, proving his assertions up to the hilt, for a paddle steamer was actually stopped in her passage up stream by a shoal of salmon that completely clogged the paddle- floats. In the death of the late Mr. Holbrook tho Dee fishermen have indeed lost a trusted friend. For some years Mr. Holbrook had annually given a prize for competition at Witton' School for the best essay on colonial resources. The deceased will also be widely mourned among the Craft of Cheshire, for he was the oldest living Past Provincial Grand Officer of Cheshire Freemasonry, having been P.G.S of Works from 1854 to 1856. He was also the oldest Knight Templar in Lancashire. On the occasion of his eightieth birthday, the late Mr. Holbrook was presented with a solid silver salver by the members of the Dee Lodge of Freemasons (No. 1,576, Parkgate), of which he was an esteemed member. I THE FUNERAL The interment) took place at 6andbach Jrarish Church yesterday (Friday The cortege left the' residence about 9.40 for Parkgate Station. The blinds of the houses at Parkgate and throughout the district were closely drawn, and there were many sympathetic onlookers as the mournful pro- cession slowly made its way to the station. The principal mourners at Parkgate were Miss McEachan j Mis?Beynon (niece) Mrs. Kirkwood, Mr. Arthur 1, -Staiiistreet, Mr. L. Price, Mr. A. Jamieson, Mr. H. Stringer, and the following members of the Dee Lodge Mr. Samuel Lee. W.M., F. Goodwin, I.G., and J. Johnson Floral tributes were sent by Miss Beynon, Miss McEachan, Misses L. and N. Stanistreet, Miss Thomson, Mr. Lee, Miss Lydia Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. W. Gamon, Mrs. Cowan, Miss E. Kirkpatrick, Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Pugh, the Dee Lodge, Mr. and Mrs. R. L.Price. the Dee Lodge, Mr. and ?N lrs. R. L. P r:lce.

IHAWARDEN GUARDIANS. I »

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i- - - -THE VACANT REGISTRARSHIP.

TEA AND - CONCERT. I

PARKGATE.

BARROW.

BUCKLEY. - . - - - -

MOLD.

!MALPAS. -_. -

IFRODSHAM.

IHAWARDEN. J

MARKETS AISD FAIRS.I

HELSBY.

I DISTRICT -COUNCILS.

- - .- -. IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.…

ATHLETIC NEWS.

CONN AH iS QUAY.I.

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