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RURAL LIFE.

FAIRS AND MARKETS.

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SEASONABLE TOPICS. -

- LADIES' LETTER. I-I

SOCIALIST'S MORALITY.

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jAN ACCIDENT IN THE HAYFIELD.…

HAVERFORDWEST PETTY SESSIONS

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HAVERFORDWEST PETTY SESSIONS Shire Hall, Monday.—Before T. H. Thomas (mayor), Dr. Greenish, Messrs. T. Lewis James, C. C. Saies, T. R. Dawkins, Isaiah Reynolds, and Hugh J. P. Thomas. DRUNK, ETC. John John, of Prendergast, was summoned for being drunk in Prendergast on the 4th inst. The last conviction against him was in 1902. —Fined 2s. 6d., no costs. Thomas Phillips, rag and bone collector, Quay Street, was summoned at the instance of P.S. James with drunkenness in Bridge Street on the 23rd inst. The officer persuaded him to go home, and later in the day the officer was called to the lodging-house to quell a dis- turbance defendant was making with a woman. —Fined 7s. 6d. and costs. Alice John, of Quay Street, was summoned for "simple drunkenness" in Bridge Street on the 3rd. She pleaded guilty, and a previous conviction at Pembroke last November was put in. In answer to a question defendant said she was "a Haverfordwest girl," and was born near the kilnes.—Fined 7s. 6d. inclusive. NO LIGHT. George Lewis, farmer, Churchill, was sum- moned for driving a horse and cart without a light at 5.45 p.m. on the 6th inst. on the Port- field Road.—P.C. Phillips proved the case, and the defence was that he had been unexpectedly detained in town.—Fined 2s. inclusive. CHARGE OF NEGLECT. Ann Hughes, now of Prendergast Hill, but formerly of Quay Street, and of Holloway, Haverfordwest, was summoned for unlawfully and cruelly neglecting a girl of 8 years, of whom she is guardian, to the injury of the child's health. Deputy Chief Constable James said he visited the defendant's home at Prendergast Hill on January 2nd, and there found a girl of 8 years of age, named Anna Maria Jeffreys, whom the defendant had adopted many years ago. The girl was suffering from a wound on the right ankle. Defendant was absent. The room was very dirty, and the child was poorly clothed. He went again with Dr. Williams, who exam- ined the child. He had spoken to defendant several times about having the child out very late at nights. He had since had a letter from Dr. Williams, telling him to take immediate steps to rescue the child from the neglect of the defendant. The child was now in the Infirmary. In reply to the defendant, the Deputy Chief Constable said the child was not clean, and the bedding was black. Dr. Williams said he examinedthe little girl. She was sitting in front of the fire with her leg on a stool. The ankle had a rag round it, and removing this he found a WOUL. of the nature of a discharging abscess on the ankle. The whole leg was swollen. He saw the child again on the 14th, when he found the leg was contracting upwards, and as he feared further deformity of the leg, he advised her removal to the Infirmary, which was done. At the Infir- mary she was weighed, and was three stones and three lbs in weight, with a height approxi- mately of 3ft Hi or four feet. The normal weight of a child of her age was three stones lOlbs, and height, 3ft 10ins. The child was pale, ill, and badly nourished. James Rees, school attendance officer, said he had reported the defendant for neglect. It was stated that the child was adopted by defendant's husband when only a fortnight old, and the defendant said she was paid 3s. 6d. per week. It was the, child of Florence Helena Jeffreys, who had since married a man named Laugharne. ? Defendant asked what would be done with the child. Would ehe come back to her? ( The Deputy Chief Constable said when the child was fit to be discharged from the Infir- mary. he should apply to the Guardians to adopt her, as the defendant was not fit to have the care of her. The Mayor said they found the defendant guilty of neglect, and she would have to come up for sentence in three months time. The Clerk, addressing the defendant, advised her to keep away from the child. If she did that and gave no trouble the sentence would be light, but if she interfered it might be heavy. Defendant: Can't I see the child? The Clerk: You had better keep away.

TENBY HUNT MEETING.

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