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-------RURAL LIFE.

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RURAL LIFE. BY A SON OF THE SOIL. AN AUTOMATIC DRINKING THOUGH. That the success and prolits of a farm depend to a great extent on the attention which is glvea to the feeding of the live-stock cannot be dis- puted, and every farmer of intelligence will agree, that one of the most important means by which the best results can be obtained is the provision of a satisfactory system for the con- stant and adequate supply of drinking water. Only in this way can the stock be mad* thoroughly profitable, whether they are fatten- ing, milking, or working animals. A constant supply of clean, evenly-tempered water conduces not only to a more ready consumption of food, but to an increase and better quality of the milk yield. On every weii-managed and up-tc-dat« farm various scientific methods are employed for the profitable rearing of the stock; but often the AIT AUTOMATIC DBINKING-TROUGH. j 1 all-important matter of a proper water supply is overlooked, or an out-of-date and inadequate system io adopted. Consequently, although the food may be good, the animals do not thrive, and become subject to diseases, from which they would be free if the sanitation cf the mangers received due consideration. In the majority of cases, diseases are to be attributed to bad and impracticable mangers, and to rotting remains of fodder left in them. These rotting fodder re- mains in impracticable mangers are the breed- ing-places of all bacteria and fungous growths, as well as for the moet part, the root of all evils. The adoption of such a system as that illustrated meets all requirements and remedies till evils, and I shall be pleased to send further detail* to all inquirers. A FINE DOUBLI DAISY. Seedsmen are now sending out their catalogues, broadcast, and very interesting reading some ef them make; while it is also evident, judged by the number of novelties, that this year is to be a memorable one in floriculture. One of the earliest trade IIste to reach me is that issued by Messrs. Daniels Brothers, Limited (Norwich), and they are anxious that it should be known that the whole of the matter has been re- arranged, many new ilustrations inserted, and, what ia more important than anything else, the cultural directions have been brought up-to-date. The many novelties which the enterprising East Anglian florists are introducing can be men- uoued later in the season, but, as I have had an 'A FINE DOUBLE DAISY. I inquiry for a really good double Daisy, I give an illustration of one of the best of those which are included in the catalogue before me. There is no better hardy perennial plant for spring bedding, and edging, &c., they grow only about three inches high. and are exceedingly pretty when in bloom. They should be sown in March or April for blooming the same year, and in June if blooms are wanted the following 6pring. The new giant white, of which I give an illus- tration, is an especially good variety, although some growers prefer the mixed variety. TREATMENT OF LINNETS. A good seed mixture for Linnets is: Canary three pints, teazle two pinte, summer rape, char- lock, and linseed one pint each. A feed of hemp, maw, niger, and a good wild seed mixture can be given frequently (varied) by way of a change. Let them have a little groenfood, especially rape seedlings in the winter, and ripe seeding, shep- herd's purse, chickweed, plantain, and groundsel freely in the summer. When newly caught, cracked hemp (freeh made each day) and maw seed should be freely given, with pome niger as well likewise a pan of soaked rape (dabbed as dry as possible in a cloth) should also be pro- vided. Many good makers put up a special Lin- net (or Finch) mixture in packets, and a feed of this occasionally makefl an acceptable variation from the ordinary stock mixture. A FINE Inis. With few exceptions all the varieties of the Iris .should be planted as early as possible, the bulbs of many kinds deteriorating if they are left out of the too long. Although all Iris arc worth grc/winu'. there are so many different varieties that it i« quite a difficult matter to select the Kind which are best suited to the ground one has at dispoAil. 1';h Euclish Iris IETS HJSTKIOr-FS. resemble the tropical Cattleya in form and colour; they grow about 18in. high, and have flowers varying in colour from white to lilac, purple, violet, and striped. The variety of which an illustration is given oomes in this group; the small variety is pale blue, veined white, but His- triodes major has large sky-blue flowers, beauti- fully lined white Tho German or Flag Iris con- sists of large showy kinds, and can be planted any time. THE SMALL HOLDINGS ACT. The Board of Agriculture has issued a circular to county councils and county boroughs on the subject of the Small Holdings and Allotments Act, which came into force on New Year's Day. The Board wishes to know what action been taken or is proposed to be taken for that pur- pose, either by the issue of handbills calling attention to the Act and the insertion of adver- tisements in the local newspapers inviting appli- cations, by inquiries through the parish councils and other allotment authorities, or