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- ... - - AGO. j A HUNDRED…

! CHRISTMAS TREAT TO AGED…

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THE NEW CENTURY.

! CHRISTMAS TREES.

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EDDISBURY PETTY SESSIONS.I

BROXTON PETTST SESSIONS. I

MILWR MINES. I

CHESTER SIGNALMAN S DEATH.

TERRIFIC GALE. I

[No title]

THE JLATft M IS PI 1 CAIRN…

CITY POLICE COURT.

DEATH OF LORD WILLIAM BERESFORD.

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DEATH OF LORD WILLIAM BERESFORD. Lord Wm. Beresford died at Dorking on Friday night, the cause of death being heart failure. Lord William served in the Zulu War in 1879, and was present at the engagement at Ulundi, where he greatly distinguished himself. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for gallant conduct in having at great personal risk turned to assist Sergt. Fitzmaurice at the White Umvntlosi River in 1879. Lord William was an extensive patron of the turf. The entry of • Volodyovski, the Derby favourite, will not be rendered void tor that race by Lord William Beresford's death, the horse having only been leased to his lordship during his racing career. The circumstances in which Lord William Beresford won the Victoria Cross formed the sub- ject of an article in "Pearson's Magazine," en- I' titled "The Bravest Deed I Ever Saw," by Archibald Forbes, who wrote as follows: "Beresford was out on a scout, or rather an, armed reconnaissance, to ascertain the strength of the Zulu forces. Builer directed him to be very wary or he would be ambuscaded. The advice was good, for suddenly from out a deep watercourse crossing the plain and from out the adjacent long grass sprang up a long line of several thousand armed Zulus. At Bulier's loud command to fire a volley and then retire Beresford and his scouts rode back towards the main body, followed by Zulu bullets. Two men were killed on the spot. A third man's horse slipped up, and his wounded rider came to the ground, his horse running away. Beresford, riding behind his retreating party, looked back and saw that the fallen man was trying to rise into a sitting position. The Zulus were perilously close to the poor fellow, but Beresford believed he saw a chance of anticipating them. Galloping back to the wounded man and dismounting, he confronted his adversaries with his revolver while urging the fallen soldier to get on his (Beresford's) horse. The wounded man bade Beresford remount and liy. 'Why,' said he, 'should two men die when, death was inevitable but to one?' The quaint, resourceful humour of his race did not fail Beresford in this crisis; he turned on the wounded man and swore with clenched fists that he would punch his head if he did not assist in the saving of his life. This argu- ment prevailed. Still facing his foes with his revolver, Beresford partly lifted, partly hustled the man into the saddle, then scrambled up him- self and set the chestnut agoing after the other horsemen. Another moment's delay and both must have been assegaied. A comrade, the brave Sergeant O'Toole, fortunately came back, shot down Zulu after Zulu with cool courage, and then aided Beresford in keeping the wounded man in the saddle until the laager was reached, where no none could tell whether it was the rescued or the rescuer was the wounded man, so smeared was Beresford with borrowed blood. Lord William was commanded to Windsor to receive the reward 'for valour' from the hands of the Sovereign. But something more must be told. Berf'sford plainly told her Majesty that he could not in honour receive recognition of the service it had been his good fortune to perform unless that recognition were shared in by Sergeant O'Toole, who, he persisted in maintaining, de- served infinitely greater credit than any which might attach to him. Not less than soldierly valour can Queen Victoria appreciate soldierly honesty, generosity and modesty; and so the next "Gazette" announced that the proudest reward a British soldier can aspire to had been conferred on. Sergeant Edmund O'Toole, of Baker's Horse." (The above articles appeared in our last Saturday, Evening Edition.)

IAUSTRALIAN COLONIES UNITED.

TO CURE A COLD IN ONE DAY,