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-------RURAL LIFE.

FAIRS AND MARKETS.

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LADIES' LETTER.

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LADIES' LETTER. MARRIAGE CUSTOMS. Banns of marriage, which some of the clergy refuse to publish for those who wish to marry their deceased's wife's sister, were in olden times announced in the market place of the towns on three successive market days. Banns were first intrced into the Church of Eng- land about the year 1200. but for hundreds of years afterwards the announcement in the market-place was held to be sufficient. It was not until the middle of the eighteenth century that the forms of legal marriage in England were clearly defined, one of which was the ceremony in church after banns, on three successive Sundays during the celebra- tion of public worship. Marriage by banns dates back to still more ancient times in France, and has undergone little change. Some of the marriage customs still retained had their origin before the Christian era, when it was the general practice to capture the bride by force. Sometimes this violence was assumed and sometimes real, and the cus- tom of throwing old slippers after departing wedding couples is a memory of the times when more formidable missiles were hurled at the pair by the bride's relatives and -friends. MARRIED WOMEN AND THE FAMILY FINANCES. One would scarcely expect to find a Turkish gentleman comparing this country unfavour- ably with his own as regards feminine inde- pendence. It is commonly supposed that the position of the Oriental woman is one of utter subjection; but it seems that this is not so in Turkey, at least in respect of the division and control of the family finances, which to a far greater extent than is the case in this country makes the Turkish wife independent of her husband. There is in all cases some kind of marriage, settlement, in which the prospective husband states the sum he is to allow his wife for her own personal requirements and the up- keep of the home, and if he has means he is obliged to endow her at marriage with a sep- arate estate, which becomes hers absolutely. The Turkish woman is, as a rule, conse- I I quently economically independent of her hus- band; but in this country, where marriage settlements are seldom entered into except by the wealthy classes, the law makes the married woman simply her husband's housekeeper.% It has been decided that if she saves from the housekeeping allowance without her husband's consent, the money is not hers, but his, and it has been suggested that in such circumstances she could even be criminally prosecuted for fraud. THE MONTH OF EVIL REPUTE. That some of the diseases we know are only old ones under new names, is confirmed by a record in the "British Chronologist," which, referring to the year 1733, said that "People were afflicted this month with a headache and fever, which very few escaped, and many died of, particularly between the 23rd and 30th of January, when there died upwards of fifteen hundred people in London and Westminster." That was surely our familiar enemy the in- fluenza, which, fortunately for us, has been so far this winter a little less active than usual. Our ancestors always regarded January as the worst month of the year, although most of the old proverbs speak well rather than ill ef the cold which is generally characteristic of the month. Thus we are told that, "If January calends be summerly gay, 'twill be winterly weather till the calends of May." THE LATEST IN SASHES. To a few exceptionally tall and graceful individuals this very up-to-date form of drapery may possibly prove becoming, but the general- ity of women will do well to keep the old- world way of wearing gashes, or leave them alone. The new sash, so far usually of soft, sinuous satin, passes over the bust and crosses at the back, where, well above the waist line, the ends are drawn through a buckle. These ends are next brought forward over the hips and knotted below the knees. A show-room assistant, with her superb figure and graceful deportment, might "carry off" such a mode successfully; so also might a well-trained ac- tress; but to the rest of womenkind it can only prove a delusion and a snare. A WELCOME CHANGE. Whether it 's owing to the epidemic of cheap fur capes, collars, and muffs, hung all over with "-iiade-up" tails and horrid little heads, or not, the facA remains that the majority of well-dressed women are now favouring mall neat boas and muffs, minus even tails. With regard to the former, just a moderately wide band of some costly fur, such as sable, chin- chilla, or ermine, is being worn, lined with the softest satin. This band closely encircle* the neck, and is finished off at one side with a fairly large low of black satin ribbon, the note of black being repeated in the hat or toque.

Connoisseur of Pills.

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lALL KIGHTB ZIESBBVRO.J

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WEATHER CHANGES.

MOTOR OMNIBUSES.

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