by any other means. The Board requires to know the number of applications for land which have been re- ceived by each council and the total quantity of Land applied for. On receipt of anv applications for land for small holdings a council should, tho Board points out, endeavour to satisfy itself as to the qualifications and suitability of the appli- cants, either by personal inquiries by members of the council or by persons authorised by them, or by the issue of a form setting out the points on which the council desire information. The Board thinks that as a general rule inquiries ahould be. undertaken by means of personal inter- views with the applicants, and that 6ub-oommit- fees. consisting sertbr of members of the Small ^foldings C-)I1!J:rh1 r" :«.TS ci the minor kw.l s-utsoritivss aisi suitable per- sons, should be appelated for special pu pose for each park}) or are-, from which applications ere received. Th6 Board does not think it iH>cessary to suggest to the councils the particular points on which information might be sought, but thinks that it will, as a rule, be advisable to inquire whether the applicants desire to be supplied with a cot- tage or other buildings, as the answers to this question will necftssariiy have an important bear- ing on the question whether a council deter- mince to purchase or to hire the land nt*yw»*-» to satisfy the demand. The Board suggests that it would be very useful if information could bo obtained as to the extent of the land in the pos- session of the Ecclesiastical Commissioneris. the beneficed clergy. Universities or colleges, trus- tees of oharity lands, and other public bodies or corporations. Inquiry should be made from such owners as to whether they \o';ld be willing to let or sell land for the nu rpos.? of providing I 1!);r small holdings. The councils are also requested to furnish a list of the members and a «fateroent shewing the constitution of the Small Holdings an<l AllotmeTfts Committees appointed under the Act. The Board is of opinion that with a view of avoiding all unnecessary delav it is de- sirable that the Small Holdings Committer should be authorised to conduct all the corre- spondence relating to the Act and to carry out inquiries, &c., without €he necessity of having to refer each point to th« next quarterly meeting of the council. FARMERS AND THEIR FOWLS. Farmers do not shine as bricht light in the poultry world, writes J. A. H. in the Mark Lane Express. This plain fact stares everyone in the face. Among the various denizens of the farm- yard the fowl receives the least consideration, and but for this failing the poultry work might be made quite as profitable, if not more profit- able, than any of the other operations on the farm. In the care and management of their poultry farmers are generally erratic and slip- shod, and to expect to find egg- at the farm in winter is more often than not hopeless. If even a smaller stock were kept, things might shew an improvement: and surely every farmer should feel the need of trying to improve this branch. If poultry are allowed to deteriorate, far better that fowls should not be kept at all. In poultry stock the ordinary farmer is years behind the times, and to make him move with the time; in this work is not a task to be easily or quickly done. It would be worth a farmer's while to be- gin by doing a little towards improving his stock of fowls. If this were done, then more would follow without a doubt The results from one or two matters in which change had been made would stir him up to further efforts. Here are a few brief suggestions in regard to improving tlie farmyard stock: 1. Keep no old birds. After two seasons every hen should be disposed of. 2. Avoid having too large a stock. A smaller number of birds of better quality is far better. 3. When a bird is out of sorts take it away from the others, end if it is badly affected rather kill it than risk the epread of disease. 4. Use males of a pure breed with the ordinary hens. Employ a different breed each year. Buy two or three from a good breeder, and keep apart from the hens until three weeks before eggs are required for setting. Let Houdan cockerels be used for the start. 5. Hatoh pullets in March and April, and clear out young cockerels as soon as tney are large enough to kill. 6. Feed on oats and wheat for grains. Short fat oats stand first, wheat next. Let these be given alternately, but let oats be the principal grain. Never give maize but to the hens while sitting; its use is attended with more or less de- triment to the birds in the case of those who lack experienoe. Aiky farmer could, without the least trouble, I carry oat these few hints, and if this were done not only would there be reason to regret having done so, but the results would be such as he little dreamt of. All eorreepondeue affecting this eoluxm shcuMl b* addrssssd to A &a of th* Soil," MI* of au Editor 01 thrn journal.

FAIRS AND MARKETS.

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LADIES' LETTER.

Connoisseur of Pills.

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lALL KIGHTB ZIESBBVRO.J

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WEATHER CHANGES.

MOTOR OMNIBUSES.

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